Master's degree in physics seeks real work

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Donald in Royal Oak, Michigan

63 months ago

KIIT School Of Rural Management. Admissi in New Delhi, India said: Guys....
Admissions are now open for two-year MBA (Agribusiness Management) programme from 2012-13 academic section along with its flagship (Rural Management).

Eligibility: Graduates in any discipline with minimum 50% marks or equivalent CGPA for MBA(RM) and Graduate in
Agriculture or any allied ¬eld with minimum 50% aggregate marks (or equivalent CGPA) for MBA(ABM)

Selection: Short-listing through IRMA Written Test scores or national level exams - CAT, XAT, MAT or TISS.
The shortlisted candidates will be called for GD/PI to Bhubaneswar/Bangalore/Delhi/Kolkatta/Mumbai.
For More details on admission check: www.ksrm.ac.in

Sadly this has become the reality in the US labor market especially in science and engineering, a bunch of Indians.

It's not bad enough that the jobs are leaving the country, but the ones that are here are being done by foreign workers on H1b visas.

Democrat or Republican, they care more about low wages for employers than keeping Americans employed...or more importantly keeping Americans in highly-technical fields.

Follow the money, that's why we're in a depression.

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X in Waterloo, Ontario

59 months ago

Hi everyone,

I've recently finished my Master's in physics in 2011. I decided not to do a PhD because I saw no future in what I was doing and the field in general. Basically no jobs outside of academia mixed with a high improbability of ever obtaining a tenured-faculty position. And professorships are not fun with all the committee work, editorial work, supervising, grant proposals, etc. While in my Masters I saw my dreams of a future in physics crushed by reality.

So I did what I thought best, to start a career as soon as I graduated. I was too busy with my thesis and research to look for work. I thought I could find something in programming or as a quant. Boy was I naive!

The doodoo hit the fan before I even graduated and as soon as I began my employment search. Basically I hit a wall of crushing reality when I went to a job fair and virtually no one was interested in my qualifications. And then began the search...

Seven months later I still have not landed a job above minimum wage. It seems despite my experience and qualifications, no one is hiring physics majors. It's because I'm applying to engineering and IT jobs that have plenty of experienced engineers and computer scientists. And the rare and few jobs in requiring a physics for something like technical writing likely has too many candidates. I'm now in financially shaky ground and I don't know what to do. Basically, my life is ruined, I never imagined myself barely scraping by and working dead-end jobs after so many years of internships, university, hard-work, and self-sacrifice.

And I'm not the only one. My friends and colleagues in physics all have similar stories or worse. A few went back to do degrees in engineering. One was smart enough to plan ahead by taking finance courses while still in grad school, studying for and writing certification exams. When he graduated he was getting requests for interviews and got a good job fairly quickly.

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Roberto in Eagle Pass, Texas

55 months ago

So this year I'm a senior in high school, and if senior year goes by as fast as junior year did I'm in big trouble. I don't know what college or university I'm going to. All I know is that I love physics. Before I didn't know what I wanted to do after high school, but after last year, when I took the AP Physics course offered at my school, I decided that I'd seek a Physics degree. But even then I wasn't sure what the heck I'd do with a degree in Physics. Apparently the answer is "not much". I still want to study Physics. But now I'm a little bit thrown off by everything I've read on this thread. Would it be a good idea to major in Engineering Physics, since it has "engineering" in it? Haha!

Damn life's coming at me fast but that just means I'll have to go faster! Hehe. I've always been a hardworking student but now I'm going to have to step it up a notch and become a bit of a multitasker and start looking for job opportunities as soon as I get into college.

Haha.....I'm thinking that everybody on this thread is going to be reading my post and thinking, "Oh to be young and optimistic." But I don't see much use in doing anything else. Gotta have something to keep me going right?

Anyways I'd welcome any college/job advice you'd like to give me, even if it's not exactly what I'd like to hear. And I also realize that the last post in was 4 months ago so......yeah.

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xnmmi in Lancaster, California

55 months ago

Pretty much regardless what degree you have, unless you have some "life experience" when you are as young as you are, you will not get very far. Sadly. Here's an example: My stepson has his 4 year degree in Criminal Science & Police Science; he has all of his POST training and all of his firearms certifications. He had all these by the time he was 24. He applied to LAPD and LASD, passed everything and was turned down because he has no "life experience" - i.e. military background. You should seriously think about going in the Navy nuke field. Lots of physics and engineering tasks there and you would be able to do your secondary schooling as well. You come out of the service with the required life experience and start on your career. Just a thought.

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Californian in Moraga, California

55 months ago

I'm not a physicist but doesn't that require at least a bit of math? I see stuff for analytical roles that seem to want a higher level of math than what you get going through business school. I would think there could be a fit in an analytical role someplace.

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Californian in Moraga, California

55 months ago

guest in San Mateo, California said: A PhD is required for a business data analysis job.

Not even remotely.

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shilohlitton in Salisbury, Maryland

55 months ago

Try looking into medical physics...

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Roberto in Eagle Pass, Texas

55 months ago

xnmmi,
Yeah I know what you mean about life experience because from several things I've read here and elsewhere employers want people who can "do" things not just...think about them...however, I think my parents would kill me if I ever even said the word "military", even if I wouldn't be fighting any wars or anything...regardless, life experience would be incredibly useful so I'll keep that in mind thanks :)

Shiloh,
Um...I'm always thrown off by something that has the word "medicine" in it...I don't know; medicine has never interested me at all. However, if it's an option, I'll have to look into it, thanks.

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Absurdity in Ocala, Florida

55 months ago

Roberto, glad to hear you've caught the physics bug. I similarly became interested when I was in my senior year of HS. The best ideas I can offer are these:

(Please forgive the length on multiple posts!)

1.Physics is a very broad domain touching a vast number of disciplines, so you have to eventually discover a few areas/fields/jobs that stand out above the rest in your mind. Do research (which physics guys should be good at) on what is out there and begin narrowing your interests into a field or even a company that you think you'd be interested in working for. Find and talk to professionals in that area of specialty or that work at that company. Find out what they do at their job and what they did to get there. Though your university and its professors next year may be a wealth of information and connections at first, look off-campus out in the real work world to find people who are working at a company you find interesting or doing something with a physics degree. Search on-line, find articles of journals, magazines, newspapers and off-campus as well for anything and everything that will open up your mind to more career ideas and, eventually, a more focused field. Anyway, you get the point lol.

So, yes, search the engineering/physics route because all my engineer friends have good jobs now, even those who graduated years after me! (But being an “engineer” wasn't for me, so I'm fine with that.) And yes, look into medical physics, if you can tolerate the biology--and other--courses you'll have to take. But keep in mind, what's currently happening right now will not necessarily be the case 5+ years from now.

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Absurdity in Ocala, Florida

55 months ago

For example, it used to be that you only had to have a masters in medical physics to be a "medical physicist" as long as you had received your degree from an accredited medical physics program. Now the field is near-saturated and they up'd the requirements so that you have to go through a residency and the whole 9 yards to become one (sorta like MD's). So now you're actually better off putting in the extra couple years to get a PhD in med physics; not to mention that most hospitals/radiation therapy facilities now would probably hire a medical physicist with a PhD over a masters-toting candidate.

2.Also, begin to discover your other interests so that you can diversify your skills and education when you get to college. If you have interest in finance, stock market, etc. then think about majoring in physics and minoring in finance - this is critical if you want to be a quant for mutual funds company or something. If you really like computers and programming, then consider minoring (or double-majoring if that's your thing) in computer science when you're in college. However, if all you want to do is teach and do research at the university level or at a national laboratory setting, then simply major in physics and get a masters and a PhD after that.

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Absurdity in Ocala, Florida

55 months ago

3. When you get to college, as much as you may want to kick back and enjoy all your summers off or working hard to make some good money, I strongly encourage you to take at least one and do a summer internship — in fact, two summers if you can afford to! Some as early as the summer between your sophomore and junior year, but “they” (the companies & your potential future employer) start taking you as a student more seriously the summer between your junior and senior year and the just after your senior year also. This can be extremely valuable if its with a company that you like and enjoy the work they do and they like you and want to hire you – you can then be making more money after 4 years of college than most of us in this forum are currently making with a masters degree :-)

I may only be speaking for myself, but I was unfortunately amongst the generation of people that was raised under the proverbial belief that if you just worked hard and got good grades and went to university and did the same and did your due diligence with networking and internships and then maybe went on to get a masters degree, that you wouldn't have too much trouble finding a great job (and decent-paying one for entry level) afterwards. And that all you had to do is get a higher education and degree and you'd automatically better your chances. This however is most definitely not true all the time. (For those who this has worked out for you, then awesome, I commend you, you are a rarity and are truly blessed!) Most of the time, it will boil down to who you know (or rather, who knows you and cares) and what you've done (that is, experience – not educational degrees).

I wish you the best Roberto, and I'm sure if you have other questions about this, any of us here who's been in this forum will be more than willing to offer what we can.

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Roberto in Eagle Pass, Texas

54 months ago

First of all I would like to thank you, Absurdity, for the wealth of information you've just given me haha. You've definitely given me hope and I honestly look forward to the future :)

That being said, I've done my research on, and actually am continuing to research, colleges which offer degrees in Physics and Engineering Physics. Right now it's too early to tell what exactly I would like to do, and I have a doubt about what a degree in Engineering Physics actually is. From what I've read at several college websites, it's a major in physics with a concentration on Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, etc. Is this correct? Or am I missing something?

Your help is greatly appreciated. :)

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Mark2m in Austin, Texas

54 months ago

You might of seen my post in other threads. My son graduated 4/12 BS Engineering physics. After 4 months of pointless company sites each requesting a different profile format, resume, and cover letter, the only jobs came from the oil and gas business. This was after 75 resume's to companies utilizing engineering physics. Luckily, he is now working as an oil and shale gas engineer for an oil services company, loves his job and never home.
Note he has had extensive international experience (applications vs theoretical) in fluids and water transmission. The oil companies are growing and hiring physics engineers especially due to the math portions of their education.

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Mark2m in Austin, Texas

54 months ago

If you plan on oil and gas and work in the field, dont bother with a PHd since you were will be overqualified. No one is looking at logging, fracking, tools, completions with an MS, a BS is more than adequate.

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jack in Denton, Texas

52 months ago

Mark2m in Austin, Texas said: If you plan on oil and gas and work in the field, dont bother with a PHd since you were will be overqualified. No one is looking at logging, fracking, tools, completions with an MS, a BS is more than adequate.

Could you give me some information about the company. I just got my MS in physics, and trying very hard to find a job. My email: jack.dialogue@gmail.com

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geography guy in Houston, Texas

52 months ago

I would recommend remote sensing. Remote sensing is normally part of the curriculum in geography departments (such as mine). But from what I've heard, remote sensing jobs also look for people with physics backgrounds.

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Mark2m in Indialantic, Florida

52 months ago

guest in San Francisco, California

I guess most of the classmates in my son's school that graduated in 4/11 with BS physics engineering, arent working for oil companies? the fact the oil and oil services companies that are on campus for the job fairs are looking for phd's? some of his friends are evidently working for monopoly money in Prudhoe bay at $100K plus room and board, imagine what they can make with a phd instead of a BS. Yes you are perfectly right, out in the field you need a phd to work and oversee the rigs, get real. Most of the graduates of CO.School of Mines are graduating with jobs at $60K + without MS or Phd. Dont believe me look it up yourself, go to job sites, instead of expousing your drivel on this forum.

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Mark2m in Indialantic, Florida

52 months ago

guest in San Francisco, California
`I am sorry it is BS Engineering Physics. I must have hit a nerve and I am sorry, if you know how to do a basic search on the web, you will find that this degree has many applications.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

52 months ago

That should read "M.S.M.E."

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Riot in Ware, Massachusetts

52 months ago

As this thread has moved past its original topic of what to do with a MS in Physics, I do want to add my two cents about a BS in Petroleum Engineering: It's not essential to work for an oil company. Not one bit. I have a friend who graduated with a BS in ChemE in 2010 and was offered a job for an oil company before the end of the summer. She turned it down and now works for a biotech company, but I can tell you that the salary she was offered then is higher even than what my other engineer friends make today, despite working for good companies and having more experience.

Working in technical fields seems to come down to relatively few things: Have a decent GPA. Do undergrad research, internships, or have previous relevant work experience. An M.S. can help you by being a GPA booster and offering 1-2 years of additional experience, so long as you choose a thesis topic relevant to the work you want to do.

Also, for those reading this thread looking for help finding work with a Physics MS, check out physicsforums.com . I read this site occasionally and people there (in the Career Forum) are smart and trying to do the same kinds of things you are. (Those who read this forum regularly know I'm not just shilling for a site.)

Good luck.

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-indeedhost in Austin, Texas

52 months ago

Hello Everyone, Please stay on topic and adhere to our forum guidelines. Be respectful, reasonable and relevant. Don't post anything nonsensical, disruptive or irrelevant. If you're not sure your comment is a meaningful contribution, don't post it. We remove inappropriate content including personal attacks and aggressive, threatening or profane language. You can find the rest of our guidelines here: http://www.indeed.com/forum/gen/How-to-Use-Indeed/Indeed-Forum-Rules/t82504 Thank you, Indeed Host

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SwimAway in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

52 months ago

"I'd appreciate any real advice. What tactic could I use to find something?"

Rob - I'm glad you found a job, albeit teaching which is not your first love.
Have you considered relocating? I've noticed Physics jobs on Monster in the past for pharmaceutical, chemical and other well-recognized companies in my general area, and I believe there are many more of these companies along the east coast. My friend works for NASA and loves it (as a Research Engineer, but the research aspect sounds physics-like?)...just a thought to open more possibilities if there is nothing keeping you in Columbus.

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Rob in Columbus, Ohio

52 months ago

It's been a while since I've been on here. I hope this thread has been useful for someone out there.
Yes, I've considered relocating. In fact, I would like to. I'm still in Ohio & am locked into a contract here until May, but after that I was hoping to move elsewhere & do something else.
I haven't used Monster in a couple years. I essentially gave up on Monster after submitting to hundreds (maybe thousands) of job postings on Monster (& CareerBuilder) & getting next to nothing in return. Unless Monster has changed drastically in terms of its effectiveness somehow, I don't think I'll go back to using it. There has got to be a better way. Thank you for your suggestion, though.
Incidentally, I did have an interview back in 2009 (my only one that whole year, as I recall) with a company who, if I were hired, was going to locate me in either Rochester, NY or Philadelphia. I didn't get the job, though. I visited Philadelphia this summer. Overall seems like a pretty nice city.

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SwimAway in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

52 months ago

Hi Rob, Philly has its ups & downs, like everywhere else I guess. :)
That's great! Being open to relocation will offer you many more additional opportunities.
Actually, I think your negativity toward Monster is really due to the behavior of the companies that you applied to, and how they dealt with the mass amounts of applicants (i.e. if they really took the time to review the MULTITUDE of resumes they received). Companies receive hundreds of resumes from postings on Career Builder, Indeed and others too. My theory is that when you started applying on Monster years ago, HR staff didn't know how to make the time, or have the tools, to properly analyze these mass amounts of applicants. Things may be different now with specialized automated software programs to search for keywords, degrees, etc. in resumes.
In my now 7 months (so far) of job hunting, (9) companies have contacted me for interviews: (4) of them were due to job postings on *Monster* that I applied to [(3) from Indeed, (1) from CareerBuilder, and (1) from a job fair]. Maybe its what you're applying for (I'm in sales & marketing). But I think if you keep an open mind to try various job sites again, you may be surprised at the opportunities available.
If I may suggest, to set up alerts in Indeed & Monster for major cities along the east coast (with a large search radius) to get an idea which companies are hiring for physics-related careers now; you can touch back with those specific companies in March/April to let them know you are available and interested. You never know! :)
Much luck to you!

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Rob in Columbus, Ohio

52 months ago

Thanks SwimAway. Maybe I will try some of those career websites again. It has been a couple years since I've used them, so they might be worth a try again.

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SwimAway in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

52 months ago

Good for you Rob! Chin Up! :^)

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tbone281 in Pleasanton, California

51 months ago

I also have an MS in physics. I basically used the experience from research to add skills to my resume. Programming in C, C++, hardware experience (i.e. semiconductors, data acquisition systems), and data analysis etc. My first job was with a semiconductor manufacturer in silicon valley....I was hired as a junior test engineer. From that job, I gained lots of experience writing software. Today, 15 years later, I am a principal software engineer with my hands in all kinds of things. I work with all windows operating systems, Android, linux. I also develop use C, C++, Java, Python and a host of other technologies and hardware.

There are a ton of recruiters looking for new college grads that would salivate over a person with the right technical background. Engineering positions are great for physics guys...it's just applied physics after all. Get a target job in mind..then examine your skillset...look for those things that you can improve upon. Offhand, I can think of a few jobs that have crossed my path. Test engineering for semiconductor companies, software engineering for many different industries (I have worked in semiconductor development, satellite communications, semiconductor reliability testing, software application development and colorimetry), and software development for financial services. An interesting point..the Quants on wall street hire Phd's in physics to develop algorithms for high speed trading. Too bad I only had a masters...they were being hired at 600k when I graduated.

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tbone281 in Pleasanton, California

51 months ago

guest in San Francisco, California said: An MS degree in physics is worthless for an engineering job. That's unfortunate but that is the job market of today. Recruiters are worthless. How about NAMING a company that WANTS someone with an MS in physics ???

An MS in physics will not even necessarily get you a second look. You need skills. Hardware skills (i.e. electronics...development and diagnostics, familiarity with measurement devices. Data acquistion from the hardware interfaces). Software skills (i.e. Data analysis software, user interface development, scripting, HTML reports, XML data transformations). A person with no skills aside from theory is pretty much someone who will not get a job, aside from teaching.

Look into big data...Hadoop. That is something that is coming into its own. If you ever had the opportunity to do data analysis on large data sets...this is something you should be able to sell yourself on. I am not going to name companies...you should be able to get jobs where the requirement is bachelors in mathematics, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, computer science. For the rare few physics guys with interest in biology...bioinformatics.

Just to let you know...I am not even scratching the surface here. Get skills. An MS in physics is impressive. Make it work for you.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

51 months ago

@tbone281,

You're dealing with a troll.

Best of luck with your efforts.

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Californian in San Leandro, California

51 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: @tbone281,

You're dealing with a troll.

Best of luck with your efforts.

Good to see that I'm not the only one who noticed that.

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tbone281 in Pleasanton, California

51 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: @tbone281,

You're dealing with a troll.

Best of luck with your efforts.

I thought that before I replied...but on the chance the guy had given up...I responded anyway. The only reason I am posting is because I've been where a lot of these guys have been. I had no clue what to do after graduation...the best thing to do is stay in contact with your friends from school. It's all about chance finding the right recruiter who will submit your resume to the hiring manager...if one of your buddies gets in, chances are that either his company or the recruiter who submitted the resume is savvy enough to realize that a physics degree is not a liability...but an asset. Use these job sites...linked in can be used to stay in contact with friends from school. Update your linked in profile frequently...that will get you more hits from recruiters. Make sure all your skills are represented on your profile. Anyway...if I had to do it all over again...the resources available today are much better than they were back in the day. Good luck!

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tbone281 in Pleasanton, California

51 months ago

Ok...when a recruiter does submit your resume to a hiring manager, make sure you know all you can about the company and the position you are a candidate for. Show up on time! Dress to impress...a lot of interviewers will see a shabby looking candidate as a disrespectful person. It doesn't matter that you will be interviewing for an engineering position...don't dress like a bum until after you've been hired and gotten past the trial period.

During the interview, make sure the interviewer has a copy of your resume. You can control the interview by what you have put on the resume. Try to keep the information on your resume focused on the position you are trying to get. Otherwise, you will find the interviewer asking questions on some oddball thing you may have touched on years ago...and then proceed to go into much more detail than you were prepared to handle. Know the skills on your resume....the more you know, the better your odds of getting the job.

If at some point you feel the interview is not going well...don't lose your cool. Take it for what it is...an opportunity to improve your interviewing skills. Remember, interviewing is also a learned skill that comes with sacrifice. Also, be prepared to ask lots of questions. Nobody is going to hire someone who can't grasp the concept enough to ask intelligent questions.

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mfour in Agawam, Massachusetts

51 months ago

Yet again yet another story of collages that teach with no regard of the needs of business and tuition structure out of balance with future earnings based on investment.

Collages teach subjects not careers. Only Medical schools and law schools (and maybe Harvard Business school) teach with career goals in mind. Most others teach subjects and many push subjects based on what will interest a 17-18 year old high school kid to go into debt over so there are tons of Art majors and future game developers and music majors and communication majors.

Yours is yet another story as your field is one bound to academia. Look at those in your field the most successful physicists are professors at a university who struggled with the politics of academia to get tenure always relying on a grant to further their studies and tuition from students like you for their income. I am not bad mouthing your profession but it is just my perspective that education is NOT as valued in today's society outside of the academic world. unless you specifically target a area of study based on a Career path out side of academia.

Like computer science major but even then competition from globalization is driving down wages even in fields that at one point guaranteed you a good paying position after obtaining your degree.
Many companies complain they can't find qualified US citizens so they can get government approval to get visas for foreign workers that will take the job at much lower wage.

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tbone281 in Pleasanton, California

51 months ago

mfour...a masters in physics isn't useless in industry. You are off base here. The tuition structure is another matter.

A physics master's student should be able to find an engineering position based on his skills. The physics degree brings a wide exposure to all of science...indeed all the core quantitative science disciplines arose out of efforts by physicists to understand nature. The basic skillset of a physics major is a grounding in advanced mathematics (all levels of calculus, differential equations, partial differential equations, linear algebra, lie algebras), logic, quantitative problem solving (theoretical and applied), as well as exposure to many disciplines (classical mechanics, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, electronics and circuit theory, electricity and magnetism, quantum field theory, quantum electrodynamics, quantum chromodynamics...etc. etc. etc.). During the research phase, the physics student has hands on hardware and software exposure (problem analysis, hardware/software solution design and development, experimental data gathering and analysis.).

In short, there should be no reason a physics master's student shouldn't get an engineering position.

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Mag in Punta Gorda, Florida

51 months ago

tbone, I agree with you whole heartedly...and thus there SHOULD be no reason a physics master's student shouldn't get an engineering position. Yet, I lost count of the number of engineering jobs I've applied for with no responses back on. To top it off, I've witnessed my friend finish his EE bachelor's and got an engineering job within a month (making a salary which I could have only hoped to start out at).

So in my personal experience I've concluded those companies really just want to hire those candidates with the word "Engineer" in their degree title

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Anonymous in Pincher Creek, Alberta

51 months ago

Have you guys ever considered that maybe the concept of jobs and money is the problem?

Then search "Paradise or Oblivion" on youtube and tell me what you think.

Essentially it is about a resource based economy, where "jobs" by our modern definition don't necessarily exist, and I think it would be a better place. Basically imagine if you could pursue any research you wanted, our production and manufacturing was all automated, we used renewable energy only, and everything was done to the extent to which we could sustainably support ourselves off of the resources in our environment.

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tbone281 in Pleasanton, California

51 months ago

Mag in Punta Gorda, Florida said: tbone, I agree with you whole heartedly...and thus there SHOULD be no reason a physics master's student shouldn't get an engineering position. Yet, I lost count of the number of engineering jobs I've applied for with no responses back on. To top it off, I've witnessed my friend finish his EE bachelor's and got an engineering job within a month (making a salary which I could have only hoped to start out at).

So in my personal experience I've concluded those companies really just want to hire those candidates with the word "Engineer" in their degree title

Mag...believe me, this isn't the case, in general. Recruiters, especially those that focus on new college graduates, are not beyond submitting a physics major for a junior level engineering position. They won't do it if specifically told by the hiring manager...but otherwise, you are fair game. In the real world, all new college grads will require some form of training for a new job...physics majors need to convince the recruiter, on their resume, that they have experience in the field and are highly motivated and trainable. Make sure to tailor the resume with your experiences that tie in with the job description. Also, if their are some items on the job description for which you have no experience, make sure you understand what they are by researching them...and if you have the opportunity, try to get some hands on experience with these things. The key here is to SELL yourself...you are a commodity to recruiters. They make money when you get hired...but look bad when it doesn't work out.

If I might ask...what type of position are you looking for?

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tbone281 in Pleasanton, California

51 months ago

The reason internships are a waste of time for an engineer...in most cases, the intern is not going to be hired for a full time engineering position at that firm. This means the candidate will have to be retrained at his new position. The only benefit is possible added experience that may fit a job description in the future...but, in the meantime, he could have been getting experience at a real job.

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Mag in Punta Gorda, Florida

51 months ago

tbone281 in Pleasanton, California said: Mag...believe me, this isn't the case, in general. Recruiters, especially those that focus on new college graduates, are not beyond submitting a physics major for a junior level engineering position. They won't do it if specifically told by the hiring manager...but otherwise, you are fair game. In the real world, all new college grads will require some form of training for a new job...physics majors need to convince the recruiter, on their resume, that they have experience in the field and are highly motivated and trainable. Make sure to tailor the resume with your experiences that tie in with the job description. Also, if their are some items on the job description for which you have no experience, make sure you understand what they are by researching them...and if you have the opportunity, try to get some hands on experience with these things. The key here is to SELL yourself...you are a commodity to recruiters. They make money when you get hired...but look bad when it doesn't work out.

If I might ask...what type of position are you looking for?

That's a great question that I'm still trying to figure out actually lol. I've been out of grad school for 4 years now and have simply picked up small-time jobs as they've been available to me while continuing to job hunt for something that's a better fit for me (if nothing else, pay wise). I've had such diverse interests and work experiences that I've never narrowed my direction to one specific field or job or company (The gift and curse of a jack-of-all trades). Lol, and I'm not sure if a recruiter could help me if I can't even give him a vague idea.

Although I have a physics bachelors and masters, I've definitely determined that being couped up in a lab room or cubicle with minimal people interaction is not for me. I'm outgoing and enjoy interacting with people, but I'm still very detail-oriented, analytical and enjoy problem solving.

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guest in San Francisco, California

51 months ago

Mag in Punta Gorda, Florida said: That's a great question that I'm still trying to figure out actually lol. I've been out of grad school for 4 years now and have simply picked up small-time jobs as they've been available to me while continuing to job hunt for something that's a better fit for me (if nothing else, pay wise). I've had such diverse interests and work experiences that I've never narrowed my direction to one specific field or job or company (The gift and curse of a jack-of-all trades). Lol, and I'm not sure if a recruiter could help me if I can't even give him a vague idea.

Although I have a physics bachelors and masters, I've definitely determined that being couped up in a lab room or cubicle with minimal people interaction is not for me. I'm outgoing and enjoy interacting with people, but I'm still very detail-oriented, analytical and enjoy problem solving.

Try looking at the professional physics societies such as American Institute of Physics and the American Physical Society.

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Average in Medford, Massachusetts

51 months ago

guest in San Francisco, California said: The internship definitely helps and in some fields almost an absolute necessity. Sorry but it does help to be a female as it allows employers to meet diversity requirements.

I'm not aware of any affirmative action/ diversity requirements in the United States that apply to private companies that don't have a direct contract with the government. On the other hand, there almost aren't any medium to large size corporations that don't have a contract with the government, so many large employers are required to reach out to "approved minorities".

Another motivation for reaching out to "approved minorities" is to improve public relations. In this day and age, very few medium to large sized corporations want to be seen as prejudiced towards future customers who, for the most part, will not be Caucasian men .

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