Is IT an impossible field to get into? in my situation.

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (24)

Rob Ouellete in Toronto, Ontario

33 months ago

Hello there, previously I completed an associate's degree in electronics and have found some work in electronics manufacturing. The pay is around 12- 15 bucks an hour, but stable for now. For now because I am worried if manufacturing disappear one day due to outsourcing.

So instead I have starting taking IT courses in college. But after reading online opinions on IT industry, I wonder if I just jumped from pan into the grill if I am looking for a better opportunity?

I can write and learn code okay, but I will be honest and admit that I am not the cream of the crop. I am average at best in terms of IT skills. Setting up domains and active directories and putting together pre-made code from libraries seems to be where I have hit the ceiling in terms of computer skills. But I hear that moderate level IT jobs are outsourced and it seems the WWW is barraged with endless lists of reasons to avoid the IT field also. Also the starting wages for the junior guys don't make much more than what I was making in my other place.

Some people may say that "if you are good you can win in the IT field". But my skills in IT are still average at best. My marks for programming courses are in the mid 60s or so.

Am I making the wrong choice by going into IT? Would I be wasting time and money to start in the IT industry now from scratch even though the pay and stability won't be better than where I was before?

Aside from big-name media sites and obsessed computer folks or those that made it big, there is practically nothing online that says anything positive about this field. The very successful ones tell me that I have to be almost obsessed to succeed in computers. Like keeping up to date with technologies that you may or may not be using.

Also the typical IT job postings don't seem to be realistically achievable. While I do procrastinate sometimes, the requirements for even junior programmers or tech support is off the wall.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

Bluetea in Texas

33 months ago

You want to run from IT. Too many problems with this field now.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Go Getter in Rushville, Illinois

32 months ago

If this were the early to mind 90's and the Y2K craze was heating up I'd say stick it out. I talked to people who were nothing special coming out of college with IT degrees back then getting nice cushy jobs. Nowadays schools are everywhere and churning out grads of all kinds. Leave IT and never look back. The only people getting fat and happy off this are the schools.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No Reply - Report abuse

Bluetea in Texas

32 months ago

Go Getter in Rushville, Illinois said: If this were the early to mind 90's and the Y2K craze was heating up I'd say stick it out. I talked to people who were nothing special coming out of college with IT degrees back then getting nice cushy jobs. Nowadays schools are everywhere and churning out grads of all kinds. Leave IT and never look back. The only people getting fat and happy off this are the schools.

Ha! I agree. College is an industry like any other.

Even if you major in IT, by the time you get out, you'd be 4 years out-of-date. Pass on this.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Rashid Raja in boonton, New Jersey

32 months ago

well IT industry has changed because of stupid people entering into the market at all levels (Managers , hiring ,technical ) who don't know what different fields are in IT . they are trying to hire people with multiple skill set forgetting that its impossible to have so many skills and have perfection in them. they forced candidates to lie on resumes .e.g In my Linux system administrator interview with a major Internet company
i faced 30 Networking questions ? i know answers to all of them but i still wonder why a Linux system admin configure RIP on cisco router ???

another very important factor is managers are not considering talent .they are looking for very solid background at every level ,entry to exp , with senior level positions its fine .at entry / junior level one should not expect solid background .overall its a messed up field now a days .
i.e must have Orcale , Linux , Virtualization , scripting , Java , C++
nice to have Cisco routing and switching ,
Security certification will be a major plus

i sometime wonder people who post these type of posting have any idea about IT or not ?? my advise STAY AWAY AND FOCUS ON SOMETHING POSITIVE

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Bluetea in Texas

32 months ago

Rashid Raja in boonton, New Jersey said: well IT industry has changed because of stupid people entering into the market at all levels (Managers , hiring ,technical ) who don't know what different fields are in IT . they are trying to hire people with multiple skill set forgetting that its impossible to have so many skills and have perfection in them. they forced candidates to lie on resumes .e.g In my Linux system administrator interview with a major Internet company
i faced 30 Networking questions ? i know answers to all of them but i still wonder why a Linux system admin configure RIP on cisco router ???

another very important factor is managers are not considering talent .they are looking for very solid background at every level ,entry to exp , with senior level positions its fine .at entry / junior level one should not expect solid background .overall its a messed up field now a days .
i.e must have Orcale , Linux , Virtualization , scripting , Java , C++
nice to have Cisco routing and switching ,
Security certification will be a major plus

i sometime wonder people who post these type of posting have any idea about IT or not ?? my advise STAY AWAY AND FOCUS ON SOMETHING POSITIVE

I agree. they could care less about your talent or potential. They want very specific experience and they want somebody else to have paid for it.

STAY AWAY!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

CAT Droid in Washington, Illinois

32 months ago

Rashid Raja in boonton, New Jersey said:

i sometime wonder people who post these type of posting have any idea about IT or not ?? my advise STAY AWAY AND FOCUS ON SOMETHING POSITIVE

The people who post these types of jobs are simply clueless MBAs submitting job reqs to even more clueless HR droids.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

Underemployed Soul in Topeka, Kansas

32 months ago

It's really impossible to get into IT than it was in the late 1990s until 2000 and it's due to outsourcing and H1Bs. HR also put up these ridicuous 'dream lists' of job requirements in ads for IT employees. I tried my best to get into Computer Networking since January 2010. I have two worthless Computer Networking degrees and CompTIA A+ certification obtained from a local trade school. It is now two years later and I gave
up trying to get in that field. Every time I would apply or interview for IT jobs I could do, I would get rejected due to lack of experience, certifications, or a college degree from an accredited college.

Thanks to cloud computing, the Computer Networking could be done everywhere, even overseas. Well, I'm now in college and changing my field to something else. There is also gender discrimination in IT, so if you are a female or minority, male IT Managers won't hire you. I have a passion for Science since I was a kid so I'm majoring in Physics. I majored in Computer Science but it was the wrong major for me because I couldn't get a grasp on programming. There are Physicist jobs I can get that cannot be done overseas, and even if I don't get a Physicist job, I can still get a job in an office or something. I'm still young so I can change fields before it's too late.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Go Getter in Rushville, Illinois

32 months ago

Don't forget about age discrimination in IT. In some places anyone close to 40 is shown the door. Sure you may see 50-somethings working in IT in some instances. But those are most likely smaller companies that don't have to deal with an over sized HR department or middle-management bureaucracy. The one way to get in would be to have a time machine and go back to about 1990 or so. Then an A+ cert (if it even existed back then) would be your ticket to easy street. That is until someone from Calcutta or Bombay took over your job 15 years later.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (8) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

JBusciglio in Saint Petersburg, Florida

32 months ago

Not to sound snarky, but "IT" does not mean what the vast majority of people thinks it means. Understanding this comes from experience. Here is a clue, so as hopefully to encourage people who have a passion for the field, and not just looking for a dream ticket to a ship that has sailed long ago.

In school, you will learn all about technology. You will even learn about how to process information.

In the real world, you learn about the relationship between Information and Technology. "IT" is literally not enough to understand and work with the technology. You must also understand how to utilize that technology to process the very specific types of information that particular business deals with.

So many people coming from school have a strong focus on the technology. The focus needs to be on the information and the relationship between the two.

That is something that you learn from experience. Go to your next IT interview without experience and talk about what I just did, and you will see the eyes of the interviewer light up as FINALLY, a person with a college degree understands what they are looking for and didn't require experience to figure "IT" out.

Now if I could just get past my arrest in 2008, I'd be back to work in the "IT" field interviewing all these grads again. =)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

psx71 in Edmonton, Alberta

32 months ago

Okay, I'm new here so I'll ask.

Does the same go for Computer Science? Is Computer Science the same as IT? I really want to major in either Computer Science or Engineering, so I want to decide which one will provide me with a better and secure job in the future. I was thinking on being a Software Implementation Consultant, because it has travel which I LOVE, and it has an aspect of Software Engineering which I heard is in major demand at the moment.

So, can anyone help me?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Hotdiggity in Ajax, Ontario

32 months ago

Sad, but true.
The last "Software Implementation Consultant" I worked with was from Infosys.
He got to travel..all the way from India !

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

no work in Pensacola, Florida

22 months ago

Same here have an associates degree from accredited college and cant find work
AAS in Network Specialization. After reading these comments, im saying Damn !

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Californian in Pleasanton, California

22 months ago

JBusciglio in Saint Petersburg, Florida said: So many people coming from school have a strong focus on the technology. The focus needs to be on the information and the relationship between the two.

True, but every job req in the land is asking for specifics on a technology.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Californian in Pleasanton, California

22 months ago

I broke into IT from another field. I think I annoyed IT enough that they said "here's a job, do it yourself". I don't know if that can happen today, exactly.

I think it would still be possible to land a help desk gig and work your way up. It would be hard to do in most other areas though. Today there is a real gap between the very high end guys who are in-demand and pulling in North of 100K and the rest of us.

And you have to pick the right thing in the right place. JavaScript guys, the one's who fell in love with it for some godawful reason, whom we were laughing at 5 to 10 years ago, are being courted like royalty today in some parts of the country. Today you want to be in the mobile game, but, you had to be there 5 years ago to get the big money today. Today, you need to pick the next big winner so that in a few years you are that guy.

You have to be Nostradamus in this industry.

I'll just say that if you are very entrepreneurial, very, very good, in the right place, and very lucky it's still a field that you can find a way into.

By the way, kudos for your honest self-appraisal, that's hard for a lot of people but I'm guessing the grades hammer it home. :)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Californian in Pleasanton, California

22 months ago

Aw crap, I helped necro a dead thread.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

JBusciglio in Saint Petersburg, Florida

22 months ago

Californian in Pleasanton, California said: True, but every job req in the land is asking for specifics on a technology.

buzz words. you can't really get specific on a technology unless you know how it is being used. that's the catch 22. my point was, if the op is wanting to get in to IT, learn the information side of the equation and don't fret the technology side so much.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

SAS80 in Staunton, Virginia

22 months ago

JBusciglio in Saint Petersburg, Florida said: Not to sound snarky, but "IT" does not mean what the vast majority of people thinks it means. Understanding this comes from experience. Here is a clue, so as hopefully to encourage people who have a passion for the field, and not just looking for a dream ticket to a ship that has sailed long ago.

In school, you will learn all about technology. You will even learn about how to process information.

In the real world, you learn about the relationship between Information and Technology. "IT" is literally not enough to understand and work with the technology. You must also understand how to utilize that technology to process the very specific types of information that particular business deals with.

So many people coming from school have a strong focus on the technology. The focus needs to be on the information and the relationship between the two.

That is something that you learn from experience. Go to your next IT interview without experience and talk about what I just did, and you will see the eyes of the interviewer light up as FINALLY, a person with a college degree understands what they are looking for and didn't require experience to figure "IT" out.

Now if I could just get past my arrest in 2008, I'd be back to work in the "IT" field interviewing all these grads again. =)

I agree, I have a degree in IST, but I hate it and could never get a feel for it. It bored me and confused me. I say that if someone is going to go for a degree in IT, then they need to actually have an interest, not because the employment agency tells you that it will be the only field that is hiring in the area you live. I am planning on going back to school to become a Med Tech because I like it. If I don't get a job with this field I can at least say I tried on something I had passion for.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Phil04 in Tampa, Florida

22 months ago

I have to disagree with many of the posts here. I am an IT recruiter and have to say there are plenty of opportunities out there. I am actually working on making the transition into IT myself (I hold a civil engineering degree currently). The IT field, from my understanding, has one of the lowest unemployment rates of all professions.

To address the H1 comments, the only reason for so many IT professionals here on H1 visas is that there are not enough domestic professionals available to meet the demand. It is a simple matter of supply and demand. Companies typically do not pay any less for someone here on an H1 visa and most times would prefer someone on a W2 basis. More so for permanent jobs where they would have to pay to sponsor someone with a visa. When it comes to contracting, most candidates have to go through an employer, who of course takes a cut, negating any cost savings. It is really that simple. If there were enough people here who could do the job you would see a huge decrease in the number of IT professionals here on work visas.

Most W2 IT professionals who have a good attitude and work ethic and know enough to do their job are employed or are not on the market for very long. However, like any profession, those with bad attitudes and work ethic or who just don't have what it takes to do the job, won't have a job. Location does play a factor with some positions or technologies of course. You won't find many Java developer jobs in Montana.

More food for thought... the IT recruiting industry is a Multi-Billion dollar industry. If there was not a constant need for IT professionals or the market was flooded with eligible candidates who couldn't find jobs, I would be out of a job. Companies would easily be able to find people on their own. Again, remember, location can play a factor, but the jobs are out there. Also, keep an open mind regarding contracts.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (5) / No (13) Reply - Report abuse

JBusciglio in Saint Petersburg, Florida

22 months ago

Phil04 in Tampa, Florida said:
To address the H1 comments..

I will have to respectfully disagree with this assessment Phil. As an IT professional since the mid 90's, IT wages have stagnated for all but the highest skilled developers and admins. The glut of H1B's have driven wages in to the ground and the field is simply not as attractive as it once was.

You are a recruiter, take a look at the job requirements on a couple mid career mid level positions. 4 Years college, PLUS 4 years experience, PLUS a host of certs, PLUS a host of proprietary software, PLUS cross platform skills, PLUS no employment gaps, and on and on. And the reward? A nice cube in a smelly office making 35k a year. I am sorry Phil, the H1's can have it. Not interested any more.

Most big corps that do the major lifting in tech hiring have no clue about their technology needs, let alone the specific manager who is channeling what he should be paying his recruit into head hunters who also typically don't know the field OR the business.

So much easier for corps to pay small time business with expert skill to build the system for a 1 time albeit costly fee, and then train the H1's and entry level freshman to run it on the cheap. This represents the extreme disconnect between the I and the T

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (10) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Californian in Pleasanton, California

22 months ago

JBusciglio in Saint Petersburg, Florida said:
Now the I in technology, that is worth something. Give me a db that can sort 2 million products and find the 350,000 of them that can be discontinued and increase the yearly profit margin by 10%. THAT is the IT guy I want to hire. Any H1B can run a series of selects and mix and match data. But the information guy, he's gonna have a feel for the company and the customers. He'll come up with the ingenious way of ferreting out that data and teasing it to do things that no foreigner can do.

Is that still considered an IT function? That would almost certainly roll down to an analyst, the purchasing side or BI, if they had a BI function that did more than write reports. Heck, I don't think IT would even want to touch it with the way things are segmented today. They might task some poor guy with writing the SQL or a handful of reports but actually thinking about them seems way beyond the scope of it.

I guess you said that, didn't you. :)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

alan headrick in Pace, Florida

20 months ago

I tried for several years to get into IT and gave up. The entry level Help Desk they want 10 years experience in networking, Linux, windoze, masters degree in programming, commercial jet pilot license, underwater welding certification and able to work at $8.00 an hour, on call 24/7.

Good luck!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (12) / No (11) Reply - Report abuse

dakota in Lake Charles, Louisiana

5 months ago

let me tell you something these guys aren't, cause they don't know. receiving a degree in IT is POINTLESS. Its all about certifications. Look at nearly every job site. they ask for certification. take a few classes and earn a few certifications. Not crazy expensive, but they will qualify you for jobs if your current one fails. starting out i am getting paid 60k a year. I just got lucky. Average makes 40k starting off. after about 5-7 years 70k. Its not crazy hard. You don't need to know math. AT ALL. Go for it. its not super time consuming.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Nonetoday in chicago, Illinois

5 months ago

I'm in an area with many tech companies and I can tell you softwear engineers are in high demand and they are constantly approached by people from companies trying to poach them and they get all these perks that other people don't get. These are social media companies and start ups but those people make over six figures I can tell you that.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.