Graduated from college BUT been unemployed for months now

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talentgenie in Compton, California

52 months ago

I'm a Recruiter with 15 years of experience. I'd like to take a look at your resume and see if I can help you tell a clean, clear story around your work history. I think there are some simple things we can do to make your work history appear cohesive. You can send to talentgenie at gmail dot com.

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Jake in Sycamore, Illinois

41 months ago

The problem with healthcare & education is that we already spend too much on both sectors as a % of aggregate national income. This isn't to say anything about outcomes - only in terms of spending. Our public healthcare programs, like Medicare, Medicaid, and CHIP (which it should be noted have a FAR lower rate of overhead than the private healthcare sector) already spend more, as a percentage of GDP, than other advanced economies spend on their entire healthcare sector - public and private. And they cover everyone, while we're still going to leave about 15-20 million uninsured under the auspices of the ACA and the private health insurance markets.

With education, we spend a ridiculous amount of money per capita AND per pupil, both in primary & secondary school systems (where we mandate access to school for everyone) and the post-secondary system (where we have varying levels of selectivity to access). Especially compared to developing nations like India and China, where they're already graduating more from college than we are (in raw numbers, not percent of population), our education system is significantly over-invested. That sounds perverse given our poor outcomes, but in terms of dollar investment - both in raw figures and percent of GDP - education spending here is WAY high. To say nothing about demographic pressures on the downside.

All this is to say that healthcare & education are not going to remain growth industries for much longer. Increases in employment beyond national trend implies either of two things - increased spending above trend, or wages below trend. Spending above trend is not sustainable, so wages below trend will occur. Healthcare reform "bent the cost curve" & will reduce healthcare spending as a % of GDP over the coming decades. That means either reduced jobs or reduced wages. Education reform is coming, either from the left or right, but it IS coming because some form of cost curve bending is needed in that sector as well.

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Mark in Sweden

41 months ago

The unemployment rate in Sweden is currently extremely high. I can give you a couple of happy endings. Here are six good stories about people who all have in common that they struggled until they got a job after they graduate from college:

My friend “Marcus” graduated in 2007 with a B.A in politics and economics. He wanted a career in government but the economical crisis was eminent. He worked as a salesman for 2-3 years. He learned that there was a demand for people with a social science degrees but a deeper knowledge of statistics. He entered a two year long university program in statistics. Through the university he got ten weeks internship at a prestige governmental agency. He spent most of the time applying for jobs in that field. He quite his internship after just a month and got a year contract at governmental agency producing statistics. Through his just one year experience he got a job as social insurance officer at local government office. It is not a dream job but he makes 50k a year plus benefits.

My friend “Lars” graduated in 2005 with MA in economics. He drove a cab for four years and was also partly unemployed and lived on social welfare. In 2010 he took another Masters in statistics and by 2011 he was hired as an “expert” at a governmental agency. He says he never gave up. Now he makes 60k a year and looks happy all the time.

My friend “Lisa” graduated with an MA in politics in 2009. She was unemployed for more than a year until she got full time job as a social worker. Now she works at “better” government agency, doing pretty much the same job but makes more money and she the beginning of a career.

My friend “Jim” took a B.A in physiotherapy in 2010. He was unemployed and work as warehouse worker for more than a year. Just recently he was unemployed as consult and makes now 60k a year with good benefits.

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Mark in Linköping, Sweden

41 months ago

Average in Everett, Massachusetts said: Were those suppose to be stories suppose to be ironic, Mark? Over in America, most of your friends would have to go into teaching or remain unemployed because their educations would have no value in our job market. In America we have a glut of architects, and wanna-be bureaucrats.

It was just some examples. Most of my friends with professional degrees in nursing, education, engineering, accounting, law and medicine got their first professional job with maximum a few months in unemployment. For most of them it took just a couple of weeks. Before the crisis a B.A or a MA degree in social science was a ticket to a reasonably paid and secure job in government. The European bureaucracy is much larger then in America, Australia or New Zealand. The good thing with America is that you have entry level jobs. Here, they are non-existent. Times are changing and in a few years one of these social sciences degrees will also be worth nothing here if the economy does not turn back in positive direction.

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Bluetea in Texas

40 months ago

Mark in Linköping, Sweden said: It was just some examples. Most of my friends with professional degrees in nursing, education, engineering, accounting, law and medicine got their first professional job with maximum a few months in unemployment. For most of them it took just a couple of weeks. Before the crisis a B.A or a MA degree in social science was a ticket to a reasonably paid and secure job in government. The European bureaucracy is much larger then in America, Australia or New Zealand. The good thing with America is that you have entry level jobs. Here, they are non-existent. Times are changing and in a few years one of these social sciences degrees will also be worth nothing here if the economy does not turn back in positive direction.

A degree in the social sciences or liberal arts is already worthless in America.

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Dave055 in California

40 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: A degree in the social sciences or liberal arts is already worthless in America.

I agree and am beginning to feel same about about a bachelors in Civil Engineering. Without a MS degree or specific work experience in the field, it seems impossible to start anywhere in the United States. E.I.T/FE certification does not seem to make a difference. This engineering field is just over saturated with newly grads and of course the recession makes it worst. I've picked up odd jobs, but have technically been unemployed for over a year since graduation. Two worthless interviews after 100 application. How unfortunate that I don't speak other languages fluently, otherwise I could try applying abroad.

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Average in Medford, Massachusetts

40 months ago

Dave055 in California said: I agree and am beginning to feel same about about a bachelors in Civil Engineering. Without a MS degree or specific work experience in the field, it seems impossible to start anywhere in the United States. E.I.T/FE certification does not seem to make a difference. This engineering field is just over saturated with newly grads and of course the recession makes it worst. I've picked up odd jobs, but have technically been unemployed for over a year since graduation. Two worthless interviews after 100 application. How unfortunate that I don't speak other languages fluently, otherwise I could try applying abroad.

I'm not sure if the engineering field is saturated. I think maybe civil engineering is, because of the dearth of economic activity to support the construction of new buildings or to support infrastructure maintenance. I'm afraid that a lot of our infrastructure is a product of a bygone era when there was less competition for petroleum than there is now. As demand and global consumption of petroleum increases, the interstate highways and the gas-guzzling suvs that populate them begin to look more and more like liabilities than assets.

To get back to my point, civil engineering was never considered in-demand. This is a fact I encountered a few years ago while researching. It's other engineering disciplines that are desirable. Chemical, computer, and mechanical engineering.

At least you have a useful skillset. Now, you just have to move to a country that is actually investing in its infrastructure and has respect for civil engineers. You can forget about India. India is notorious for not giving civil engineers respect. And that is one of the reasons why their infrastructure is in shambles. In India, software engineers and other kinds of engineers are paid much better than civil engineers.

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Mep in Sunnyvale, California

40 months ago

Jake in Sycamore, Illinois said: I'm in a similar situation. It's been said here elsewhere many times, but "entry level" now means experienced but willing to take entry-level wages. It's a tactic to bid the wage down.

I'm also in a similar situation. I graduated last June 2013 with MS in Applied Mathematics.

Sadly, out of at least 100 jobs I applied for, I only got 2 offers.

One offer was for an unpaid, part-time internship that has similar work to my current volunteer job (that has NO relation to my degree). The choice came down to...pay $15/day for transportation to the internship company or get delicious free food and better commute time at the volunteer place. (Yes, there were other factors in that decision.)

The other offer was to write solutions for textbooks. At $8/problem, I spent approximately 2-4 hours on each problem plus an extra 30min to an hour to write it up on Word. It just wasn't worth the extra stress.

So, yes, entry-level or not, many companies are willing to take advantage of those who are in desperate need of a job. Please don't make the mistakes I made, although I learned A LOT from them.

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Mep in Sunnyvale, California

40 months ago

Mep in Sunnyvale, California said: I'm also in a similar situation. I graduated last June 2013 with MS in Applied Mathematics.

Sadly, out of at least 100 jobs I applied for, I only got 2 offers.

One offer was for an unpaid, part-time internship that has similar work to my current volunteer job (that has NO relation to my degree). The choice came down to...pay $15/day for transportation to the internship company or get delicious free food and better commute time at the volunteer place. (Yes, there were other factors in that decision.)

The other offer was to write solutions for textbooks. At $8/problem, I spent approximately 2-4 hours on each problem plus an extra 30min to an hour to write it up on Word. It just wasn't worth the extra stress.

So, yes, entry-level or not, many companies are willing to take advantage of those who are in desperate need of a job. Please don't make the mistakes I made, although I learned A LOT from them.

Sorry, I don't think there's a "modify post" button. The first position, I was not told of what the job description was until the interview. The job posting only stated the job title.

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nate in Billings, Montana

40 months ago

one problem seems to be everyone getting liberal arts bachelors. Why dont anyone here go into a tech field or the trades? thats where the money is at these days...sure its hard work and you dont sit all day but better than driving cabs and making crap cash. I am going int process plant tech good degree for refineries/chemical plants.

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Keith in Sheffield Lake, Ohio

40 months ago

I'm in the tech field. I have a Bachelor of Electrical Engineer degree. Not everyone in this field can get a job, me being one of them. In fact I have given up. Six full years of college down the toilet.

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nate in Billings, Montana

40 months ago

wow interesting...why dont you look into some oil jobs in north dakota? or maybe in canada

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Shadow421 in Deerfield Beach, Florida

40 months ago

Keith, you shouldn't give up. You've got a degree that is definitely worth something. But you may want to consider leaving Ohio. I'm not sure what the unemployment rate is up there, but I've heard that a lot of businesses are leaving that state. The company I used to work for came down here from Ohio.

Another thing I have noticed is that there are a lot of job listings that have engineering degree as a requirement for jobs where there is no engineering involved. They just want someone with a strong technical background. I guess because we're smarter and quick learners...just kidding. It could also be that they are trying to weed people out. Not too many people in the market that are unemployed and have engineering degrees. So that's my 2 cents.

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Shadow421 in Deerfield Beach, Florida

40 months ago

nate, while people with technical backgrounds are less likely to be unemployed then people with non technical backgrounds, the problem is not just people with liberal arts degrees or some other soft science degree. The problem really is over saturation. Once upon a time, a person with a degree, regardless of the area of study, was almost guaranteed a good job with a high income and benefits. Those jobs still exist, there just aren't enough of them to keep up with number of graduates entering the market each year.

It used to be rare for a business to find a college graduate applying for an open position. And that person usually rose through the ranks rather quickly. Now, college graduates are a dime a dozen. You'll probably notice that employers are now requiring master's degrees for jobs that used to require only a bachelor's. Either that or they require that you went to an IVY league school.

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Bluetea in Texas

40 months ago

Shadow421 in Deerfield Beach, Florida said: nate, while people with technical backgrounds are less likely to be unemployed then people with non technical backgrounds, the problem is not just people with liberal arts degrees or some other soft science degree. The problem really is over saturation. Once upon a time, a person with a degree, regardless of the area of study, was almost guaranteed a good job with a high income and benefits. Those jobs still exist, there just aren't enough of them to keep up with number of graduates entering the market each year.

It used to be rare for a business to find a college graduate applying for an open position. And that person usually rose through the ranks rather quickly. Now, college graduates are a dime a dozen. You'll probably notice that employers are now requiring master's degrees for jobs that used to require only a bachelor's. Either that or they require that you went to an IVY league school.

Its called Qualification Inflation. The degree AND requiring additional certifications, licenses or just red hair and green eyes, limits the applicant pool.

My brother was hired right out of high school by Ma Bell. He retired 32 years later and never went to college. Ancient History now.

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Kevin in Kansas City, Missouri

40 months ago

I think you're observations are spot on. There still isn't any significant demand for civil engineers, despite our economy 'officially' being in recovery mode for a couple of years now. The work simply isn't there. Most other engineers aren't having too much trouble finding work at the moment though. There would seem to be demand for this niche industry in emerging economies, but not the US or the developed world currently. The money isn't there to support big infrastructure projects, whether it's from private or public funding. And many western governments are hell bent on cutting budgets, rather than increasing infrastucture investments. The work is coming back when compared to the depths of the recent severe recession, but it's nowhere near fast enough to bring the industry back up to where it used to be prior to the recession, and re-employ all the civil engineers that were either laid off or forced to switch careers in order to stay employed. Add to that the thousands of college graduates that enter the work force every year, just in civil engineering alone, and you clearly have an oversaturated market. This is rather obvious when reading recent job postings for civil engineers. These companies want people at bare bottom salaries with an exceptional high level of qualifications that literally would have been impossible to find only 5 years ago at the salaries being offered. But now they are a dime a dozen. PE license, Masters degree, 10+ years experience, advanced user in a multitude of software programs - you can get all these rolled up in one person for below average industry salaries. And the civil engineer in question can either take the offer or remain unemployed. However, this is not true for most other engineering specialties. Qualified electrical, mechanical, petroleum, computer, and software engineers are now apparently becoming very difficult to find.

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guialera in Henderson, Nevada

37 months ago

I'm pretty much in the same situation and have been unemployed for almost a year. I graduated last summer with a BS in biology and have applied to dozens of positions but have only had one interview and many rejections. I kept hearing STEM graduates were in demand and was naive that I would land a job in 6 months. Many of the positions I have applied require you to have specific techniques already mastered and at least 1+ years of experience even though the positions are entry level. I've been pretty depressed about my situation because my friends have yet graduated and judge me every time I tell them I am still unemployed and even scuffed at the idea that I was interviewing for retail jobs. Funny thing is I worked in retail while in college and these are the only jobs I pretty much can get interviews for. I'm glad I found this thread and know I'm not alone in this.

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Anonymous in Birmingham, Alabama

37 months ago

guialera in Henderson, Nevada said: I'm pretty much in the same situation and have been unemployed for almost a year. I graduated last summer with a BS in biology and have applied to dozens of positions but have only had one interview and many rejections. I kept hearing STEM graduates were in demand and was naive that I would land a job in 6 months. Many of the positions I have applied require you to have specific techniques already mastered and at least 1+ years of experience even though the positions are entry level. I've been pretty depressed about my situation because my friends have yet graduated and judge me every time I tell them I am still unemployed and even scuffed at the idea that I was interviewing for retail jobs. Funny thing is I worked in retail while in college and these are the only jobs I pretty much can get interviews for. I'm glad I found this thread and know I'm not alone in this.

I graduated with a BS in biology in 2009. I tell biology majors now that they're much better off going into a health profession. A lot of applied science fields are oversaturated; there are too many grads and not enough jobs. I have friends with masters degrees in biology who ended up having to go back to trade school or community college to get a completely-unrelated career going. One is a chef now.

I was only able to get a retail job after graduating. It was horrid, but it was all I could find. I'm back looking now, and it'll probably be retail or fast food this time.

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guialera in Henderson, Nevada

37 months ago

Anonymous in Birmingham, Alabama said: I graduated with a BS in biology in 2009. I tell biology majors now that they're much better off going into a health profession. A lot of applied science fields are oversaturated; there are too many grads and not enough jobs. I have friends with masters degrees in biology who ended up having to go back to trade school or community college to get a completely-unrelated career going. One is a chef now.

I was only able to get a retail job after graduating. It was horrid, but it was all I could find. I'm back looking now, and it'll probably be retail or fast food this time.

That's what I feared. I was actually accepted into a Master's program for biology but with no guaranteed funding so I would be responsible for out of state tuition and living expenses. This meant taking out student loans and I heard the same thing as your friends about career prospects after graduate school and didn't want to be stuck with debt and working in completely unrelated job.

Thank you for this comment because I've gotten advice from people in their 40's and I don't think they understand how bad it currently is for recent graduates. Someone actually told me to accept the Master's offer and take on the student loans because she could see me earning $60,000 after graduating O_O. I'm glad I didn't take their advice.

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Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

37 months ago

Why take on more debt with a Master's if you can't even find a job with a Bachelor's degree.

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Anon in Birmingham, Alabama

37 months ago

Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas said: Why take on more debt with a Master's if you can't even find a job with a Bachelor's degree.

guialera in Henderson, Nevada said: That's what I feared. I was actually accepted into a Master's program for biology but with no guaranteed funding so I would be responsible for out of state tuition and living expenses. This meant taking out student loans and I heard the same thing as your friends about career prospects after graduate school and didn't want to be stuck with debt and working in completely unrelated job.

I've been accepted to several grad schools. I'm actually working on my master's now, but I decided to just look for a summer job and transfer to a CLS program. The school I'm in for my master's has basically told me they have no funding (all my "funding" will be loans to the tune of $100,000 for out-of-state tuition). I'm just not motivated anymore; after four years, it seems like nothing is working, but I'm trying to find motivation to start the CLS program in the Fall. So what you may want to do is try to get a MS in a health profession (like CLS, occupational therapy, health administration, genetic counseling, etc.) or just go to pharm/med/vet school. It's a lot of debt, but it's much more promising than continuing on in rote science. I guess I'm still having a hard time because I think I'm permanently afraid because of this hell I've been going through the last four years. I'm starting to wonder if I'll ever be able to get on track and have a somewhat decent life.

An alternative could be to just go to trade school or community college and get an associate's in a health profession. Many times you do the same work as someone with a master's, and you often earn the same amount of money.

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Anon in Birmingham, Alabama

37 months ago

Sometimes getting a master's helps you, but sometimes it doesn't. At this point, I know only one person who pursued his MS (in my field) and found a job. It just depends on how much risk you want to take. There are articles galore about how there are no jobs for scientists, yet everyone still thinks scientists are the most easily-employed people out there. After getting a bachelor's, I think most are better off going another route. Environmental science, environmental management and public health are better graduate degrees to get, I believe. (I think the best thing to do is to go the health professions route, like I mentioned above.) Part of the problem is that many students and professors don't realize how it is out here until they find themselves out here. Many end up back in school because their bachelor's degree has aged, and the only way to keep it "alive" is to become more educated.

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Calfornian in Hayward, California

37 months ago

guialera in Henderson, Nevada said: Many of the positions I have applied require you to have specific techniques already mastered and at least 1+ years of experience even though the positions are entry level.

Yeah, you kind of have to hit it just right, and it's definitely a moving target.

We like to pretend that success / failure is all about gumption, drive and effort. To a point it's true but picking the right niche really matters too. You be the best ever at something in the STEM realm and not be able to make a penny from it just because, well, sometimes, just because.

Technology is the worst because what's hot today might not be tomorrow. And since they want experience, only in the tech, well, you often need to guess 5 years in advance of when you go looking for work.

Good luck man, I feel the pain.

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Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania

37 months ago

Calfornian in Hayward, California said:

We like to pretend that success / failure is all about gumption, drive and effort. To a point it's true but picking the right niche really matters too. You be the best ever at something in the STEM realm and not be able to make a penny from it just because, well, sometimes, just because.......

Absolutely spot on and a very hard lesson I have learned in just this last year of unemployment. I wrongly believed what so many of us were taught; if you are willing to work just a little harder, learn another skill, work well with your co-workers, always be respectful to your boss, and just sacrifice a little more, you will stand apart and never be unemployed for long.

I am sort of relieved to know what I know now. It's not personal. It never was. But it sure stinks to be unemployed when you don't want to be. I wish I knew the secret to finding employment again and keeping it.

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Anon in Birmingham, Alabama

37 months ago

Check out the "Bachelors degree in Biology, what can you do with it?" thread. I've found that, in the few interviews I did get (before my degree got old), employers preferred someone who was trained over someone who wasn't. It makes sense, but it can exclude many new grads who don't have much lab experience. Even grads who do have experience may not have the type of experience for the kinds of lab jobs they are applying for.

I found it very difficult to even be accepted as a volunteer, because you inevitably take up time and money. I also found that many labs were already saturated with students and couldn't take on "extras."

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hurrikane4eva@yahoo in Miami, Florida

36 months ago

Larry in Fort Lauderdale, Florida said: The reason why unemployment is so low is because people are running out of unemployment and no longer counted, it hurts the stock market if the *real* unemployment number was made public…..lets not forget that our GOV wants to act like everything is sunshine and roses at 8.3%. The accurate number is very close to 20%.
I hate my current job but it pays almost $30 an hour so for now I will just keep my lips zipped and be friendly with the boss(es) :(

hi Larry, is your job currently doing any hiring? Im in the South Fl area and placed in this same situation...smh

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Elaine in Orange, California

36 months ago

It's nice to know there are others who are struggling to find unemployment. I have a B.A. In criminal justice, fell in love with teaching and decided to go back to school for my credential and M.A. In Education. I was substitute teaching, but was not getting called that often to sub, so only making a few extra bucks here and there. Been looking for a year, and I have had no luck with getting an interview in any position. I've applied to different jobs anywhere from pharmaceutical sales to retail, and no luck. Finally, just recently landed a part-time job in real estate only because a friend referred me. With 100k in debt from student loans I feel worthless.

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Elaine in Orange, California

36 months ago

Oops I meant employment...

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Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

36 months ago

I had to work 2 part-time jobs for 3 years so I could pay my bills, I eventually found a good full-time job with benefits. I takes a lot of time to find something.

I do agree the UE # is around 15-17 %.

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tough90zx in Raleigh

36 months ago

I graduated from college in June of 2008 and had to move back in with my parents because the job market was abysmal. I searched for almost 4 months before I found a job and it was a 6 month contract position. I remember what it was like. "This too shall pass."

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Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

36 months ago

Doesn't that part of NC have a decent job market ?

What is your degree in?

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tough90zx in Raleigh

36 months ago

Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas said: Doesn't that part of NC have a decent job market ?

What is your degree in?

Yes, the job market in Raleigh is decent. I was living in Greensboro at the time which is a much different story. Thankfully that is water under the bridge.

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geob9484 in Morton Grove, Illinois

35 months ago

The grads of 2008 & 09 are the hardest people hit as a result of all this. Anyone who wants to debate this with me is free to do so and you better make a good statement. There should be incentives and tax breaks for people who graduated from any type of higher education during these years. I graduated in 2008. Never had a full time job. You think you're frustrated? If you graduated in 2010 or 2011, shut up and stop complaining. In the eyes of the employer you still have new and current skills. I graduated right before the Bush Recession kicked in full throttle. Overnight my degree was voided completely useless. Today, the employees see short spurts of employment on my resume and that's as far as I get. After 5 years of retooling only to be continually laid off or hired part time, I can honestly say I will never vote again. I honestly hope for the demise of both parties, neither is more effective beyond bickering over who's fault the current state of the times are. Honestly, what do politicians really stand for these days anyway? Obama is a pig. Cut off the baby boomers

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Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

35 months ago

Geob9484,

What was your college major ?

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alera in Henderson, Nevada

35 months ago

geob9484 in Morton Grove, Illinois said: The grads of 2008 & 09 are the hardest people hit as a result of all this. Anyone who wants to debate this with me is free to do so and you better make a good statement. There should be incentives and tax breaks for people who graduated from any type of higher education during these years. I graduated in 2008. Never had a full time job. You think you're frustrated? If you graduated in 2010 or 2011, shut up and stop complaining. In the eyes of the employer you still have new and current skills. I graduated right before the Bush Recession kicked in full throttle. Overnight my degree was voided completely useless. Today, the employees see short spurts of employment on my resume and that's as far as I get. After 5 years of retooling only to be continually laid off or hired part time, I can honestly say I will never vote again. I honestly hope for the demise of both parties, neither is more effective beyond bickering over who's fault the current state of the times are. Honestly, what do politicians really stand for these days anyway? Obama is a pig. Cut off the baby boomers

I won't argue which college graduate class has it worse but I believe all college graduates that have graduated since the recession began have it rough. I graduated in 2012 and after over a year of searching for a job I just landed a part-time position with no prospects of being promoted to full-time. Employers could care less what "new skills" I possess and what fancy of a subject degree I have. If you don't have connections then you can kiss the prospects of landing a full-time job with benefits goodbye. I still live with my parents and barely can afford to have my car fixed and not to mention the depression/anxiety stemming from unemployment/underemployment. To pit one class against another is the most irresponsible thing our generation can do. Also, name calling politicians makes our generation look like uneducated know it all punks.

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John in Catonsville, Maryland

35 months ago

geob9484 in Morton Grove, Illinois said: Cut off the baby boomers

I agree with a number of your points, but might I ask why you should be more entitled than a baby boomer? Especially one who would just like to make a living like you want to?

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Average in Winnersville, Massachusetts

35 months ago

geob9484 in Morton Grove, Illinois said: The grads of 2008 & 09 are the hardest people hit as a result of all this... Never had a full time job. You think you're frustrated? If you graduated in 2010 or 2011, shut up and stop complaining. In the eyes of the employer you still have new and current skills. I graduated right before the Bush Recession kicked in full throttle. Overnight my degree was voided completely useless. Today, the employees see short spurts of employment on my resume and that's as far as I get. After 5 years of retooling only to be continually laid off or hired part time, I can honestly say I will never vote again. I honestly hope for the demise of both parties, neither is more effective beyond bickering over who's fault the current state of the times are.

The current economy is the result of the problems outlined in The Club of Rome's "The Limits to Growth" report. Look it up on the internet.

The main reaction to higher oil prices in a country that uses a lot of oil, since 2008, has been to increase unemployment and poverty. Increasing unemployment and poverty (low wage jobs) seem to be keeping oil prices from rising faster than they did over the last decade. Full employment, in the U.S. , after the events of 2008, would cause a lot of inflation at this point, and would bring oil prices back to 2007 to 2008 levels, which would cause the economy to tank. The same can be said about the virtual money that the government's bank created to bail out the financial sector. If banks, and other companies 'sitting on piles of cash' were to resume loose lending and spending like they did back in the early 00s, it would cause a lot of inflation, possibly hyperinflation.

The economy can't grow anymore.

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Bluetea in Texas

35 months ago

Average in Winnersville, Massachusetts said: Full employment, in the U.S. , after the events of 2008, would cause a lot of inflation at this point, and would bring oil prices back to 2007 to 2008 levels, which would cause the economy to tank. The economy can't grow anymore.

At my last job, one of my reports had me tracking the price of oil as well as the Dollar/Yuan conversion.

We are printing money at an alarming rate and keeping unemployment high is one way to control "too many dollars chasing too few goods" but its not sustainable. Eventually, the Dollar will become toilet paper.

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Riot in Massachusetts

35 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said:
We are printing money at an alarming rate and keeping unemployment high is one way to control "too many dollars chasing too few goods" but its not sustainable. Eventually, the Dollar will become toilet paper.

Monetary policy doesn't just function in the "inflation" direction, you can also decrease the supply of money. We just have to hope that whoever has their hand on the switch after Bernanke leaves is halfway competent at timing.

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Bluetea in Texas

35 months ago

Riot in Massachusetts said: Monetary policy doesn't just function in the "inflation" direction, you can also decrease the supply of money. We just have to hope that whoever has their hand on the switch after Bernanke leaves is halfway competent at timing.

As long as nothing is backing it up, you can even get rid of it altogether: Confederate dollars, Reichsmarks, Euros, etc.

I remember when the Berlin Wall was up, going over to the east side. I had to "buy" East German money. I still have some. It feels like play money. Worthless today.

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John in Catonsville, Maryland

35 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: As long as nothing is backing it up, you can even get rid of it altogether: Confederate dollars, Reichsmarks, Euros, etc.

I remember when the Berlin Wall was up, going over to the east side. I had to "buy" East German money. I still have some. It feels like play money. Worthless today.

Perhaps that money will be worth something on ebay..... in another 150 years after everybody else has thrown theirs out :)

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Completely Broke and Broken in Cleveland, Ohio

35 months ago

Riot in Massachusetts said: Monetary policy doesn't just function in the "inflation" direction, you can also decrease the supply of money. We just have to hope that whoever has their hand on the switch after Bernanke leaves is halfway competent at timing.

The problem being, no one in history has been competent at money supply timing.

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Riot in Massachusetts

35 months ago

Completely Broke and Broken in Cleveland, Ohio said: The problem being, no one in history has been competent at money supply timing.

I think that this is the problem much more than no longer being on a gold or silver standard. One might argue that the 2007 to 2009 recession might not have happened, or might not have happened the way it did, if we were still on a commodity-backed Dollar (Hypothetically, there housing bubble would not have inflated as much as it did without a large money supply.), but it definitely would have been worse if we had no tools to increase liquidity. The debt markets would probably still be frozen today.

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Bluetea in Texas

35 months ago

Riot in Massachusetts said: I think that this is the problem much more than no longer being on a gold or silver standard. One might argue that the 2007 to 2009 recession might not have happened, or might not have happened the way it did, if we were still on a commodity-backed Dollar (Hypothetically, there housing bubble would not have inflated as much as it did without a large money supply.), but it definitely would have been worse if we had no tools to increase liquidity. The debt markets would probably still be frozen today.

Most likely. In Economics, we had to all take out a dollar and look at the top and read it.

Its says, "Federal Reserve Note". Then, the teacher said, "Today, we will discuss what a note is".

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Penny in Espanola, New Mexico

35 months ago

Shadow421 in Deerfield Beach, Florida said: nate, while people with technical backgrounds are less likely to be unemployed then people with non technical backgrounds, the problem is not just people with liberal arts degrees or some other soft science degree. The problem really is over saturation. Once upon a time, a person with a degree, regardless of the area of study, was almost guaranteed a good job with a high income and benefits. Those jobs still exist, there just aren't enough of them to keep up with number of graduates entering the market each year.

It used to be rare for a business to find a college graduate applying for an open position. And that person usually rose through the ranks rather quickly. Now, college graduates are a dime a dozen. You'll probably notice that employers are now requiring master's degrees for jobs that used to require only a bachelor's. Either that or they require that you went to an IVY league school.

Oh don't think for a New York Minute that the IVIES help one iota. I've filled out applications that were written by, apparently, people who haven't HEARD of Cornell. I kid you not. And/or the application asks you for your f***ing GPA anyway - the "big three" Ivies all grade PASS/NO PASS, you world full of idiots. (HR recruitment people who write the online applications, not "everybody")

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Penny in Espanola, New Mexico

35 months ago

alera in Henderson, Nevada said: I won't argue which college graduate class has it worse but I believe all college graduates that have graduated since the recession began have it rough. I graduated in 2012 and after over a year of searching for a job I just landed a part-time position with no prospects of being promoted to full-time. Employers could care less what "new skills" I possess and what fancy of a subject degree I have. If you don't have connections then you can kiss the prospects of landing a full-time job with benefits goodbye. I still live with my parents and barely can afford to have my car fixed and not to mention the depression/anxiety stemming from unemployment/underemployment. To pit one class against another is the most irresponsible thing our generation can do. Also, name calling politicians makes our generation look like uneducated know it all punks.

Try having graduated in the early- or mid-1990's and then we'll talk. My "original" undergrad transcripts are on MICROFICHE in the ARCHIVES for God's sake. Even in the 90's I had a hella hard time getting anything full-time right after graduation and up until the "dot boom" of the Turn of the Century. By now my education is just tossed aside as being "too long ago" and since I haven't had any REAL full-time work experience that's lasted longer than a long-term TEMP job, by now my life is totally screwed. I pity the generation that's growing up with THESE being "the good ol' days" because at least I can remember that the first decade of my life were the days when a college degree still DID matter and still DID get you at least A full-time job with benefits.

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Penny in Espanola, New Mexico

35 months ago

guialera in Henderson, Nevada said: I'm pretty much in the same situation and have been unemployed for almost a year. I graduated last summer with a BS in biology and have applied to dozens of positions but have only had one interview and many rejections. I kept hearing STEM graduates were in demand and was naive that I would land a job in 6 months. Many of the positions I have applied require you to have specific techniques already mastered and at least 1+ years of experience even though the positions are entry level . I've been pretty depressed about my situation because my friends have yet graduated and judge me every time I tell them I am still unemployed and even scuffed at the idea that I was interviewing for retail jobs. Funny thing is I worked in retail while in college and these are the only jobs I pretty much can get interviews for. I'm glad I found this thread and know I'm not alone in this.

The BS you were fed that "STEM graduates were in demand" - didn't mean the Biological Sciences. It means the Chem and Physics ones (but not plain ol' Chem). The ones that require Calculus and above in Math. I got a Math teaching license and still that doesn't help. Even that job market is oversaturated. Difference being, the high school teaching job market is oversaturated with people who have English or "Education" majors who "know the Principal" or other acts of nepotism which is why American high school students are, as a whole, NOT learning their Math in high school at the same levels as their counterparts in certain other countries where Math is taught by, um, Mathematicians. Or Physicists. People look at me like I'm speaking Latin or Greek when I suggest that high school Math and Physics should be taught by Mathematicians or Physicists (or the Physicist could teach both).

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Penny in Espanola, New Mexico

35 months ago

guialera in Henderson, Nevada said: I'm pretty much in the same situation and have been unemployed for almost a year. I graduated last summer with a BS in biology and have applied to dozens of positions but have only had one interview and many rejections. I kept hearing STEM graduates were in demand and was naive that I would land a job in 6 months. Many of the positions I have applied require you to have specific techniques already mastered and at least 1+ years of experience even though the positions are entry level . I've been pretty depressed about my situation because my friends have yet graduated and judge me every time I tell them I am still unemployed and even scuffed at the idea that I was interviewing for retail jobs. Funny thing is I worked in retail while in college and these are the only jobs I pretty much can get interviews for. I'm glad I found this thread and know I'm not alone in this.

No, you're not alone. I would almost KILL to stock shelves at PetsMart right about now. Or feed CATS (including cleaning litter boxes) at the Animal Shelter -- if places like that didn't credit check and drug test (I'm on one hell of a lot of blood pressure medications that show up as OTHER THINGS on drug tests because the people in the Labs are stupid, prejudiced idiots). I don't relish the thought of going "back" to Call Center work but in that case at least the racist verbal abuse is only in ONE EAR since they can't SEE me if I can get that kind of job past the credit check, reference check and drug test.

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Mikesha Beam in Lady Lake, Florida

32 months ago

talentgenie in Compton, California said: I'm a Recruiter with 15 years of experience. I'd like to take a look at your resume and see if I can help you tell a clean, clear story around your work history. I think there are some simple things we can do to make your work history appear cohesive. You can send to talentgenie at gmail dot com.

I would like you to see my resume as well. I do have work history but still nothing after graduating with my MBA. My email adress in beam.mikesha@gmail.com

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mikesummerlin in Ridgeland, Mississippi

30 months ago

The problem I see with college grads,a s an employere, is that they expect six figures for a low five figure work ethic. Economics is on the top 10 "lowest values for the money" educations. Why not look at opportunities in financial Services. THis is the fstest growing industry in the world and the 3rd highest paid. New York Life is an incrdible opportunity.

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