Im 29 years old and i have no idea what i want to do with my life

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Beth in Plano, TX

57 months ago

Lets face it, 95% of working people in the USA hate their job but since it pays the bills they drag themselves out of bed every day to go to work. I'm one of those people that dread my job but I have another 20 years to work.

Every person dreams of a perfect career.... very few actually live it. But for the time being I will just keep my mouth shut at work and collect a paycheck.

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Beth in Plano, TX

57 months ago

Where will you move?

Didn't you say that you wanted to be in NY closer to your dad.

I hope whatever you decide to do it works out.

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ADDscrub in Canyon Country, California

45 months ago

Does anyone else see anything wrong with this? Why is no one else furious at the concept of living in a world where you are forced to do a job that you hate, just to pay off some bills that you are forced to pay?

I've never held a job over about a year and a half, and every time it's because I just get sick of the job. It pours over into my personal life, I get deeply depressed and lose interest in EVERYTHING, and inevitably just trudge through work un-enthusiastically until I can't take it anymore and put in my two weeks, or they let me go. The following time spent unemployed, I manage to fill my head with ideas of the success and happiness which has, thus far, eluded me, until I build myself up enough so that my next job can slowly tear me down, back into this hole of depression.

"Ever since I started working ,every day has been worse than the one before. That means each time you see me, that's on the worst day of my life." - Office Space

Great flick. I feel your feel, Peter Gibbons.

How do we change this? Or is this just the future mankind has laid out for itself. 1% of the worlds population will be kept in lavish luxury, another 12% will manage to stay happy because they've miraculously found a career doing what they love, while the other 87& of us are screwed...Passed between employers like used records, on and off various anti-depressants that keep us just sane enough that we don't go postal, on our office or ourselves, and hoping that our children will SOMEHOW find a way to do it better than we did, but secretly knowing that they're doomed to the same fate as us, because they weren't born into old money.

I hate the world....

OMG! Would you believe that I have a job? And that I work in "Workforce and Career Development"? Yeah, no $#!t, I'm a job developer! It's my job to help people find jobs! HA! What a world, huh?

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lakesia in Bronx, New York

44 months ago

Nick in Somerville, Massachusetts said: Thanks, Beth. I am looking at the NYC area. It is stupid expensive, though. To be honest, I'd move anywhere that had a good job waiting for me. I was looking through New Mexico listings, earlier. I just want good, solid work that isn't going to lay me off a year later, something I can build around.

I wouldn't come to nyc Ive been here 2 years and its crazy expensive.

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Jennifer Hinds in Phoenix, Arizona

37 months ago

Why don't you get a job with the State as a Social Worker?

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LifeIsntElsewhere in South Bend, Indiana

36 months ago

Look at society objectively: what is it. Society is a natural phenomenon which has arisen out of the cauldron of Earth's environments. It serves to sustain people in the flesh at the cost of tangible and intangible things we must sacrifice. This is what it is. Society demands sacrifice.

Society is a giant dragon made of cells of human lives. Please the dragon, earn rewards; anger the dragon, incur wrath. Avoid the dragon and, hey, you are on your own. Your choice.

I come to the dragon when I need some help, scratch his belly then take my earned wealth and invest it in my own life, in my own society, the world of my own creation.

We are not an island. We cannot survive alone. We need others. Ask not why others don't pay you to do what you love but rather ask 'what can you do for them?'

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Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

35 months ago

Halo,

Just do your best and try to stay focused.

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Completely Broke and Broken in Cleveland, Ohio

35 months ago

You're doing a lot better than most. Keep at it; best of luck.

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Raj in Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom

31 months ago

Glad to see many people having similar mental states.

I always think of stuffs like : "I wish there was a way by which the Govt in every country could cover 50% money needs(bills-food,housing,shopping) of all people in the world and then the rest we make by working like 2 or 3 days a week and rest of the week we get to enjoy!"Each person working on whatever they want.

I realised one particular aspect in this thought which is that we never get satisfied with what we have and always wants more and more . We might think if we get lot of money and lot of free time we will be awesomely satisfied but even then we might not!

Just a thought , im in same condition as the OP!

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Karl in Lakeland, Florida

31 months ago

I'm currently in the same boat as a lot of you guys. I graduated with a general social science degree last December (2013). I didn't know what I wanted to major in, but I wanted to earn a degree, so I chose something general that would hopefully keep my options open. Unfortunately, I've still yet to find a job. I have a variety of things I'm interested in, and could see myself doing for a living, but for some reason or another nothing has worked out yet. I've come across a few job openings that sound pretty appealing, but I always seem to hit a roadblock or find a negative aspect to them (e.g. insufficient pay, lack of qualification, etc.).

The only two permanent, full time jobs that I have worked in the past - commercial painting and waiting/serving - have been unenjoyable, to say the least. I have the option of settling for a job as a telemarketer or salesperson, which could provide me with a decent income, but would undoubtedly be boring. I could also do something that makes me happy, like volunteer or missionary work, but then I would make little to no income. Ideally, I would like to have a job in the middle of the road that is relatively enjoyable and is not too low-paying.

Unfortunately, I'm beginning to lose hope. Part of me is starting to wonder if my aspirations are just too unrealistic or highly improbable. don't want the unhappiness of my work life to interfere and negatively affect my personal and life, and the lives of my future wife and potential children. I don't know if I'm being pathetic and whiney, or if I legitimately have an argument here. I don't know what the purpose of this rant is or what point I'm trying to make. I suppose I'd like to think that this message will allow other people in similar situations to relate and know that they aren't alone in their current predicaments. I hope and pray that we can find happiness in our current and/or future jobs.

Thanks for taking the time to read while I vent. :) God bless.

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Jay in Chicago, Illinois

29 months ago

I get it. I didn't know what I wanted to do in life after college so I went to law school. Not because I am passionate about law, but because I was good at school and it would supposedly "open a lot of doors." Now I am an attorney. I have about $75,000 in student loans (which is NOT BAD considering most people in my position), and, at 29, I make what I would be making if I had started a career at 24 instead of paying for law school for three years. And while I keep fighting to acknowledge it, being a lawyer sucks. At least it isn't for me. Not so far at least.

My advice to anyone would be DO NOT go to grad school unless you are sure it will take you where you want. Or you are on scholarship. I do not feel accomplished. And I still have not found whatever passion I need to find. I keep my hopes up that something will work out and I will find the job I really like, but I feel like sitting and waiting isn't going to get me there. I just don't know what steps to take, or if I missed the boat completely.

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Paul in Mesquite, Texas

29 months ago

Jay in Chicago, Illinois said: I get it. I didn't know what I wanted to do in life after college so I went to law school. Not because I am passionate about law, but because I was good at school and it would supposedly "open a lot of doors." Now I am an attorney . I have about $75,000 in student loans (which is NOT BAD considering most people in my position), and, at 29, I make what I would be making if I had started a career at 24 instead of paying for law school for three years. And while I keep fighting to acknowledge it, being a lawyer sucks. At least it isn't for me. Not so far at least.

My advice to anyone would be DO NOT go to grad school unless you are sure it will take you where you want. Or you are on scholarship. I do not feel accomplished. And I still have not found whatever passion I need to find. I keep my hopes up that something will work out and I will find the job I really like, but I feel like sitting and waiting isn't going to get me there. I just don't know what steps to take, or if I missed the boat completely.

Read the book "48 days to the work you love" or listen to the audiobook or podcasts. It has been very helpful for me thus far. I just started listening to them myself and it has revealed some very backward perspectives that I held about work. I hope it helps you as well.

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xboxer in Tucson, Arizona

29 months ago

Paul in Mesquite, Texas said: Read the book "48 days to the work you love" or listen to the audiobook or podcasts. It has been very helpful for me thus far. I just started listening to them myself and it has revealed some very backward perspectives that I held about work. I hope it helps you as well.

What if there are NO jobs in what he loves? That seems to be the problem with most professions right now. No jobs. The problem isn't finding what one is able to do--it's lack of jobs.

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xboxer in Tucson, Arizona

29 months ago

Jay in Chicago, Illinois said: I get it. I didn't know what I wanted to do in life after college so I went to law school. Not because I am passionate about law, but because I was good at school and it would supposedly "open a lot of doors." Now I am an attorney . I have about $75,000 in student loans (which is NOT BAD considering most people in my position), and, at 29, I make what I would be making if I had started a career at 24 instead of paying for law school for three years. And while I keep fighting to acknowledge it, being a lawyer sucks. At least it isn't for me. Not so far at least.

My advice to anyone would be DO NOT go to grad school unless you are sure it will take you where you want. Or you are on scholarship. I do not feel accomplished. And I still have not found whatever passion I need to find. I keep my hopes up that something will work out and I will find the job I really like, but I feel like sitting and waiting isn't going to get me there. I just don't know what steps to take, or if I missed the boat completely.

I agree with what you said here.

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Thunderhammer in Richmond, Virginia

28 months ago

You know, I have been reading this post and I have the same opinion as many of you. I am 25 years old, living a generally unfulfilling life and stuck working a $#it-tastic job that I can't stand, ONLY because I have to pay the bills and support my family. Crappy minimum-wage jobs just don't cut it for those of us supporting a family.

But I've always wanted to do something with my life, something I could enjoy, at least on a moderate level. And as for that one guy on the first page of this post that said something about "starting his own business with $300, blah-blah-blah", get a life bro, luck doesn't happen to everyone.

But sometimes it isn't just a matter of FINDING a job you like, it's KNOWING what you want to do. And I do believe that's my main issue. How can I decide what I wish to pursue when I know that everything is "rigged"? That everything has a stupid little "catch" that makes a lot of otherwise fun careers unenjoyable?

And that's my question to this forum:

How do I find what I want to pursue in life and still be successful? At the risk of sounding greedy, I want to finally do something for me rather than always doing for others because I "have to".

(And I'm not trying to be "philisophical", that was a legitamate question.)

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Riot in Massachusetts

28 months ago

Thunderhammer in Richmond, Virginia said:
How do I find what I want to pursue in life and still be successful? At the risk of sounding greedy, I want to finally do something for me rather than always doing for others because I "have to".

Very few people I know woke up the day after high school and said "Ok, got it! I know what I'm going to do for the rest of my life." Some of my engineer friends might fit this mold, having found really cool careers that fit their lifelong interests. On the other hand, I'm almost certain that my brother and his wife both hate what they do, but their bills are paid and they can find meaning in their lives outside of work.

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Better.luck in Albany, New York

28 months ago

Riot in Massachusetts said: Very few people I know woke up the day after high school and said "Ok, got it! I know what I'm going to do for the rest of my life." Some of my engineer friends might fit this mold, having found really cool careers that fit their lifelong interests. On the other hand, I'm almost certain that my brother and his wife both hate what they do, but their bills are paid and they can find meaning in their lives outside of work.

Yes, I think many people steer through life this way. Some even manage to pull their hobbies into small components of their jobs to make a day or two more enjoyable.

I suppose the other answer would be too hook up to a job that has coworkers with the personality that you like...curious? hardworking? decent sense of humor? Etc.

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Better.luck in Albany, New York

28 months ago

Thunderhammer in Richmond, Virginia said: You know, I have been reading this post and I have the same opinion as many of you. I am 25 years old, living a generally unfulfilling life and stuck working a $#it-tastic job that I can't stand, ONLY because I have to pay the bills and support my family. Crappy minimum-wage jobs just don't cut it for those of us supporting a family.

But I've always wanted to do something with my life, something I could enjoy, at least on a moderate level. And as for that one guy on the first page of this post that said something about "starting his own business with $300, blah-blah-blah", get a life bro, luck doesn't happen to everyone.

But sometimes it isn't just a matter of FINDING a job you like, it's KNOWING what you want to do. And I do believe that's my main issue. How can I decide what I wish to pursue when I know that everything is "rigged"? That everything has a stupid little "catch" that makes a lot of otherwise fun careers unenjoyable?

And that's my question to this forum:

How do I find what I want to pursue in life and still be successful? At the risk of sounding greedy, I want to finally do something for me rather than always doing for others because I "have to".

(And I'm not trying to be "philisophical", that was a legitamate question.)

When I figured out what I might want to do, I picked up small, freelance jobs to prove that I could do the job and to test whether I liked it. The down side is that I sometimes pulled all-nighters to do this. At age 40, I was a full time working mom with 5 year old twins and would sometimes stay up all night to do freelance jobs. It took me about three years to transition into the occupation I loved.

If you are 25 years old, I bet it would be easier for you, unless you are a single mom. Then, it would be rather hellish, but still possible.

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Thunderhammer in Richmond, Virginia

28 months ago

Better.luck in Albany, New York said: When I figured out what I might want to do, I picked up small, freelance jobs to prove that I could do the job and to test whether I liked it. The down side is that I sometimes pulled all-nighters to do this. At age 40, I was a full time working mom with 5 year old twins and would sometimes stay up all night to do freelance jobs. It took me about three years to transition into the occupation I loved.

If you are 25 years old, I bet it would be easier for you, unless you are a single mom. Then, it would be rather hellish, but still possible.

The problem with that, at least for me, would be that picking up freelance jobs means that the income would be unreliable, unless the work kept rolling in. I was actually considering getting into the culinary arts, as it is a big interest of mine. The only thing is that I've heard that those in the culinary arts are generally underpaid for what they do, at least in the lower levels.

Does anybody have any insight with starting in the culinary arts, and if so how would I get started?

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Es777 in Los Angeles, California

28 months ago

Fillinthegap in Reno, Nevada said: Good for you! I see we have another personality with all the answers. I'll just sit back and listen.

Hahaha

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Thaimaster in Sarasota, Florida

28 months ago

29 here and no idea why the job market is so tight, rigid, frigid and ridiculously hard to get any type of job out there today. It makes me just want to wait out the storm and do nothing for 5-10 years until the government takes it upon itself to fix this pathetic economic slowdown/turn-down that never seems to cease.

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Mr. A

26 months ago

Perhaps all of us Twenty eight something year olds all need to get together and come up with solutions
Even just to vent ya know? I do feel like our generation got the bad end of things, but there's always hope. I come to realize that even when you're down in the ditch you can keep going. Say no to those who would try to control you and manipulate you. Say no and take control! Take control of the ship and kick the evil doers out. Declare mutiny. Don't ask for control, courageously take it away. Some people cannot be talked into surrendering their power. It must be taken from them.

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xboxer in Tucson, Arizona

26 months ago

Eehirm in Anonymous Proxy said: EXACTLY!
I recently told my parent that and that was how she exactly replied. I mean, this is what life has come to? 'Work your heart out and becoming a ''life-money-slave''? Parents' famous ''wise words'' : Oh, that's just life.
So by your standard you are telling me being a money slave and work for all your life of some jobs that you're definitely do not wish to do while paying taxes to the government called ''LIFE''?? That is not life!

Ultimately you will find yourself drown deep into materialism and buy things that are useless to conciliate your depressing life, taking all sorts of Anti-depressant pills because you realize you life SUCKS! Then it will be to late to turn back.

As for those who encouraging by saying ''Hang in there, Keep at it.'' Shame on you. That is not the solution.
Seeing all these people whine about that they have made a mistake when they didn't take the action to do what they wanted to is an example for us not to made the same mistake as they did.

Good luck to you all.

We aren't meant to live like this. That's why it feels awful.
We are meant to get up when it's light out, go out and smell fresh air, see the dew on the grass, and work the soil. Truly.
Because this technology is just going to work us like slaves into the ground.

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C_dizz in Naperville, Illinois

24 months ago

I made an for the sole purpose of telling you your comment made my day. I live in st louis and literally everybody I know or meet has NO goals. None. They just muck through totally ok with having no real job. Hating what they do and just "dealing with it". I would greatly appreciate it if you had any advice on how to change this. What you would recommend OR what you're doing of yourself about it because I'm lost at the matter.

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EconGuy in Lawndale, North Carolina

24 months ago

I personally think everyone is being robbed of their time on this earth funding a plutocracy.. But that's the only way to earn a living..

Even self-employment and software licensing is dependent on people.. Those are the closest thing there is to escaping other than homelessness..

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jm357 in Columbia, Illinois

20 months ago

ADDscrub in Canyon Country, California said: Does anyone else see anything wrong with this? Why is no one else furious at the concept of living in a world where you are forced to do a job that you hate, just to pay off some bills that you are forced to pay?

I've never held a job over about a year and a half, and every time it's because I just get sick of the job. It pours over into my personal life, I get deeply depressed and lose interest in EVERYTHING, and inevitably just trudge through work un-enthusiastically until I can't take it anymore and put in my two weeks, or they let me go. The following time spent unemployed, I manage to fill my head with ideas of the success and happiness which has, thus far, eluded me, until I build myself up enough so that my next job can slowly tear me down, back into this hole of depression.

"Ever since I started working ,every day has been worse than the one before. That means each time you see me, that's on the worst day of my life." - Office Space

Great flick. I feel your feel, Peter Gibbons.

How do we change this? Or is this just the future mankind has laid out for itself. 1% of the worlds population will be kept in lavish luxury, another 12% will manage to stay happy because they've miraculously found a career doing what they love, while the other 87& of us are screwed...Passed between employers like used records

I hate the world....

This sounds just like me! I just turned 31 and been freakin out for 12 years trying to figure out why I can't seem to find an enjoyable career that I can just deal with. I just left another job in which I worked myself up to being supervisor in a career field I actually like, but can't seem to like my job because upper management had everything so screwed up. It's like they enjoy setting up the employees for failure everyday. Overworked and understaffed, and always the peon's fault.

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shingami in Chicago, Illinois

20 months ago

C_dizz in Naperville, Illinois said: I made an for the sole purpose of telling you your comment made my day. I live in st louis and literally everybody I know or meet has NO goals. None. They just muck through totally ok with having no real job. Hating what they do and just "dealing with it". I would greatly appreciate it if you had any advice on how to change this. What you would recommend OR what you're doing of yourself about it because I'm lost at the matter.

This is exactly me! I have been mucking around for the last 20 years. Of course now that I'm not even my 30's anymore, it hit me like a ton of bricks that I have done nothing with my life all these years. I'm tired of going from one job I don't want to another and barely making enough money to even enjoy life. The years go by so fast and I have no life to show for it. "Dream jobs" are pretty much non-existent and we settle for something we can tolerate and sadly, I can't even find that! That is how bad things are.

And as far as materialism goes, well, you should be able to buy material things because they do make you happy, regardless of what some may say. We all know there are things we see that we want that will make us happy, we are not all living like Ghandi. Being able to just go right out and buy a car or a PS4 or book a vacation would make me very happy. Employers and companies just want indentured servants. You need to work to many years in this world to be so miserable. When I think about some jobs I've had, the idea of staying there 40 or 50 years make me want to jump off a bridge. Sick of this life.

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seth uk in London, United Kingdom

18 months ago

Yeah you said it friend! I'm 29 and have been struggling with this problem for some time.
The thing is education means very little, my sister has a 1st class masters degree in chemical engineering and no one will employ her because she is over qualified!
Its a sad world. I dont feel satisfied in any job. The longest I lasted in a job was about 10months.
I honestly think this whole way of life is mass producing depression. like you said most of us are not fortunate enough to find work we enjoy so we're basically modern day slave labourers.

Here in the uk the situation is terrible. We're stuck on an island about the size of florida and its hard to get away from people. i want to get away and start a new life in Alaska. i'd like to hunt and trap and live the way i want. But there is no way for me to get to Alaska..so i must persist with my depression until it kills me..which probably isn't going to be very long

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2Legit in Cincinnati, Ohio

18 months ago

Thunderhammer in Richmond, Virginia said: The problem with that, at least for me, would be that picking up freelance jobs means that the income would be unreliable, unless the work kept rolling in. I was actually considering getting into the culinary arts, as it is a big interest of mine. The only thing is that I've heard that those in the culinary arts are generally underpaid for what they do, at least in the lower levels.

Does anybody have any insight with starting in the culinary arts, and if so how would I get started?

If there's a cooking school near you, do they have classes? Do you know anyone getting married/having a Bar/Bat Mitzvah - if you are confident with cooking/baking, you can offer to do the event at a discount in exchange for getting business cards printed... word of mouth could get you clients... Taking culinary classes could help you by giving you some legitimacy, instead of just saying "I cook well" to saying "I studied under such and such chef"... it might introduce you to some instructors who can mentor you on starting your own business on the side... maybe you could go part time at your current job while you attend school at night?

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