Metlife FSR

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Jared in Salt Lake City, Utah

68 months ago

Resilient in Edison, New Jersey said: I'm considering becoming a Financial Services Sales Rep for Metlife. I understand I'll be paid a "starter salary" for the initial 19 weeks, and thereafter I will be receiving 10% commission of what is in my sales pool.

How hard is it to succeed as a Metlife FSR if I am willing to work my fingers to the bone? I'm not scared of hard work, but I just want to make sure this pays off in the end. Can someone PLEASE help me??? I have a family and do not want to make the wrong decision.

Their expenses are very high after your five year mark.
$275.00 a week.

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Resilient in Edison, New Jersey

68 months ago

Jared in Salt Lake City, Utah said: Their expenses are very high after your five year mark.
$275.00 a week.

Thanks Jared! I'm going forward with the opportunity. By the time a would reach the five year mark, I just may trade up to working at a wire house such as Morgan Stanley.

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E in SoCal in Temecula, California

67 months ago

Resilient,

I am also considering a position at MetLife. I had a first interview, then took an assessment test (which I passed) and was called back for a 2nd interview next week.

How are you doing so far...and how is the training? Any info would be appreciated.

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Resilient in Edison, New Jersey

67 months ago

E in SoCal in Temecula, California said: Resilient,

I am also considering a position at MetLife. I had a first interview, then took an assessment test (which I passed) and was called back for a 2nd interview next week.

How are you doing so far...and how is the training? Any info would be appreciated.

At the current moment, I am studying for my Series 6 exam. I already obtained the Life, Accident & Health licenses. They have an in-house three day training session where you go over material in the Series 6. So far, so good. I really like what Metlife has showed me thus far, but the main concern I have is in obtaining the clientele. Not so easy, especially in this horrible economy. That's the only concern I have for now. Once you establish yourself, they have several different areas you can focus on: i.e. retirement planning, money managing, special needs disability planning for children, etc...

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Debating in Dayton, Ohio

67 months ago

Hello E and Resilient,

I too am considering a FSR job at MetLife since it has presented an opportunity to head home after graduation. I know from my conversations with the office director recruiting me, I was told that they don't hire until you have your Life and Health, Series 6, and Series 63 licenses. He said doing self-study and assuming I pass each on the first try, it should take me about 8 weeks to get through it all.

I was told that Series 65 and Series 7 can be undertaken once I get rolling... neither is a requirement for employment to begin. If you aren't familiar, Series 6 allows you to trade mutual funds, Series 65 allows you to deal with things like money managers, and Series 7 allows you to enter the whole scope of securities including individual equities, ETFs, etc...

I would love to keep information lines open on here if or when we all progress through the MetLife experience. I come from a background of working in a fee-only office, which is what I want to get back too, but geographically, I really didn't want to stay where I am. They've given me some good ideas though as I move forward.

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E in SoCal in Temecula, California

67 months ago

Debating in Dayton, Ohio said: Hello E and Resilient,

I too am considering a FSR job at MetLife since it has presented an opportunity to head home after graduation. I know from my conversations with the office director recruiting me, I was told that they don't hire until you have your Life and Health, Series 6, and Series 63 licenses. He said doing self-study and assuming I pass each on the first try, it should take me about 8 weeks to get through it all.

I was told that Series 65 and Series 7 can be undertaken once I get rolling... neither is a requirement for employment to begin. If you aren't familiar, Series 6 allows you to trade mutual funds, Series 65 allows you to deal with things like money managers, and Series 7 allows you to enter the whole scope of securities including individual equities, ETFs, etc...

I would love to keep information lines open on here if or when we all progress through the MetLife experience. I come from a background of working in a fee-only office, which is what I want to get back too, but geographically, I really didn't want to stay where I am. They've given me some good ideas though as I move forward.

Debating,

Yes, I would also like to keep open lines of communications regarding the hiring process at MetLife. I am getting pretty far along, but still do not have a firm offer. It seems that each agency of MetLife operates semi-independently, and so it would seem that the exact hiring process is determined by the Agency Sales Manager (?). Anyway, I had a few very in-depth and positive interviews with the Mgr, and he sent me the Project 200 to complete, and started the intense background check on me. The background check has taken over a week due to my having been married twice, and have a few combinations on my name for them to check through. He has kept me informed along the way, and it all seems positive, but sometimes a few days go by between hearing from them, and I start to wonder... I have been

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E in SoCal in Temecula, California

67 months ago

Have to continue...as I ran out of room.

Anyway, I have been studying for my 52 hour LH license course, and will go ahead and schedule the exam soon.

From everything I have learned about the company so far, I am very impressed with the FSR opportunity. They are very selective, and their retention is very high. The mgr told me that they only hire 6 people a year in this position at this agency. Many do not make it passed their very stringent hiring process. I think that they just really want to make sure there is a good fit, as they will be investing quite a lot in you in the first few years.

Lastly, I beleive that the insurance products that they offer are needed more than ever in these uncertain times.

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wifeandmomof2 in Keokuk, Iowa

66 months ago

Fire your boss in Lees Summit, Missouri said: Ladies and Gentlement, MetLife is a well known Company and I'm certain, for some, an opportunity that will pay the bills. Consider this, instead of being a large companies leverage, why not build your own? Instead of making someone else a lot of money, why not have others make you a lot of money? It's all possible for the people who want more than to just trade hours for dollars. If you doubled what you have now, would it be enough to live the way we all want to live? What do you have to lose? Ask for more info.

Ok, you got me, what are you talking about????

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Sam in Glendora, California

66 months ago

Are there particular requirements/skills/qualifications that a candidate should possess in order to be considered/qualified for MetLife?

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Cliff in Hammond, Louisiana

66 months ago

Make sure you don't have a criminal record Sam and the rest you'll learn when you go interview

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Sam in Glendora, California

65 months ago

Thanks Cliff, I browsed MetLife's website but there is no current posting for training program in LA, Orange, and San Diego counties.

As for any negative records, so far I am fine.

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Big G

65 months ago

I worked for Met for a short time a number of years ago. It seems to me that your best bet it to try and make connections with lawyers in your town that deal with estate issues. Many people use life insurance policies to transfer money without it becoming a taxable event. CPA's are also a valuable source. All I know is I went to MONY to interview there after leaving Met and they said I could work there, but would not be eligible for base pay since I had already worked under that type of arrangement. I guess if I had it all to do over again I would have rather of worked for a local broker agency with strong community ties...giving you the flexibility
to sell multiple company products, not worrying about "quota"

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T in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

64 months ago

Hi all, I am far along in the interview process and am waiting for my clearances to take the series licensing. I was wondering if anyone could tell me how difficult it will be to find leads and Metlife just expects you to hound your friends and family for business. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks.

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Resilient in Edison, New Jersey

64 months ago

"T" in PA: I just went through the entire process, pre-selection testing, interviewing, licensing, and voluntary resignation. I resigned this month. Once fully licensed (life, health/disability, Series 6), you have to meet a pre-appointment production. I had to sell $20k worth of commissionable product in order to be appointed. Then you are paid somewhere between $900-$1300 p/wk for 19 weeks. I didn't even meet the pre-appointment production because yes, YOU DO have to contact your family, friends, and anyone with a pulse to sell to. I ran into a brick wall because the people I know did not want to purchase anything relating to financial services since they are quite scared considering the market today. They DO NOT give you any leads until you are appointed. Even then, (and I know firsthand), the leads are basically term conversions so it's not exactly like they are hot. The leads, if they want to so call them that, are garbage. Me personally, I think this is somewhat of a scam because they know if you don't make it, you may have already put business on the books which they keep. At this point, I am considering opening up my own business. I figure if I am going to bust my buns, it will directly benefit me and my family. I won't have to give anyone a "cut" of my action. Seems like they are "pimping" people out there, to be blunt. The good news is that I come out of this unscathed. I only paid $80 or so for my Series 6 licensing and $200 or so for Life/Health licensing. So I now have a Series 6 and L&H license and can now go anywhere with this.

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E in SoCal in Temecula, California

64 months ago

Resilient,

Sorry to hear it didn't work out with, but it sounds like you have a positive attitude for the next step in your career. I ended up going the 7/66 route, as I had already started that process when considering EJones. I already have Life and health, and passed the Series 7, now I take the 66 next Monday. I have been attending training at the MetLife office, and yes, some in the class are bringing in policies (those who sold life insurance before). I do not feel comfortable selling policies to my fam and friends until I know what products are best for them...I have been focusing so much on passing these tests! Soooo, I thought I would be locking in my pre-appointment production number once I finished my 66. Do I have some time? or is it immediate? I am still a little unclear on this, and yes, I agree with you, that this is an uncomfortable situation to go through just to start getting paid! I want to make this long term, and I do not want to make my newbie mistakes with my valuable personal contacts! They said I could bring another agent with me to appointments, but I would rather do that with strangers, or new leads, rather than my personal contacts. Help!! I love the idea of this company, and all the benefits they offer, and just wish there was a better way to get through the early stages.

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tsuke23 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

64 months ago

Resilient in NJ:
Thanks alot for the heads up. From what they told me, the compensation sounded good and I would be willing to do the job, but not if it requires me hounding people I personally know only to sell them something that they are not interested in. I knew it sounded too good to be true that they were willing to pay me that, considering I took no finance courses in college, have a degree in Management and only have sales and marketing experience. thanks again!

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hello in Sacramento, California

64 months ago

Resilient in Edison, New Jersey said: "T" in PA: I just went through the entire process, pre-selection testing, interviewing, licensing, and voluntary resignation. I resigned this month. Once fully licensed (life, health/disability, Series 6), you have to meet a pre-appointment production. I had to sell $20k worth of commissionable product in order to be appointed. Then you are paid somewhere between $900-$1300 p/wk for 19 weeks. I didn't even meet the pre-appointment production because yes, YOU DO have to contact your family, friends, and anyone with a pulse to sell to. I ran into a brick wall because the people I know did not want to purchase anything relating to financial services since they are quite scared considering the market today. They DO NOT give you any leads until you are appointed. Even then, (and I know firsthand), the leads are basically term conversions so it's not exactly like they are hot. The leads, if they want to so call them that, are garbage. Me personally, I think this is somewhat of a scam because they know if you don't make it, you may have already put business on the books which they keep. At this point, I am considering opening up my own business. I figure if I am going to bust my buns, it will directly benefit me and my family. I won't have to give anyone a "cut" of my action. Seems like they are "pimping" people out there, to be blunt. The good news is that I come out of this unscathed. I only paid $80 or so for my Series 6 licensing and $200 or so for Life/Health licensing. So I now have a Series 6 and L&H license and can now go anywhere with this.

Resilient, I have also been talking to a Sales Director from Metlife. They are not as clear as I want them to be. Are you saying that I would have to have the $20k of products sold 541before they pay the $900-$1300/wk?

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steven dominic in Fayetteville, New York

63 months ago

hi i was wondering if metLifes process includes drug testing?

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Opinionated1 in Saint Louis, Missouri

60 months ago

There is an EXTREME learning curve. On average, cases take 4-12 weeks to "place" which means while you are going to 15 appointments per week, you won't have gas money or spare change to eat. If you make $3,000 "GDC" then you will get 63% of that $3,000, which equals $1890, over ten weeks equals $189 per week. It's above average commission for the industry, but it takes FOREVER to get paperwork through compliance, and most cases are NOT $3,000, they are less than half that!

You won't need to work fingers to the bone, but success relies wholly on "cherry-picked" leads that go directly to the leaders in the firm. You will be given a salary for the first 19 weeks, then they open the door and push you out on your own. You go from about $800/week to less than $400/week, and then even less. The way the leaders make it so far is "selling" their leads to the newbies. They will keep 40% off the top, and send you out to make them money while they sit in their offices & get fat. 63% of 60% is next to nothing.

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Jason in Travelers Rest, South Carolina

58 months ago

Cliff in Hammond, Louisiana said: Make sure you don't have a criminal record Sam and the rest you'll learn when you go interview

How strict are they regarding the background check? I've interviewed twice, passed the assessment, finished the project 100, and I'm supposed to meet one more time to get fingerprinted & discuss when I'm taking the tests. I have a dui (4 yrs ago) & a couple minor in possession of alcohol violations (8 or so yrs ago) on my record. Do you think they will cut me b/c of these?

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Done in San Diego, California

57 months ago

Resiliant's comments are well taken. There are guys in the office who put in months of 10 hour days and still never 'flipped' to the Financing Plan, which is the 19 weeks of actual pay being referred to. Then the policies they did sell remain right with the GA.

And you may have to pay for every phone call, fax, marketing piece, postage and copy from your own pocket.

But least you've got your FINRA licenses to show for it..

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FloridaMom1026 in Orlando, Florida

57 months ago

Sounds like MetLife is a pyramid scheme of sorts..

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n/a in seattle in Long Island City, New York

57 months ago

i've been on board for almost a month now. went through the stressful 7 and 66 tests. everday there seems to be one thing after the other that makes me question staying. the biggest difficulty is finding clients. I dont feel that comfortable hounding my family and friends. I have called all my friends and have gotten some to meet with me but they are to young and don’t have enough $$ to really consider financial planning. I feel like some of the friends have been really turned off by me calling them about business. I feel like I have been left alone currently with no help finding clients or "leads", which makes getting paid after i'm off the base salary close to impossible. it's not that this job is tough, its just that it's hard to find people to work with.

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George in Benson, Arizona

57 months ago

If your breath can fog a mirror met will hire u.

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F in Brooklyn, New York

57 months ago

Resilient in Edison, New Jersey said: "T" in PA: I just went through the entire process, pre-selection testing, interviewing, licensing, and voluntary resignation. I resigned this month. Once fully licensed (life, health/disability, Series 6), you have to meet a pre-appointment production. I had to sell $20k worth of commissionable product in order to be appointed. Then you are paid somewhere between $900-$1300 p/wk for 19 weeks. I didn't even meet the pre-appointment production because yes, YOU DO have to contact your family, friends, and anyone with a pulse to sell to. I ran into a brick wall because the people I know did not want to purchase anything relating to financial services since they are quite scared considering the market today. They DO NOT give you any leads until you are appointed. Even then, (and I know firsthand), the leads are basically term conversions so it's not exactly like they are hot. The leads, if they want to so call them that, are garbage. Me personally, I think this is somewhat of a scam because they know if you don't make it, you may have already put business on the books which they keep. At this point, I am considering opening up my own business. I figure if I am going to bust my buns, it will directly benefit me and my family. I won't have to give anyone a "cut" of my action. Seems like they are "pimping" people out there, to be blunt. The good news is that I come out of this unscathed. I only paid $80 or so for my Series 6 licensing and $200 or so for Life/Health licensing. So I now have a Series 6 and L&H license and can now go anywhere with this.

----------

What can you do with these licenses?

What is the annual earning for a first year?

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Resilient in Edison, New Jersey

57 months ago

"F" in Brooklyn: While with the firm, these licenses entitle you to sell life, health, and disability products in the state licensed. Your Series 6 allows you to sell the same version of products but variable (i.e. variable annuity, variable life, etc) in addition to mutual funds. Should you decide to leave the firm, you can take your licenses with you. There is a myriad of things you can use them for. Earnings for the year SOLELY depend on your output/production. You need to fill your "sales funnel" and then you will receive your weekly drips in the amount of your commission payout. It didn't work out for me, but, it may for you. As for me, I am sticking with my day job and working on eventually OWNING my own business. This, in my opinion, is what America is all about - freedom, the pursuit of happiness, chasing the dream, whatever you may call it. I'm 31 years old and have worked in Corporate America for quite some time, and, I decided that I am better suited to being the employer, and, not the employee. -Godspeed-

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F in Brooklyn, New York

57 months ago

Resilient in Edison, New Jersey said: "F" in Brooklyn: While with the firm, these licenses entitle you to sell life, health, and disability products in the state licensed. Your Series 6 allows you to sell the same version of products but variable (i.e. variable annuity, variable life, etc) in addition to mutual funds. Should you decide to leave the firm, you can take your licenses with you. There is a myriad of things you can use them for. Earnings for the year SOLELY depend on your output/production. You need to fill your "sales funnel" and then you will receive your weekly drips in the amount of your commission payout. It didn't work out for me, but, it may for you. As for me, I am sticking with my day job and working on eventually OWNING my own business. This, in my opinion, is what America is all about - freedom, the pursuit of happiness, chasing the dream, whatever you may call it. I'm 31 years old and have worked in Corporate America for quite some time, and, I decided that I am better suited to being the employer, and, not the employee. -Godspeed-

--------

thanks alot..

I just got started with MetLife and will take licenses exams. If I leave there later, can I open my insurance firm or small business with these licenses?

Also, real estate agent / insurance agent , which is better?

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Resilient in Edison, New Jersey

57 months ago

"F" in Brooklyn: You can definitely open up your own insurance agency with those licenses. Of course and needless to say, there are a few other administrative things to acquire if you go this route (financing for your business, commercial business insurance,the right legal formation of your business etc...). You can succeed in both real estate and insurance, but, if it were me, I would pick insurance. It's a commodity that everyone needs, and, will never go away unless our entire world as we know it turns into a total socialistic or communistic society (i.e. North Korea, Cuba). Insurance is what keeps a widow in her home after her husband's death, it is helping rebuild our new proud symbol, the new World Trade Center in NYC, and also gets you out of a fender bender or two. I know I'm long winded, but, I enjoy helping people so hope this aids you well.

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nycfeng in Brooklyn, New York

57 months ago

Resilient in Edison, New Jersey said: "F" in Brooklyn: You can definitely open up your own insurance agency with those licenses. Of course and needless to say, there are a few other administrative things to acquire if you go this route (financing for your business, commercial business insurance,the right legal formation of your business etc...). You can succeed in both real estate and insurance, but, if it were me, I would pick insurance. It's a commodity that everyone needs, and, will never go away unless our entire world as we know it turns into a total socialistic or communistic society (i.e. North Korea, Cuba). Insurance is what keeps a widow in her home after her husband's death, it is helping rebuild our new proud symbol, the new World Trade Center in NYC, and also gets you out of a fender bender or two. I know I'm long winded, but, I enjoy helping people so hope this aids you well.

--------------

Thanks again.

What are the steps to set up own insurance agency, selling other big insurance company's products?

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Resilient in Edison, New Jersey

57 months ago

"nycfeng" - I wish I could help with the steps in selling for the big carriers, but, not sure of which direction to take. What you may want to do is go to the carrier's site directly, and sometimes there is a "become an agent" field for your to fill out. I know some very, very big carriers require you to have a big book of business first before they will even talk to you. So what you really need to do is contact as many large and/or small carriers and see who you can get an appointment with first. Just make sure whatever you do, you stay close and follow state insurance law.

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anonymous in Warren, New Jersey

57 months ago

starting to wonder how you made GDC in this biz. Sucks because my managers are all great guys but everyone I'm calling doesn’t want to meet with me.

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yaaja in Newark, Delaware

57 months ago

I was offered an administrative position working in a Metlife office in another state. They say I have to be fingerprinted and go through a background check. I have no criminal history but due to the economy I have a few "hiccups" on my credit report. Do they check credit reports for admin positions??

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... in Long Island City, New York

57 months ago

working as an FSR at Met you have to find your own clients (like calling everyone you've ever met), been told to reverse address search for phone numbers and cold call basically out of the phone book. Not sure if this is just typical for an FSR job but I had hoped that working as an FSR/financial planner i could spend my time showcasing my knowledge of finances and not spend my days cold calling. instead i am being told to say anything when i'm calling people so i can get them into the office, im an honest person and dont like the idea of being a greasy salesperson. i didnt need to go to college for this shiz. i should have instead spent my last four years cold calling.

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Anonymous in Niagara Falls, New York

50 months ago

A few questions on MetLife..

1.Anyone know the average time it takes to fulfill the pre-production requirement at MetLife? (Before the financing plan kicks in)

2. Is there a deadline set to accomplish this?

3.Am I interpreting this correctly in that pre-production business is must mostly come from friends & family?

4.Not sure I understand how you can sell if you are not actually appointed with them??

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mj in Floral Park, New York

48 months ago

steven dominic in Fayetteville, New York said: hi i was wondering if metLifes process includes drug testing?
ever find out if there was? just got an unpaid internship at metlife

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CurrentFSR in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania

48 months ago

mj in Floral Park, New York said:

There is no mandatory drug test.

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always be selling in Orlando, Florida

47 months ago

Resilient in Edison, New Jersey said: I'm considering becoming a Financial Services Sales Rep for Metlife. I understand I'll be paid a "starter salary" for the initial 19 weeks, and thereafter I will be receiving 10% commission of what is in my sales pool.

How hard is it to succeed as a Metlife FSR if I am willing to work my fingers to the bone? I'm not scared of hard work, but I just want to make sure this pays off in the end. Can someone PLEASE help me??? I have a family and do not want to make the wrong decision.

Been at Met for 3 yrs now. Looking for other job.

Here is the skinny on them:
You must pass Life, health and annuity state test for license.
Pass Series 6 test for license.
19 weeks salary based on prior job's income.
Leads are from base customer's, they have been called constantly. You call, then the lead is given to the other new person to call, and the other person who has been there three weeks-they call. All the while you're still calling this person. And if the customer 'happens' to pick up they'll demand what the problem is with their policy? Because everyone in the office is calling! Or if they've been on the books for awhile, they'll know what the dealio is and never call you back.

You can ask for a 'cold call' list. Rejection. Be prepared for rejection. Call, call, call. You will be working your finger's to the bone.

If you're lucky, you'll get a customer and sell one. This may be one given to you by the office manager, to get your confidence up to sell more.

You will sell friends and family life insurance, investments, etc.

You will call, call and call for the next 3 yrs. And you will be expected to drive to every customer's home that you can't get into the office. Some feel they have to drive to the customer's home or you won't sell anything. Some feel it's better to meet people at their homes, because they have all of their bank statements there. Better to sell to.
Good luck.

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always be selling in Orlando, Florida

47 months ago

Commission pay after 19 weeks. Commission only is like gambling.
You're gambling that the customer will say yes. Your gambling that they're as healthy as a horse, like they say they are so the life policy goes through. Gambling on the paycheck going up instead of down.

If you are a salesman, this is for you! If you can handle rejection from every angle; customer's, boss, underwriting, coworker's. This is for you.

There is no respect, even if you've been there for 20 yrs, sad to say.

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Jimbo in New York, New York

47 months ago

Current FSR in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania said: a4.Already answered.

Current FSR- After 5 mos are you happy with the jod so far? Are you struggling or doing well or somewhere in between? What % of your contacts become sales? I have a ton of potential contacts from prior career (easily 200), just wanted to know how many usually become sales.

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always be selling in Orlando, Florida

47 months ago

Does anyone know what happens to your GDC pool after leaving MetLife? You earned commission should be paid? Or do they keep it? I saw somewhere that any FINRA GDC is not paid after voluntary termination.

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The insurance lady in Naples, Florida

47 months ago

always be selling in Orlando, Florida said: Does anyone know what happens to your GDC pool after leaving MetLife? You earned commission should be paid? Or do they keep it? I saw somewhere that any FINRA GDC is not paid after voluntary termination.

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Judy P. in New York, New York

45 months ago

Metlife is a great place to work. I have 20 clients with over 14 million under management. I've sold stocks, bonds, etf's, variable annuities, a ton of life insurance and disability coverage. I've made over $100,000 in my first 14 months...and over $200,000 in the next 12. Its easy.

I used to work at Morgan Stanley. More freedom here. Better insurance products.

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Rob4life in Murrieta, California

43 months ago

Just started talking with Met. I am tired of being solo. Thanks Judy P.-Congrats to your success. Very few people buy insurance and investments without being 'sold' them. In addition to the comm, there are other benefits compared to independent. Because I wasn't focused on life and annuity I may qualify as a rookie with financing. Advantages to career agency: No major overhead while you initially build your clientele, also FICA and Taxes, Retirement, Office, Benefits, etc. I am older and have been a business owner. Hopefully it will give me an edge. I had 6/63 before. Should I get 7/65 from the start? How much harder is it to pass?

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Jake Tran in San Francisco, California

43 months ago

I read through most of this topic and I noticed that the core of this job is building clients, and you do so by hounding your family and friends. Can someone confirm if this is true or not? First of all, I have NO family because I have done something that brought my family shame, and they disowned me. Also, all my friends are in their early 20s and are dirt poor/cheap, and I am nearly 100% sure that they are NOT interested in buying metlife products. Should I still try to get a job as a FSR? I know this is commission based and everything and I would rather have a steady job that will actually bring food to the table!

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Wife in Madison, Wisconsin

42 months ago

Came across this by accident or not !! My husband worked for Met LifeP&C for 18 years. October 2009 I became sick I was fighting for my life.I was in the hospital for 12 weeks ,his manager gave him no support ,and could not take family leave because they do not pay you so I was more important than trying to do business and it cost him his job . The little guy making money for the big company ,be cautious about working for met life because their slogan for the (IF IN LIFE) does not apply to their employees.

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Resilient (Moved) in Wilmington, Delaware

40 months ago

Hi All,

It's been several months since I last commented on the forum. I'm no longer in NJ and have relocated. The years I spent working in insurance and financial services gave me a good idea. I created a website for insurance agents, financial advisors, realtors, and mortgage loan officers to list their business on. So, if anyone wants to list their business, just go to www.brokergopher.com/advertise.php. You can list your business for free, or really stand out with a photo gallery and you can even add video and be contacted through a contact form. Tell your buddies in the business too!

I know this does not apply to this forum topic, but hey - I was the one that originally started the topic lol!!!

I wish ALL of you Happy and Joyous Holidays with your family and loved ones.

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FrankBake in Provo, Utah

40 months ago

FloridaMom1026 in Orlando, Florida said: Sounds like MetLife is a pyramid scheme of sorts..

Being an insurance agent is definitely something that you build up over time, and some people might harass their friends/family/neighbors a bit with it, but it is definitely a respectable career that you can do very well in.

For more info on what it is like to be an agent, check out www.cpmipro.com/insurance-agent-work.htm.

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Frank in Tucson, Arizona

40 months ago

Wow I cannot believe it's already been over 2 years since you began this post! This post was the single reason why I took the job with Met and can say, 2 years in, I believe it was a good move. Was A LOT more work then I expected but think that was the blessing in disguise. If someone can survive working as an FSR with Met then they will KILL it at any other salaried + commission sales firm structure. The skills I learned in how to manage my time effectively and focus on high value tasks have been huge. Not sure if Met will be my last stop (most likely not), but I can say it definally propelled me into another league of sales ability.

With that said, I thank you for starting this forum discussion and Happy Holidays to you and your family as well!

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jacob h in Perris, California

38 months ago

hey just out of curiosity do you have to give metlife the money for your licenses or do you just go out and get to choose where to go study and all

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Gump in Walled Lake, Michigan

38 months ago

n/a in seattle in Long Island City, New York said: i've been on board for almost a month now. went through the stressful 7 and 66 tests. everday there seems to be one thing after the other that makes me question staying. the biggest difficulty is finding clients. I dont feel that comfortable hounding my family and friends. I have called all my friends and have gotten some to meet with me but they are to young and don’t have enough $$ to really consider financial planning. I feel like some of the friends have been really turned off by me calling them about business. I feel like I have been left alone currently with no help finding clients or "leads", which makes getting paid after i'm off the base salary close to impossible. it's not that this job is tough, its just that it's hard to find people to work with.

I feel the exact same way. I am with New England Financial and it is my 6th week with the firm. I am very hesitant to contact my natural market about planning and am looking for a change. I am leaving NEF to focus on the CFP exam this July and figure out my market niche. These first few weeks have been difficult, and the guidance is on and off. My manager is generally out on his own appointments and I am left calling on people that don't have funds or don't trust a 22 year old with their finances. With the CFP designation I will gain credibility and have a marketing plan that fits me when I join another firm.

Does anyone know what happens to your licenses, series 7, 66, L/H when you leave the firm?

Thanks for you help!

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