Graphic Designer Needs a Career Change

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

22 months ago

How did I forget marketing and PR? I'm sure there's probably 10 types of programming I need to know, too. I forgot 3-D animation, running a printing press, and fixing the computer.

I've struggled for a few years here. I got my degree in 2008. Not sure if that was the thing to go back to school for, but too late now.

Right now I'm working on some illustration for a company. It's the old fashioned hand drawn kind. I don't mind doing that, but it's still not helping me keep my skills fresh. I have to do that on my own time.

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Bluetea in Texas

22 months ago

designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin said: It is a pain to even try to keep up with it all. I always seem to be 5 steps behind what they all want because they want the impossible jack of all trades. I don't think that employers would ask for so much if they actually knew what it all takes to even learn all that and be good at it. The software that we use is complicated enough without adding all the other stuff to it.

I think you forgot to add photography, copywriting, programming, Word Press, Joomla, Java, Actionscript, MS Office, and about 10 other things to your list. Makes my head spin.

They usually ask me about some software that I have never heard of it. Its been out a week and already they want someone with 3 years experience in it.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

22 months ago

I've seen ads asking for software that either I never heard of or it's so specialized that you would only learn it on the job. You won't learn it in school.

The best one was an ad for a graphic designer asking for bartender experience. I thought they were trying to be humorous since sometimes you find that in ads. Here I found out it was a bar code software. Darn it, I thought they wanted me to serve drinks to the rest of the office crew.

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Bluetea in Texas

22 months ago

designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin said: I've seen ads asking for software that either I never heard of or it's so specialized that you would only learn it on the job. You won't learn it in school.

The best one was an ad for a graphic designer asking for bartender experience. I thought they were trying to be humorous since sometimes you find that in ads. Here I found out it was a bar code software. Darn it, I thought they wanted me to serve drinks to the rest of the office crew.

Bee, there is a used book store near me that will give me credit for my used books, if I purchase other used books. There are several genres that he will not take. At the top of the list are computer books.

He says, "Throw 'em out. They go out-of-date too fast!" Heh!

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web designer in Madison, Mississippi

22 months ago

Don't forget to mention all the .NET stuff on top of HTML5, CSS3, Javascript, Jquery, PHP, etc. I'm feeling really done.

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karen in Indianapolis, Indiana

22 months ago

julcraft in Spring Hill, Florida said: I am not a Graphic Designer , but was on this forum deciding if I wanted to enter the Graphic Design world. I reviewed your website and find it outdated; however your logo created is great! I think you should make the logo more predominate. Think fashion forward, take ques from the fashion industry. It has been proven that almost all color combinations, textiles and style is derived from the fashion industry.

Julcraft what the heck are you talking about? This forum was not intended as a digital portfolio of anyone's work. It is merely an attempt to inform anyone considering to pursue a career in graphics what they can expect industry wise. It's an over saturated, highly competitive, and most often underpaid profession requiring extensive knowledge of not only the graphics programs but programming languages that change almost daily.

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DodgerCats in Los Angeles, California

21 months ago

I am 36...I have a Bachelor's degree in Multimedia and a Bachelor's degree in graphic Design. All of my jobs were staff corporate designer positions. I was lucky to have great managers, nice co-workers, rarely having to work overtime, full benefits (including paid winter break shutdown) and making a decent salary. But was I happy? Nope...not really. I was unhappy even before the economy turned to crap, and perhaps it was burnout or just a decline in passion. As much as I love design, I started to realize that I have multiple skills and strengths and a strong passion for other things that are not necessarily art-related, and I could easily have gone into other various careers.

I was laid off February 2012 after having worked at my last company for almost 7 years. I didn't feel bad about it because I had already decided 6 months before my layoff that I was going to get ready to apply for b-school (have been thinking about this since 2007) and enroll in a fully-employed MBA program. Getting laid off just gave me more opportunity to study for the GMAT and get my applications ready. I plan to do a full career change by getting an MBA with an emphasis in accounting. I'm luckier than most in the fact that I do not have a mortgage, I do not have children, I have no student loans, and I have emotional and some financial support from my family during this change. I've enrolled in a couple of beginner accounting classes at the local community college. I hope to get accepted into an MBA program for Fall 2013 where I can fully start to learn about business and accounting and work towards my Masters and becoming a CPA. At the age of 36, I realize that I need to gain some experience starting now, and I've accepted the fact that I'll probably have to start off in an entry-level, lower wage A/P job and pay my dues, just like I had to do when I started my career in design.

Unfortunately I don't see any positives in regard to staying in this field. The job market is completely

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DodgerCats in Los Angeles, California

21 months ago

saturated with high school kids learning graphic design in school, self-taught designers, designers from for-profit schools such as Art Institute, recent college grads with degrees in design, and seasoned professionals. Everyone wants to be a designer because they think it's fun, but the reality is that there are very few design jobs that even pay a decent salary, especially living in Los Angeles where the cost of living is high.

I was browsing design jobs a couple of months ago and came across a job posting for a graphic designer. They wanted a "rock star designer" who had a few years of experience under his/her belt, would be willing to do print and code web, and the salary they were offering was $28k. The real kicker is the ad had a sentence that said something along the lines of "If you're the type of person who likes to clock out right at 5 pm- this job isn't for you." So in other words, they were looking for a designer to work for the crap salary for $28k, and just based on that sentence, the designer would be expected to work lots of overtime without pay.

Being unemployed for the last 7 months, I have been volunteering my design skills to help various non-profits pro-bono with small occasional projects. It's quite rewarding and fun, just like when I was going to school. I plan to continue in design even after my career change- but only as a "volunteer graphic designer" in my spare time. To those thinking about this career, avoid it like the plague if you like stability...it is not a lucrative field to be in. To those thinking about switching from this career, take a chance and do it regardless of your age or experience. The job market for designers have been pretty bad, but I expect it to get worse. I know some companies are even outsourcing design work to other countries. The movie industry, especially CGI/special effects have been doing it for a few years and that is also a creative field. No doubt that it will happen more and more in design.

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Mandybelle80 in Atlanta, Georgia

18 months ago

I also have a BFA in Graphic Design and could not find work. I eventually went back to school to study cosmetology, because it is hands on. I get to do designs on toenails when I'm doing pedicures and that is about all it's worth. But I am hoping to get a master's in business administration and one day become a spa manager later on, when I grow tired of spa and nail work.

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Mandybelle80 in Atlanta, Georgia

18 months ago

wiseman in Gresham, Oregon said: Hmm, this is all very disconcerting. I attended a good graphic design and art college in MT. I switched from design to Printmaking Studio towards the end, and got my BFA. I have been trying to find design work since, and have toyed with the idea of of going back to school to take the last few classes for a Design BFA, but now I am very nervous. Do all of you think going to something more specific is BETTER or WORSE? Such as very INTRICATE Photoshop work, the stuff not everyone can do, that requires lots of knowledge? In-depth vector art? These things are specific enough that not every noob with inDesign can do them well. I love art and graphics , but not corporate graphics so much. I have thought about going the illustration route, or even trying to make it in the world of oil painting... See, the confusing thing is we were taught that studio arts were really a shot in the dark, one in a million becomes famous... but GRAPHIC DESIGN was the solid foundation where we were GUARANTEED a stable and good paying job. Sigh. I cannot really afford anymore college debt, but I don't see another option. There are plenty of design jobs here, but I can't seem to get called for interviews, and I have less experience than all of you, even though I love web and Flash work... Don't know what to do.... sounds like even if I DO find work in the field, it will only get worse from here....

Please don't get into anymore debit. I have artistic skills too, but they aren't worth so much. I went on to be a nail technician and use design skills for something that cannot be outsourced to India. You can also think of designing art on pockets of jeans or something and selling them on etsy. Or if you are really persistent, you can create your own local business (website), where you travel to local business owners, take quality pictures of their products, build their website and product labels, etc.

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GroundskeeperWillie4 in Minneapolis, Minnesota

15 months ago

Guys, we're creatives. We make a living thinking-up the unthought-of. Shift your thinking from changing careers to shifting the focus — what else can you do with what you have/know/do/done/did and can you monetize it? This is how designers become photographers, photographers become furniture makers, etc. It's only HARD if you can't or don't have a flexible imagination.

I have a friend in Georgia that works part-time as a designer at a small boutique agency, and paints the other half. He's been able to buy a studio, have regular shows and earn more painting than he does designing. But they support each other, as one discipline feeds the other.

Think. What else can you do with your talents? How else can you use your creativity to YOUR advantage? Shift the thinking.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

15 months ago

GroundskeeperWillie4 in Minneapolis, Minnesota said: Guys, we're creatives. We make a living thinking-up the unthought-of. Shift your thinking from changing careers to shifting the focus — what else can you do with what you have/know/do/done/did and can you monetize it? This is how designers become photographers, photographers become furniture makers, etc. It's only HARD if you can't or don't have a flexible imagination.

I have a friend in Georgia that works part-time as a designer at a small boutique agency, and paints the other half. He's been able to buy a studio, have regular shows and earn more painting than he does designing. But they support each other, as one discipline feeds the other.

Think. What else can you do with your talents? How else can you use your creativity to YOUR advantage? Shift the thinking.

I like what you said about shifting your focus. Many designers have creative hobbies on the side as it is. Sometimes taking a hobby and making it a business is all you need.

I have designer friends who have changed their direction a bit. A couple went into photography and one of those also does wedding slideshows with the photos. Another opened a specialty toy store (she used to be a chef in another life also). One is looking at using her glass making skills (beads and such). Another designer started working as a florist.

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Bluetea in Texas

15 months ago

designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin said: I like what you said about shifting your focus. Many designers have creative hobbies on the side as it is. Sometimes taking a hobby and making it a business is all you need.

I have designer friends who have changed their direction a bit. A couple went into photography and one of those also does wedding slideshows with the photos. Another opened a specialty toy store (she used to be a chef in another life also). One is looking at using her glass making skills (beads and such). Another designer started working as a florist.

There is a woman at my sister's church who paints faux walls - usually bedrooms. She charges upwards of $500 (cash) and is booked like six months in advance. She has no formal training.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

15 months ago

I see a woman in my town that runs an ad in the paper for the faux painting. Another way you can get creative.

Look at all that stuff people are selling on Etsy. If you have the just the right thing that people want, you can make some decent money.

Pinterest is also very good for creative inspiration. You can see what others are doing.

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avg in Medford, Massachusetts

15 months ago

GroundskeeperWillie4 in Minneapolis, Minnesota said: Guys, we're creatives. We make a living thinking-up the unthought-of. Shift your thinking from changing careers to shifting the focus — what else can you do with what you have/know/do/done/did and can you monetize it? This is how designers become photographers, photographers become furniture makers, etc. It's only HARD if you can't or don't have a flexible imagination.

I have a friend in Georgia that works part-time as a designer at a small boutique agency, and paints the other half. He's been able to buy a studio, have regular shows and earn more painting than he does designing. But they support each other, as one discipline feeds the other.
.

You're just leaving out the trust-fund and or support from a spouse who makes steady income.

The process of monetizing multiple 'talents' is difficult. There are a few people who are really gifted in multiple areas, but most artists spend a lot of time and resources focusing in one area. A great photographer may not be a great furniture maker. Sure, they can "learn", but just like going to back to school, they need to eat feed and cloth themselves during the process. In a competitive market for handmade products, I suspect that one needs to be great to succeed or offer a compelling marketing angle.

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dsgingi in New York, New York

15 months ago

Hi Everyone. After reading all the posts in this thread, I felt compelled to tell my story too. It all sounds so familiar and wanted to share my experiences. Any advice would be appreciated. In my last year in school I took an internship at one of the major financial institutions here in the NYC. The 3-month internship turned into 6 years. I learned a tremendous amount and I was very happy. After taking an opportunity to spend a year working overseas in publishing design, I came back to NY. I was confident that with more than 7 years experience including international experience, I would have no trouble finding the perfect job. Of course, I failed to consider the economy. There was nothing out there and lots of talent to compete with. After many years of freelancing here and there (mostly at Financial Institutions), getting laid off twice in a two-year period, I started to get pretty discouraged and lost most of my confidence in my design ability. I also found that all the freelance jobs I was getting were in or related to major financial institutions. It was clear that I had become “type-casted” to the point that even I was convinced that financial design was the only kind of design I could do. I’m now working at yet another financial institution for more than 3 years. It is a stable job but a very dysfunctional environment with a difficult manager to work with. My problem now is I have lost the enthusiasm I used to have for design. I used to be so passionate about visual problem solving. Now I find myself saying I don’t like design anymore. This has made my work suffer and I no longer feel creative. I am beginning see that it is time to move on to something else, but what? Like others in this discussion, I also never really cared for web design so that isn’t an option. I’ve been trying to think of fields where I can still use some of the skills I’ve learned as a designer. Maybe become a headhunter for creative. Not sure what is involved with that but I don’t real

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dsgingi in New York, New York

15 months ago

Continuation...
really consider myself a “people person,” which I think would be a big part of making connections. I am also considering Exhibit design since I enjoy using my hands and it always interested me how museums are laid out. This would probably require going back to school full time and not sure I will ever be able to make the kind of money I am making now. I would love to hear other directions people have taken. It seems like this is the main issue that we all face. What to do next?

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Calam in San Jose, California

14 months ago

avg in Medford, Massachusetts said: You're just leaving out the trust-fund and or support from a spouse who makes steady income.

The process of monetizing multiple 'talents' is difficult. There are a few people who are really gifted in multiple areas, but most artists spend a lot of time and resources focusing in one area. A great photographer may not be a great furniture maker. Sure, they can "learn", but just like going to back to school, they need to eat feed and cloth themselves during the process. In a competitive market for handmade products, I suspect that one needs to be great to succeed or offer a compelling marketing angle.

Or the part where you have no life because you're working full time and are going back to school for graphic design part-time. Or you're doing as much freelance as you can while learning about UI for video games - which is what I'm doing now (it's a fairly smooth transition skill wise, but does require more illustration training than I currently have).

I completely agree though, if you spread yourself too thin then you end up being just ok at a bunch of stuff and won't likely see much return from any of your endeavors. If you are a graphic designer that is having trouble getting a job in the field take a look at what is being looked for currently. In my (new) area my previous job, graphic design for print, isn't much needed but UI artists are. So, I'm going to work on becoming a UI artist. Be fluid, yes, but be rational about it. Or, you know, go back to school and take any job you can while attending to make ends meet and get into another field.

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CGecko99 in Loma Linda, California

13 months ago

Rolinda in Chula Vista, California said: Hi Stillinlimbo and Randy, I empathize with you. It can be a bit disconcerting to say the least when one's future seems uncertain. Follow your heart. Researching other professions and exploring new careers will give you an uplifted feeling of confidence and renewal. I hope this helps. I wish you well. Good journey.

Yeah I've been struggling with this graphic design thing not being a good gig as a new grad. I am a techie though- so I've been looking into IT and computer science. Turns out I have a lot of math to do if I want to go the computer science route. I think I'm gonna "cowboy up" and give the math a try. I let everyone here know how it goes.

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grod007 in Houston, Texas

12 months ago

Having worked in design and now in consulting, I quickly learned that designers are greatly under-valued. One thing that helped me was realizing I had to learn my co-workers and my clients the value of design in supporting their goals and strategy, by learning to speak in terms they would understand, "the language of business." Design brings value and so do designers, unfortunately a of people do not understand that, so they see you as a "nice to have" not as a necessity. If you can communicate to them that you can help them achieve what they want, they will value you more. Read my post: "Creatives get a bad rap--but Shouldn’t!" at www.grodland.com.

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iBelieveinMiracles in San Clemente, California

11 months ago

Looking for new job in Longmont, Colorado said: I am 55 years old with over 30 years of national award winning experience as a magazine art director . 10 years ago I made a salary of $70,000/year. In my last job (which I just resigned from since I wasn't willing to work 14 hour days and pay my way for my own travel on my CC and then get reimbursed a month or two later) I made $45,000/year. I'm talented, know all of the latest software, and really know the business world. I'm ready to bail on this career because of the lack of jobs, good freelance contracts , and just generally dealing with impossible clients that demand the world, have no consideration for your time and are amazingly rude. It's degrading these days to have to work in extremely low-paying jobs with people that are half my age that don't have a mortgage to pay along with other 'grown up' expenses. Gone are the prestigious magazine art director jobs. They've been replaced with ' graphic designers' and do twice as much work with half the pay.

If I had it to do all over again, I'd NEVER consider this line of work. I'd pick a nursing career or something related to medicine. It will always be needed, you get to actually HELP people, and are doing something for society. Sorry to sound so bitter but it's been a very tough road out there for the past 10 years and I don't see it turning around anytime soon.

I completely understand you on being bitter and don't feel bad about it. I am not in my fifties but am in my 30's and have over a decade of experience in the field. After being laid off from my big honcho Magazine job it's been hard to find a job. I often wonder if companies are even getting my e-mails and if they are why aren't they hiring me? Maybe, it's because we have many years experience and they don't want to pay for what we are worth or another possibility is that they don't want to underpay an experienced designer. Perhaps starting our own company is the answer.

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iBelieveinMiracles in San Clemente, California

11 months ago

You know what? That may be the best idea I heard thus far if we don't want to learn web design, want to start our own firms, or freelance for hagglers. I wonder how much those Graphic Designer seekers earn over at the CreativeCircle. I may even dare to believe that they may earn way more than I ever have and may get commission as well. Nothing wrong with hiring younger talent, getting commission of them, and getting payed to see what we are competing against.

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Old Skool Designer in Franklin, Tennessee

11 months ago

After being a print/web designer for nearly 30 years, I'm now looking to move entirely out of the industry for the reasons many here have already stated. I too give away my talent/skills to non-profits but find that few for-profits are willing to pay a fair price for creative and effective ideas. I'm lucky to get half my regular fees for the same work I did 15 years go. There's simply too many who are happy to settle for the $79 logo, "pick a template and you're up" free website places and the crowd-sourcing sites.

I taught at the college level a few years ago which was fun for a while but paid little. I'm now 51 with two kids in college and needing to make a transition to another career for the next phase of my life.

After three months of searching, I'm no closer to finding a new career. Though I have years of experience in project organization and management, all Project Manager positions require degrees in business. I've considered starting my own business (unrelated to design) but most take a lot of money to get started. I'm even open to part-time work if I could find anything that paid over $10 an hour.

Sorry to add another downer story to the thread but, I'm guessing, that's why we're all here. :)

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Old Skool Designer in Franklin, Tennessee

11 months ago

avg in Medford, Massachusetts said: The process of monetizing multiple 'talents' is difficult. There are a few people who are really gifted in multiple areas, but most artists spend a lot of time and resources focusing in one area. A great photographer may not be a great furniture maker. Sure, they can "learn", but just like going to back to school, they need to eat feed and cloth themselves during the process. In a competitive market for handmade products, I suspect that one needs to be great to succeed or offer a compelling marketing angle.

This is very true.

Over the past 15 years, I've had my own print/web company while teaching at a local college while being the landlord of a rental property. ;)

All are part-time jobs but, combined, kept the family fed. Now, the teaching gig is over which leaves a major void. Options are to either build back up the freelance business to pre-2000 levels (and everything's changed since then) or find a full-time job in the industry (no luck so far with that) or, bailing on the industry entirely and looking to go into a different career (no luck there yet either without returning to college for another degree).

I'm all for creating a new business from scratch but, as you said, money needs to be coming in NOW and it takes money to start a business. Creative or not, it's a real Catch 22 for many out there who find themselves over 50 in an industry that's declining rapidly.

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Calfornian in Hayward, California

11 months ago

iBelieveinMiracles in San Clemente, California said: I wonder how much those Graphic Designer seekers earn over at the CreativeCircle.

Creative Circle, assuming you mean the brokers, are a Robert Half company and the Half in his name has a lot of meaning in this case.

Anyways, just sign up on their website, don't go in for the interview and you'll get an email every day with something on it.

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DodgerCats in Encino, California

7 months ago

I posted 14 months ago about switching careers. I am so glad I did it. The opportunities available to me now are amazing, and I no longer have to worry about what the design field will be like in 10 years.

A person I know who owns her own successful small marketing business told me that there's a website she goes to whenever her clients need marketing materials. She pays a gal from the Philippines $3 an hour to create the marketing materials she needs. Apparently the gal she hires does great work in which her clients are happy with the product. She said to me,"Outsourcing is the future and businesses will continue to do this since it affects their bottom line." I was really upset when she first told me this and gave her the speech about how she should be giving these design jobs to our own people, and how she's adding to the outsourcing problem. However, as much as I hate hearing about outsourcing, she's right. The design industry will continue to have increased outsourcing. Those who choose to bury their heads in the sand are setting themselves up for a life filled with struggle.

Anyone who is thinking about a graphic design career- change fields while you can. Anyone who's thinking about whether to stay or leave the field, all I can say is that leaving the field is the best decision I have ever made.

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DodgerCats in Encino, California

7 months ago

Fiverr dot com will be the end of the creative industry. That's the site the gal I know uses for her $3 an hour designer.

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Waylon in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

7 months ago

I can't imagine that $3 design is anything near meaningful or even effective.

I think people go into graphic design because they like to "make things pretty" or think that it is an easy job. If you're a rockstar design your talent will get noticed, you just have to be willing to take chances and move to different cities for awhile.

Truly passionate designers will find good paying gigs. Talent gets noticed and dedication gets you paid.

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Calfornian in Hayward, California

7 months ago

$3 in another country is probably like $30 here. I've seen some really lousy work from other countries but it's not all lousy work.

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JohnDoeHemmingWay in New York, New York

7 months ago

I also need a career change from graphic design. What jobs are more secure there days? Anyone?

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JohnDoeHemmingWay in New York, New York

7 months ago

DodgerCats in Encino, California said: I posted 14 months ago about switching careers. I am so glad I did it. The opportunities available to me now are amazing, and I no longer have to worry about what the design field will be like in 10 years.

A person I know who owns her own successful small marketing business told me that there's a website she goes to whenever her clients need marketing materials. She pays a gal from the Philippines $3 an hour to create the marketing materials she needs. Apparently the gal she hires does great work in which her clients are happy with the product. She said to me,"Outsourcing is the future and businesses will continue to do this since it affects their bottom line." I was really upset when she first told me this and gave her the speech about how she should be giving these design jobs to our own people, and how she's adding to the outsourcing problem. However, as much as I hate hearing about outsourcing, she's right. The design industry will continue to have increased outsourcing. Those who choose to bury their heads in the sand are setting themselves up for a life filled with struggle.

Anyone who is thinking about a graphic design career- change fields while you can. Anyone who's thinking about whether to stay or leave the field, all I can say is that leaving the field is the best decision I have ever made.

What career change did you make? What do you do now?

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JohnDoeHemmingWay in New York, New York

7 months ago

I am a man in my early 50s. I can't do this anymore. I can't make a living doing graphics. PLEASE... DOES ANYONE HAVE A SUGGESTION FOR A CAREER CHANGE?

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Better.luck.next.time in Hudson, New York

7 months ago

If I knew, I'd tell you. I'm in the same boat, except I'm a few months shy of my 55th birthday.

Looks like people have recommended accounting and the health field.

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JohnDoeHemmingWay in New York, New York

7 months ago

Better.luck.next.time in Hudson, New York said: If I knew, I'd tell you. I'm in the same boat, except I'm a few months shy of my 55th birthday.

Looks like people have recommended accounting and the health field.

I doubt I would be good at accounting. How do I get into the health field? lol

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HSTeach in Iowa

7 months ago

I advise high school students. The fastest way to get into health care is to become a CNA. It takes 75 contact hours and a skills test. It will cost approximately $500 for this. Most students get this done in less than 2 months. CNA's start at about $12 an hour. You can then segue into RN and then BSN.

Part of the reason there are so many CNA jobs is they tend to be in nursing homes and there is heavy lifting. My daughter had a friend who got to practice as a nurse for 2 months until a 500 pound man fell on her...

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JohnDoeHemmingWay in New York, New York

7 months ago

HSTeach in Iowa said: I advise high school students. The fastest way to get into health care is to become a CNA. It takes 75 contact hours and a skills test. It will cost approximately $500 for this. Most students get this done in less than 2 months. CNA's start at about $12 an hour. You can then segue into RN and then BSN.

Part of the reason there are so many CNA jobs is they tend to be in nursing homes and there is heavy lifting. My daughter had a friend who got to practice as a nurse for 2 months until a 500 pound man fell on her...

What is a CNA?

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JohnDoeHemmingWay in New York, New York

7 months ago

JohnDoeHemmingWay in New York, New York said: What is a CNA?

Oh, it's a Certified Nurse Assistant.

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Bluetea in Texas

7 months ago

HSTeach in Iowa said: Part of the reason there are so many CNA jobs is they tend to be in nursing homes and there is heavy lifting. My daughter had a friend who got to practice as a nurse for 2 months until a 500 pound man fell on her...

My niece started that way and says that was the hardest job she ever had and she was in her 20's then.

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inlimbo in Redmond, Oregon

7 months ago

HSTeach in Iowa said: I advise high school students. The fastest way to get into health care is to become a CNA. It takes 75 contact hours and a skills test. It will cost approximately $500 for this. Most students get this done in less than 2 months. CNA's start at about $12 an hour. You can then segue into RN and then BSN.

Part of the reason there are so many CNA jobs is they tend to be in nursing homes and there is heavy lifting. My daughter had a friend who got to practice as a nurse for 2 months until a 500 pound man fell on her...

I have two friends that are RNs. Both are having a hard time finding full time work. The field is saturated they say in almost every area of the country. There is a demand for specialty RNs in surgery, dialysis, or labor and delivery who have a BSN. You need at least 5 years of experience at a big hospital. There is still some job growth going on for CNAs.

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Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

7 months ago

JohnDoeHemmingWay in New York, New York said: I am a man in my early 50s. I can't do this anymore. I can't make a living doing graphics. PLEASE... DOES ANYONE HAVE A SUGGESTION FOR A CAREER CHANGE?

Does your spouse know of any jobs through friends, coworkers, relatives, ...etc...?

At the hospital I work the ER has EMTs. Maybe your local community college has classes for EMT training.

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Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

7 months ago

Loss prevention officer at retail store, get your CDL and drive a truck, maybe LPN nurse,....?

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Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

7 months ago

Pharmacy technician, car mechanic, HVAC....?

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JohnDoeHemmingWay in New York, New York

7 months ago

Thanks. I couldn't stomach being an EMT. It would be exciting but I can't handle bleeding suffering people. I would love to be a nurse. Once again, I don't know if it's for me. Someone told me I would make a great nurse for people with mental problems. She was serious about it. I probably would. Car mechanic? no. I would be terrible at that. Driving is a definite possibility since I drove in the past. Pharmacy technician? That sounds interesting.

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Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

7 months ago

Pharmacy techs that do the chemo compounding make decent money.

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Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

7 months ago

See my post about biomed repair with 2 year associates degree in electronics.

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Calfornian in Hayward, California

7 months ago

JohnDoeHemmingWay in New York, New York said: Thanks. I couldn't stomach being an EMT. It would be exciting but I can't handle bleeding suffering people.

It's hard work too. Long hours, not great pay, at least in California, and a lot of time sitting in a running ambulance in a parking lot, but, you get to be a hero sometimes and it's one path to becoming a fireman.

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Calam in San Jose, California

6 months ago

DodgerCats in Encino, California said: Fiverr dot com will be the end of the creative industry. That's the site the gal I know uses for her $3 an hour designer .

That is one of the saddest things I have seen in a while. But I question large corporations going this route, honestly. I can't imagine one of these $5 an hour designers going to a press check, checking copy, or putting the time in to make sure that everything is done correctly. This might fly for one offs but a company that needs designs frequently and in their 'voice' I would think (hope) that they'd stick to in-house people like myself.

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Calam in San Jose, California

6 months ago

JohnDoeHemmingWay in New York, New York said: Thanks. I couldn't stomach being an EMT . It would be exciting but I can't handle bleeding suffering people. I would love to be a nurse. Once again, I don't know if it's for me. Someone told me I would make a great nurse for people with mental problems. She was serious about it. I probably would. Car mechanic? no. I would be terrible at that. Driving is a definite possibility since I drove in the past. Pharmacy technician? That sounds interesting.

Wouldn't you be dealing with bleeding and suffering people as a nurse though?

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AnnoyedUnemployedandFrustated in Mount Vernon, New York

5 months ago

Frankensense in Warwick, Rhode Island said: When I was younger I thought I wanted to be a doctor - so I decided to become a candy striper at the local hospital . I too had thought that going into medicine was going to be a wonderful and fulfilling job choice...until I had to see the realities of it. Do you have a strong stomach? Great, you're an excellent match for medicine. Do you mind cleaning up fecal matter? You have no issues with it? Great, you are an excellent match for medicine. Would you like to see this 2 inch deep bedsore?

While going to school -for graphic design - I worked for a PI attorney . I got to hear potential clients go on and on about deep bedsores, infections and wounds. I got to see pictures of what happened to someone whose doctor didn't act fast enough. It's hard to see.

I bring all this up because..it is super easy to say that the medical field is the best option, but until you've been around it in a serious way you just cannot make that call. Thus, I am fine sticking with graphic design . I'm not expecting to make large sums of money, I'm just expecting to work in a field that I love.

Thank you for bringing this up. My mother is struggling as a nurse right now, earning way less than she should be and it bothers me to see these comments, romanticizing the healthcare field. It ignores the reality that we're really dealing with an economic crisis right now. Doctors are no more respected than designers, really: we live in a country where people refuse to have their children vaccinated, and laugh at the science field. Everything is politicized and everyone has an agenda.

Someone said it before and it's the truth: you wanna change the market? You wanna change the world? Good, start your own company. Infiltrate it from within. I am young, unemployed and I have two degrees in Web and Interactive Design. If we have it so easy, why are so many of us finding it hard to find work outside of internships?

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AnnoyedUnemployedandFrustated in Mount Vernon, New York

5 months ago

iBelieveinMiracles in San Clemente, California said: You know what? That may be the best idea I heard thus far if we don't want to learn web design , want to start our own firms, or freelance for hagglers. I wonder how much those Graphic Designer seekers earn over at the CreativeCircle. I may even dare to believe that they may earn way more than I ever have and may get commission as well. Nothing wrong with hiring younger talent, getting commission of them, and getting payed to see what we are competing against.

Are you kidding with this?

Creative Circle is a joke. If you look them up, you'll find an Indeed thread that goes on for several pages about how bad they are. And those places are just part of the problem of what's happening with the economy. They don't research the clients they work for and they steal money from young designers and poorly prep them for the jobs. They send the wrong people out all the time, spam emails and don't respond to inquiries at all. They hire awful recruiters who have no knowledge of the field, and then pay them commission rates. Any company worth their salt is not going to waste time with a recruiting agency because they have their own HR people, but if they do, they won't go to Creative Circle, they'll go to places like Aquent, Creative Group (Very big maybe on that one), or Artisan, and that's if they do at all. Like I said, normally big name places won't even need a recruiting agency. They have people dropping in from underneath the floorboard or the ceiling, waiting to work for them.

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