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Bluetea in Texas

27 months ago

jenab in Austin, Texas said: I have just under 300 on my list, and with the exception of maybe a dozen recruiters, and a handful of college students I worked with on a special project about 5 years ago, I do know all of them personally. And those students were impressive enough on the few times I met them that I was comfortable in connecting with them on LinkedIn.

Impressive. Er, so why isn't your phone ringing off the wall?

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jenab in Austin, Texas

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: You're right, I've had a lot of luck with recruiters (they all put me through to their client and have nothing but positive things to say) its when I get in front of the hiring manager that it feels impossible. I don't know why or what they want. I don't think they even know themselves.

That's often a huge barrier; some hiring managers know, and have worked with a (good) human resources professional who has trained them on identifying what they need,and how to look for it in a potential new hire.

I use LinkedIn and company websites and financial news/data to research companies that I'm either targeting or have made it to a phone screen or interview. Not everyone I talk to let's me demonstrate that I made that effort' some recruiters/recruiting assistants feel the need to tell candidates instead. That little time saver is a time sink if they have a lot of candidates because making the little bit of effort to know about the company demonstrate there's genuine interest and that you're not just a seat-filler.

If you have a job description, that is your key to what they're looking for, especially if it includes a skills or requirements section.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

27 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: Impressive. Er, so why isn't your phone ringing off the wall?

Bluetea, are you deliberately not reading the posts in here or what?

It's been stated numerous times that its a networking tool. Not necessarily something that will get you a job right off the bat. There are uses for it beyond having your phone ring.

You obviously are very stuck in your way of thinking.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

27 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: Impressive. Er, so why isn't your phone ringing off the wall?

The phone IS ringing.

I'm interviewing (last interview was yesterday, had two phone interviews and two phone screens last week). A recruiter called me yesterday as well about a position after seeing my LinkedIn profile.

Unfortunately most of the cold-call positions are at employers in a suburb that is not mass-transit accessible (and a few in town on the other side of town that might as well be in that suburb). And they're positions that require being on-site (versus remote).

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

27 months ago

jenab in Austin, Texas said:
If you have a job description, that is your key to what they're looking for, especially if it includes a skills or requirements section.

A lot of recruiters in my industry are young, new grads themselves who have little to no idea of what the job requires...they have list that they mark off.

I will apply only to jobs that I feel I match the desired skills/requirements and experience and I get the feeling that it just DOESN'T matter. They're looking for this magical 'fit' and 'personality' more than how well you'd do at the job. In fact I've done the job before with the same title at the same type of company but it doesn't matter. There is always someone either more qualified, better connected and or has the right look.

The roles I'm applying to are fairly generic and many many people could do them, hence the long process.

Connections, having the right personality & the right look are key here. I'd be a fool to think otherwise.

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DesertSunrise in Ypsilanti, Michigan

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: Bluetea, are you deliberately not reading the posts in here or what?

It's been stated numerous times that its a networking tool. Not necessarily something that will get you a job right off the bat. There are uses for it beyond having your phone ring.

You obviously are very stuck in your way of thinking.

Cheshire, you make a good point about Linkedin having other uses than being a job searching tool. However, speaking for myself, I don't use it for several reasons. One, I have been on there for a year and have found no luck in the job search. I have tried connecting with people in my industry, but these people either ignore me or are never logged in. Two, although I am only in my early twenties, I don't like the idea of having all of my personal information up for strangers to read. You can't just be a blank profile on Linkedin. You're trying to promote yourself. And the only way to promote yourself is to share information. Well, after a year of trying, the only interest I've gotten on that site is from recruiters and insurance companies wanting me to sell door-to-door insurance. They knew way too much information about me, so I ended up closing my profile.
Bluetea is unemployed. Bluetea's main focus right now is to find a job to pay bills and whatever else he/she needs. I know I'm not interested in networking unless it means a potential job. This is just the situation people are in. We NEED jobs to survive. We can network all we want when we have a job paying our bills. I'd rather apply to open positions than waste hours of my day trying to network with people who have no intentions of offering me a job at all.
You and Bluetea obviously have different ways of thinking. Both of you have made good points. However, what works for one person doesn't always work for another.

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Bluetea in Texas

27 months ago

DesertSunrise in Ypsilanti, Michigan said: Cheshire, you make a good point about Linkedin having other uses than being a job searching tool. However, speaking for myself, I don't use it for several reasons. One, I have been on there for a year and have found no luck in the job search. I have tried connecting with people in my industry, but these people either ignore me or are never logged in. Two, although I am only in my early twenties, I don't like the idea of having all of my personal information up for strangers to read. You can't just be a blank profile on Linkedin. You're trying to promote yourself. And the only way to promote yourself is to share information. Well, after a year of trying, the only interest I've gotten on that site is from recruiters and insurance companies wanting me to sell door-to-door insurance. They knew way too much information about me, so I ended up closing my profile.
Bluetea is unemployed. Bluetea's main focus right now is to find a job to pay bills and whatever else he/she needs. I know I'm not interested in networking unless it means a potential job. This is just the situation people are in. We NEED jobs to survive. We can network all we want when we have a job paying our bills. I'd rather apply to open positions than waste hours of my day trying to network with people who have no intentions of offering me a job at all.
You and Bluetea obviously have different ways of thinking. Both of you have made good points. However, what works for one person doesn't always work for another.

Well said. I agree with you 100% and thank you.

Its just not for everyone.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

27 months ago

Fair enough, although I stand by my point. If doing the same thing over and over isn't working then trying something new can't hurt. Its not like you're putting hours and hours of time into it. You can still apply to jobs the same way and try other things.

Anyways, I have nothing new to say on the topic.

Letting people know your job history isn't that huge a breach in privacy in my opinion. Than again what do I know, I'm relatively new to all of this so still slightly optimistic.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

27 months ago

Sometimes theres no debating with people who have already staunchly made up their minds and refuse to acknowledge any other points made.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

27 months ago

Also networking is way overrated. I tried networking many times. It never worked. Except for two brief part-time jobs when I was much younger, every job I've ever had, and I've had a few, I got by walking through the front door, literally and figuratively, and applying for it. That included answering ads.

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Bluetea in Texas

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: Sometimes theres no debating with people who have already staunchly made up their minds and refuse to acknowledge any other points made.

One last question and then we will agree to disagree.

How much time, would you say, do you spend on LinkedIn versus Indeed?

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

27 months ago

I agree with that conclusion too, I've 'networked' and gotten my resume passed along that way and it didn't make an ounce of difference.

Walking through doors and only applying on the spot is no longer a realistic option.

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Bluetea in Texas

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: Walking through doors and only applying on the spot is no longer a realistic option.

That was my era or your parent's. I never used a resume until I was 30.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: A lot of recruiters in my industry are young, new grads themselves who have little to no idea of what the job requires...they have list that they mark off.

That and even just five years ago the recruiters weren't having to compete with offshore companies and remote based recruiters. When all they get is a req and don't have the opportunity not luxury of developing relationships with the hiring managers, the quality of their searches suffer.

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said:
The roles I'm applying to are fairly generic and many many people could do them, hence the long process.

And if you've ever had to apply online, you could be the absolute perfect fit but if you don't match that Talent Acquisition software's algorithms, you're out of luck.

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: Connections, having the right personality & the right look are key here. I'd be a fool to think otherwise.

The more you can make personal connections and avoid "the system" the better.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: Walking through doors and only applying on the spot is no longer a realistic option.
Disagree. Nothing is stopping one from mailing letters of interest and resumes directly to companies. Yes, it requires work to ferret out the people who entertain resumes and drafting letters of interest to them (much more simplified than even a few years ago because of computers), but whoever said finding a job does not require work. And, yes, rate of return is low, but all it takes is one.

Ultimately, getting any job boils down to being in the right place at the right time.

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Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: A lot of recruiters in my industry are young, new grads themselves who have little to no idea of what the job requires...they have list that they mark off.

They remind me of the pretty young female pharma reps. It's like they first try to become pharma salespersons but didn't get the job so they became recruiters.

Most of them lie, not that bright, don't feel comfortable in the job of recruiter, and are name Ashley, Ericka, Caitlan, etc.

And I don't think I'm generalizing.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

27 months ago

Yes I understand that but guess what? That era is over. Times have changed and will continue to change, a lot of it is keeping up with the change and being flexible and open minded. Its a whole new world for us young folk too.

Contrary to what you might believe about how much time I spend on LinkedIn, its actually not that much at all. I'll check in a few times a day, if theres any updates to be made to my profile I'll do it. I have emails that'll show up in my inbox telling me about new connections or updates in my network, I take an interest in seeing what my colleagues are up too. I see any new job postings in my feed and then do proceeding research on the company and any connections I might have there.

I don't spend hours a day applying to jobs either, I research companies, have a spreadsheet going tracking the companies in my industry and look in to see if they have any new posting available once a week or so. I also follow these companies on Facebook and will get any news of jobs right away. I try and have a strategy with my job hunting. I don't believe I'm too good to do basic jobs (like many older folks believe about my generation), I do those on the side while looking for something permanent.

I understand that the primary focus is getting a job - any job. Unfortunately as we all realize here, it is anything but simple. That means more time, more effort and different approaches all requiring more energy. Nobody will be handing you a job just b/c you 'need' one. That's not how it works and never has.

I think it's truly insanity...doing the same things over and over b/c thats 'how it was done.' Educate yourself to how things have changed and be prepared for more changes ahead. Decreases in job security, contract work and low pay are the name of the game now.

Social media is here to stay, its not going anywhere. I choose to see where the possibilites are not the immediate downsides.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

27 months ago

DesertSunrise in Ypsilanti, Michigan said: I don't like the idea of having all of my personal information up for strangers to read. You can't just be a blank profile on Linkedin.

But you can lock down your profile and everything else and limit who can see it, including allowing no one to view your profile.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

27 months ago

Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York said: They remind me of the pretty young female pharma reps. It's like they first try to become pharma salespersons but didn't get the job so they became recruiters.

Most of them lie, not that bright, don't feel comfortable in the job of recruiter, and are name Ashley, Ericka, Caitlan, etc.

You forgot Brandi and Brittany.

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DesertSunrise in Ypsilanti, Michigan

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: Fair enough, although I stand by my point. If doing the same thing over and over isn't working then trying something new can't hurt. Its not like you're putting hours and hours of time into it. You can still apply to jobs the same way and try other things.

Anyways, I have nothing new to say on the topic.

Letting people know your job history isn't that huge a breach in privacy in my opinion. Than again what do I know, I'm relatively new to all of this so still slightly optimistic.

I'm glad you're optimistic. It definitely makes the job search more bearable. Most people here have been searching for a very long time. I myself have tried so many ways to find a job. I've tried almost all of the job search websites. Walked into several stores and asked for a job in person. Contacted my undergraduate professors several times. Asked family friends. Asked my own dad to put a word in for me at his company.
And none of this worked.
It's very hard to stay positive when so many doors have been slammed in your face. People I thought were my friends have disappeared because they are tired of me asking them for job leads. The professors who I used to work for answer my e-mails telling me they have job leads all the time, but then when I ask them for more information, they never reply back.
Stuff like this can really bring you down. Most of the people on these boards know what I'm talking about. So I hope you can understand why people are not very enthusiastic or optimistic here. We're tired.
I hope you manage to keep that optimism though. It's a good thing to have.

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DesertSunrise in Ypsilanti, Michigan

27 months ago

jenab in Austin, Texas said: But you can lock down your profile and everything else and limit who can see it, including allowing no one to view your profile.

But then what is the point of having a profile on there at all if no one can see it? Nobody is going to e-mail me and ask me to unlock my profile. They'll just move on to the next person who has an open profile. It's a lot less work for them.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: I understand that the primary focus is getting a job - any job. Unfortunately as we all realize here, it is anything but simple.

And there are fewer and fewer employers who will consider someone who clearly is looking for "any job." If they get a sense of that, there are plenty of others who don't. It's a buyer's market.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

27 months ago

sorry that should read as *nice to talk to people who are going through the same thing.

DesertSunrise, I can't let myself get bitter, I am way to young for that and that stuff will poison your thoughts. I was also unemployed for a long time at one point and got severely depressed and angry. It didn't help anything.

I know people are frustrated and ready to throw in the towel...I often feel that way myself but seriously, what is one to do? What can one do except plod ahead? I am constantly trying to figure out what my role is in this. What CAN I DO to make the next interview a success?

I know a few people in my graduating class that called it a day and went to Korea or Japan to teach English b/c it just wasn't working out for them. I'm not at the point yet....we'll see what happens in the next few months.

I just hope my bad streak ends. I have a group interview coming up.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: Anyone who says job hunting is a full time job are the ones spamming resumes all over the place.
It is a full time job, my friend. With all due respect, you would understand better if you were older and had gone through a few job searches during your career. Getting a job requires work.

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Jeff in Denver, Colorado

27 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: Also networking is way overrated. I tried networking many times. It never worked. Except for two brief part-time jobs when I was much younger, every job I've ever had, and I've had a few, I got by walking through the front door, literally and figuratively, and applying for it. That included answering ads.

Networking is difficult when you're unemployed. No one wants to network with you because it's a one-way transaction. You don't have anything to offer them.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

27 months ago

No that wasn't my intention at all.

When I say 'spamming' I mean applying to anything and everything in a shotgun manner. Without any tailoring or even know if you can do the job or not. Like people who say they've applied to 300+ places and haven't received a single response. Thats when you have to sit back and question what you're doing that could be wrong.

Thats what I meant.

Job searching is obviously full time (not just applying, researching, building connections) b/c thats the immediate urgency but if you're applying willy nilly to anything and everything and not getting any responses than in my humble opinion you're going about it wrong.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

27 months ago

DesertSunrise in Ypsilanti, Michigan said: You're starting to sound a bit haughty and judgmental.
He/she is also too young to be judging.

I actually enjoyed reading some of his/her posts until I read that one, especially after I gathered that he/she would be young enough to be my grandchild.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: Thats what I meant.
So write what you mean. It isn't hard. You have shown you can write, and in many ways, quite well.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

27 months ago

My apologies and no disrespect intended, I realized that wouldn't have been received well after sending. My last post is what I intended to write in the first place but I hit submit too quick.

Why do you think so applicant tracking systems are being implemented left and right? It's because its so simple to apply these days (not that its not time consuming for us the potential employee)...fill out a form and click submit or send off a quick email.

If people aren't taking the time to write material that fits the position, or even consider whether they're a fit for the job then thats the reason positions are receiving hundreds if not thousands of resumes, leading to Applicant tracking systems...its a vicious cycle.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

27 months ago

For the record I'm not judging, I'm simply offering my admittedly young perspective on all this nonsense. I too am frustrated but talking about it with my employed peers as mentioned feels awkward since they don't understand/have had better luck/daddy got them the job and haven't done any research.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

27 months ago

DesertSunrise in Ypsilanti, Michigan said: But then what is the point of having a profile on there at all if no one can see it? Nobody is going to e-mail me and ask me to unlock my profile. They'll just move on to the next person who has an open profile. It's a lot less work for them.

It allows you to decide when to make your information available. Your profile can be public, accessible to your connections only, or private.

Case in point; you're working at a company where there is talk of layoffs. You don't want your manager or HR or whoever the executioner is to see your activity on LinkedIn. Or if you are the executioner who participates in a mass layoff. Unless I'm actively looking or working a contract gig; my profile is limited to connections only. The only unsolicited contacts I get is the occasional manager of a group (and it's easy to turn that off).

And you can still reach out to your connections and see their profiles and public profiles of others (depending on their settings). Profiles and connections require mutual opt-in. You can even set it so the only way people who aren't connections can email you is through introductions (the exception to this is if you're a member of a group -- there are group level settings about email as well).

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Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York

27 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: Also networking is way overrated. I tried networking many times. It never worked.

I've personally have known professional people who were downsized and did get jobs again thru networking but were making 1/3 of what they once were making. Not inluding benefits and a longer travel time.

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John in Catonsville, Maryland

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: Yes I understand that but guess what? That era is over. Times have changed and will continue to change, a lot of it is keeping up with the change and being flexible and open minded. Its a whole new world for us young folk too.

Contrary to what you might believe about how much time I spend on LinkedIn, its actually not that much at all. I'll check in a few times a day, if theres any updates to be made to my profile I'll do it. I have emails that'll show up in my inbox telling me about new connections or updates in my network, I take an interest in seeing what my colleagues are up too. I see any new job postings in my feed and then do proceeding research on the company and any connections I might have there.

I think it's truly insanity...doing the same things over and over b/c thats 'how it was done.' Educate yourself to how things have changed and be prepared for more changes ahead. Decreases in job security, contract work and low pay are the name of the game now.

Social media is here to stay, its not going anywhere. I choose to see where the possibilites are not the immediate downsides.

Some of us have tried Facebook and LinkedIn over and over (sometimes for years) with no success. So why should we keep banging our heads against that brick wall(can we say insanity)? You have said it yourself, it is time to try something new. What is that "something new" since FB and LI just does not seem to work for a number of us?

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

27 months ago

Thats hard to determine without knowing how you're going about it, what industry you're pursuing and what your past work experience has been and the urgency for which a job/income is required.

I know from reading various HR blogs that the current system is clearly in disrepair, folks in HR are readily willing to admit this...I've also read about various emerging ideas and new methodologies to take its place eventually. This will all take time. We can only work with what is available currently.

I don't actually reach out to people on LinkedIn, I browse and learn what I can about my industry and the tight knit group of people in it. That info might not help me at this precise moment but it will come in handy at some point I'm sure. I guess I view it in a longer term matter, I'm not expecting immediate results. I have a variety of HR folks from various companies as connections...I also do p/t work in those companies..should an opportunity arise...well, they already know who I am and my work ethic. No guarantee..but than again what is?

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jenab in Austin, Texas

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: Why do you think so applicant tracking systems are being implemented left and right? It's because its so simple to apply these days (not that its not time consuming for us the potential employee)...fill out a form and click submit or send off a quick email.

They're not a new concept; I suspect there are now more affordable versions, or they're a component of an HRIS (HR Information System). But the downside a lot of the older, well known TASs are based on supply chain management.

In 2007 I networked my way into teaching LinkedIn to recruiters at a regional office for a major recruiting/staffing company, which lead to a short term gig as a recruiter. It was eye opening. They hate those systems as much as candidates do, and will avoid using them. The first place we looked for candidates is the people we'd established relationships with; we'd be trolling the job boards at the same time we'd check our own system.

If you're applying online and there are many more fields than basic contact info and uploading your resume (or your resume populates into other fields before finishing the online app), there is very little chance the recruiter will even be able to see your resume. What they'll see is a summary and how well it matched their preferred requirements. And not all TASs parse resumes well.

More systems are integrating with public job search tools, and LinkedIn's recruiting tool takes away a lot of the work, and adds more info (such as the recommendations).

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jenab in Austin, Texas

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: I also do p/t work in those companies..should an opportunity arise...well, they already know who I am and my work ethic. No guarantee..but than again what is?

Job search is now a career long activity; nothing is secure. I've been 'protected' into two layoffs in the past 5+ years -- it's amazing the unexpected circumstances that can occur even when you're careful, even when people are looking out for you.

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Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York

27 months ago

What does protected mean?

Companies you worked for had lay-offs but you weren't one of the employees affected.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: Anyone who says job hunting is a full time job are the ones spamming resumes all over the place.

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: said: It is a full time job, my friend. With all due respect, you would understand better if you were older and had gone through a few job searches during your career. Getting a job requires work.

Agreed; it IS a full time job, especially if you haven't kept all your job search skills sharp when you're fully employed.

The people who quickly find similar work after losing a job are those who are either in a high demand field, or those who are making sure they're looking for opportunities and are fully prepared to take advantage of them when they occur.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

27 months ago

Jenab, read my responses after that. Spamming resumes to job boards in a gunshot fashion does not mean you're using your 40hrs a week wisely.

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DesertSunrise in Ypsilanti, Michigan

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: No that wasn't my intention at all.

When I say 'spamming' I mean applying to anything and everything in a shotgun manner. Without any tailoring or even know if you can do the job or not. Like people who say they've applied to 300+ places and haven't received a single response. Thats when you have to sit back and question what you're doing that could be wrong.

Why are you assuming people on here are spamming resumes? I personally have never applied to any jobs I didn't think I was qualified for. I'm very qualified for a lot of the hourly sales associate positions posted on this site. So if there are about 10 openings a day that I am qualified for, I will apply to all of them. I don't spend a lot of time creating individual cover letters for hourly positions because in my experience managers rarely ever read them. They usually read the resume, and if they want you, they'll call you.
For corporate openings, however, I spend a lot of time crafting my resume and cover letter for that particular job listing. The managers at corporate level are much more likely to take an interest in cover letters and job tailored resumes.
I guess you could say I'm doing things wrong, but I've been at this job search thing for awhile. You learn to realize what job ads require a lot of work, and what job ads don't.
It really depends on the listing, in my opinion. Applying for fast food and retail is not the same thing as applying for corporate level jobs. That being said, I can see why some people can crank out 30 some resumes a week. They are probably applying to service sector jobs that don't require much resume and cover letter altering.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

27 months ago

Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York said: What does protected mean?

Companies you worked for had lay-offs but you weren't one of the employees affected.

Just the opposite; people I reported to tried to protect me. In one case I was moved an account that couldn't be offshored, and in the other a new position was created for me (and that required board approval). Unfortunately both times it led to circumstances that left me vulnerable to layoff (in one case someone else's work ethic, and the other the void left when one left resulted in a re-org after her replacement was quickly fired).

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

27 months ago

I've actually posted this advice in other thread to a young lady close to my age. I'm not saying anyone in here is doing exactly this or implying it either. I'm saying that I disagree with folks be they career bloggers or forum posters who give the advice that job searching is a full time job (strictly when talking about sending off resumes aka 'applying'). I don't know about you but I don't come across enough postings to fit my skills and experience that would take up 40hrs worth of time or resumes sent. It takes me a couple of hours to fix my resume and cover letter to a job posting so I can only imagine what someone whose sent out 300+ resumes is doing. Someone whose tossing generic resumes out there hoping they'll land someplace...well I have to say I have little sympathy for them, view that as harsh if you want. Nobody said this stuff would be easy.

So if it does take you (thats a general 'you') 8hrs each day spend sending out resumes than I would have to say that most likely those resumes are being sent to jobs that aren't necessarily a match. Or yes, you're applying to very general work that many many people could do.

My own streak of luck has been pretty poor. All I can do is provide what's worked for me for thought if 'you' choose to read and consider.

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DesertSunrise in Ypsilanti, Michigan

27 months ago

Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York said: You know you use to be a quiet homely looking girl. How come the change?

I can never figure out your humor, Joe. I can't tell if this is a good or bad statement about me. Either way, it gave me a chuckle.

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Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York

27 months ago

DesertSunrise in Ypsilanti, Michigan said: I can never figure out your humor, Joe. I can't tell if this is a good or bad statement about me. Either way, it gave me a chuckle.

It's good.

The last 2 days of your writings are different than your posts from months ago. There's more fight, bite, clarity, whatever in these posts. I've read and reread them closely because of this.

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DesertSunrise in Ypsilanti, Michigan

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: I don't know about you but I don't come across enough postings to fit my skills and experience that would take up 40hrs worth of time or resumes sent. It takes me a couple of hours to fix my resume and cover letter to a job posting so I can only imagine what someone whose sent out 300+ resumes is doing. Someone whose tossing generic resumes out there hoping they'll land someplace...well I have to say I have little sympathy for them, view that as harsh if you want. Nobody said this stuff would be easy.

So if it does take you (thats a general 'you') 8hrs each day spend sending out resumes than I would have to say that most likely those resumes are being sent to jobs that aren't necessarily a match. Or yes, you're applying to very general work that many many people could do.

My own streak of luck has been pretty poor. All I can do is provide what's worked for me for thought if 'you' choose to read and consider.

You make a good point. I tend to assume that people aren't only sending out resumes during the day. I assume that most are doing other things that add to that 8 hours of job searching. Such as practicing interviewing skills, editing cover letters, calling stores/offices and checking to see if job postings are current...etc.
I was thinking that most unemployed people spend their "work" days doing multiple things. I included these things into the statement of "Job searching is a full-time job." We obviously see the statement differently.
Thank you for clarifying your post, I can definitely see your point now. I agree with a lot of what you wrote.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: I disagree with folks be they career bloggers or forum posters who give the advice that job searching is a full time job (strictly when talking about sending off resumes aka 'applying'). I don't know about you but I don't come across enough postings to fit my skills and experience that would take up 40hrs worth of time or resumes sent.

I'm confused; who is saying that all they are doing is searching job boards and posting resumes? No one is recommending that.

What is involved in job search *is* a full time job. But the bulk of the work doesn't involve cruising job boards and posting resumes. There are far more activities involved and they aren't busywork.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

27 months ago

People in general will make that statement that its a 40hr a week job and how they've send out 300+ applications when realistically its not when it comes to applying to positions. Nobody in particular in this forum is saying it, it was comment I added to my earlier post. I've read it various times on other forums and on career blogs and what have you.

There are still a large number of people literally spamming resumes everywhere b/c they either can't be bothered to put in the time or simply don't understand theres more too it. This ties back into the thread and LinkedIn and (in my opinion and experience) usefulness. If anything I feel a bit more in control knowing that I've investigated and critiqued just like they're doing to me.

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DesertSunrise in Ypsilanti, Michigan

27 months ago

Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York said: It's good.

The last 2 days of your writings are different than your posts from months ago. There's more fight, bite, clarity, whatever in these posts. I've read and reread them closely because of this.

Well thank you. You could say I've matured some since a couple of months ago. Real life has a way of kicking the childishness out of you. I've finally realized that college is over. Nobody cares what I've done or how good my grades were. So now what? I've got to toughen up and move on. I've been working on growing a thick skin and learning how to speak my mind instead of being very passive and quiet. Passiveness and quietness hasn't gotten me a job so far, so I've got to try something new. I guess this behavior change is coming across in my writing.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

27 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: People in general will make that statement that its a 40hr a week job and how they've send out 300+ applications when realistically its not when it comes to applying to positions.

Ahh. That makes more sense, although I think that the 300+ applications is not a weekly thing, but cumulative (or at least it usually is).

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

27 months ago

Even cumulatively, thats a lot. I suppose it makes the person feel like they're doing something but its not helping matters either. That just leads to another cycle of applying > hope > bitterness when nothing comes of it > blame > applying some more using the same method as before.

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