Must Be Able to Work in a Fast-Paced Environment/Meet Deadlines/Stressful Situations

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

38 months ago

I don't think this topic has been brought up before, but I'm the first one to do this. Many companies today want you to be able to work in a fast-paced deadline-oriented environment.

This is literally impossible! Besides not being robots and machines, we are not octopuses either. There is only so much that we can do. It's no wonder that so many people suffer from job-related stress and burn-out. Companies are simply working people to death and that's the bottom line.

I've already told you guys that I quit a few of these telemarketing and market research jobs because I simply couldn't handle the pressure. They were always breathing down your neck and hounding you to produce and meet quotas. I'm very sensitive and I get upset very easily if I'm under pressure. I'm even on medication for major depression and anxiety, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. I even lost a job as a telephone agent because I was falling asleep on the job (which was against company policy). I told them that I was diagnosed with sleep apnea and I gave them proof of it.

I would rather stay out of work for a long period of time than take a job that I know that I cannot handle. It's not worth my physical and mental health.

Tell me how you guys feel about this.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

38 months ago

I also lost two inbound call center jobs because I wasn't processing the calls fast enough and making quick decisions as to how to handle the call. We also had to keep the talk time to a minimum.

One of them was with a company where we were taking directory assistance calls. . The lead operator used to sit next to me on Tuesday afternoons between 12 and 1 to monitor my calls, and I was nervous. There were days that the call volumes were simply too high and they would yell out, "12 on 36". They wanted these calls processed fast. I was then given a final written warning to either improve my performance in two weeks, or else I was going to be let go. As much as I tried my best, it wasn't good enough, and therefore, they ended up letting me go. It was simply for the best. I told them that this type of work was simply not for me. They needed to hire people who were more experienced in answering a high volume of calls.

One of them was with a company that had a contract with the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission. The supervisor monitored the calls very closely. If anybody went over the ten-minute talk like, she would come up to you and say something about it. I had disagreements with her about this. She even said to me once, "Well then you shouldn't work here, Nan."

One day, I was taken off the phone and retrained. Then after I came back from a week's vacation, they not only wrote me up; they cut my hours down to part-time and gave me another month to improve my performance. Well a month later, I was let go; and believe me; it was for the best. I had already decided to look for something else when this happened. I was just simply dealing with too many life-and-death situations simply because these people were being threatened with, or already had, utility shutoffs. My heart just wasn't in it anymore.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

38 months ago

Continued.

It's not your fault that you have to process the calls really fast. You have no control over how many calls come in, as well as how long you have to talk to them. I took the directory assistance job because I needed to get away from the high-pressured telephone fundraising job that I had. A month after I got hired there, I realized that I went from the frying pan into the fire. You had to keep the talk time to a minimum. But this was something that I had no control over. I was able to look up some numbers quickly; but other simply took time. And in this office, if you ever needed a supervisor, you would simply yell out "Supervisor!" Just like making outbound calls; taking inbound calls has also become a production and numbers game.

These are two of the main reasons that I'm trying to stay away from high-volume inbound call centers. I'm very fast at making outbound calls, and this is mainly what I'm looking for.

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MyCon in Georgia

38 months ago

Must Be Able to Work in a Fast-Paced Environment/Meet Deadlines/Stressful Situations…

Hi,
What the heck is this? Every other company requires this in some way or another. We all know it’s a very competitive market out there with every-changing technology & tools. Companies are in business to make money. There has to be some level of companies employees to be able to work, “Fast-Paced Environments & to meet deadlines”… If the company & its employees can’t keep up, then one or both will be out of a job. In most instances, if the employee can’t handle the stress, they will be escorted out.

Additionally, we all like our weekly or bi-weekly paychecks. If other means of income – Fantastic! Then there’s no reason for you to “work” or you can go find your slow-paced work environment, which often comes with a (much) lower salary.

Then again, I suppose there’s unemployment. Can’t get any less stressful than this. Just sit back & collect the paychecks until the funds run out – Is this the “American Way” or “Working to Succeed” the American Way”…

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MyCon in Georgia

38 months ago

Hi Nanlisa,

Yes, you did mention something some time a go & this wasn't a personal attack of any kind. I was just going by your broad statement or title: Must Be Able to Work in a Fast-Paced Environment/Meet Deadlines/Stressful Situations

For most others here, who are for the most part physically healthy can, should or need to be able to work in fast-paced environments. Most jobs required & is expected to have a certain level of stress. Those who can really handle this type of stress, can be compensated fairly well. What that level is is probably a fine line, but those who can keep up (individually & the company itself) are the ones will be able to succeed.

For those who can't handle non-stressed jobs, then there out there somewhere. Also due to the "less stressed environment", the pay is also considerably lower.

So, take your pick.... Work where you can.

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ThePeople in New York, New York

38 months ago

I'm so glad someone brough this topic up. This is exactly how I feel. I've seen it happen at several of the companies I've worked with. And to counter what someone mentioned that this is just business, and that they need to be this way to make money, these arguments leave the human aspect out of what a person can handle. We aren't machines, and the requirements of this "fast-paced" environment sometimes makes me think, is this just another way of saying they're too cheap to hire more staff to handle the volume of work they have? Nanlisa, I agree with you 100%. Companies are working people to death and the part that gets me most is people eat this up and go along with it, then complain about it at the end of the day. Let's be honest here, are people really happy with this?

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

38 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Agreed. But some industries, such as law, scheduled aviation and news, are deadline driven. It comes with the territory and, yes, it takes a toll.

It would take less of a toll if supervisors would let up on their people and realize their people are busting their asses to make 'em happy. One more brilliant idea: Reward their people from time to time, even if it's just to say "thank you."

Oh I agree, Displaced. Aviation is a demanding field. How about the recent stories about that air traffic controller who was sleeping on the job and he got suspended?

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AllandAmerican in San Bernardino, California

36 months ago

I agree with Nanlisa 100 percent. These companies are geting out of control. It's begining to look like an epidemic. It's geting
to a point where it's geting harder to find a job, that you can
work at a a normal pace. Everyone knows, that speed leads to injury and the wear and tear of joints, moving at a fast pace
violate the safety and health of the American Worker.
I for one think, that the goverment should step in and protect the
American worker from these companies clutches.

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Still Look N in Georgia

36 months ago

I agree as well, that's the main reason why I left my last job. The supervisors were always breathing down our necks to get money and meet production. It never mattered how hard we would try...even if we did meet production and got "some" money, if was never enough...they simply were never satisfied. It got to a point where I tried to keep my sh*tty paycheck as motivation for staying, but unfortunely that stopped working, and I quit 3 months later. It's a miserable feeling to see that all you are is a piece of sh*t to these employers. The only value system they have is all about the mighty dollar.

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AllandAmerican in San Bernardino, California

36 months ago

Well Matt, I am glad to hear that you have a good job and a boss who cares about the safty of their employees, but for me I wasn't so lucky. In 2009 I was 46yrs old and I finally landed a job,
after being out work for 2 years. The job requirements were to work
at a fast pace and able to lift about 79 lbs without assistance, I didn't see anything wrong with that, so I took the job, on my first day of traning I was geting help from my trainer, so I was able to keep up, but a few days later I was left alone to work by
myself, before I knew it I found myself strugling, exhausted and on
the floor gasping for air, I almost pass out from exhaustion and my
body becoming overheated from working to fast for more thant 2 hours non stop. Even though some injury were accuring at this
company, I decided to try and hold on to this job for a little bit longer, but after 3 weeks of sufering, I couldn't take any longer, so I resign on the following week. I really consider myself lucky that I wasn't injured during the time I was working there and I hope I don't have to go through something like that again.

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Panix in Gastonia, North Carolina

34 months ago

I am a supervisor in a contact center in Charlotte. Several Years ago we went from placing emphasis on call volume to time available. The goal was improved customer service by eliminating the pressure to rush customers off the phone.

By removing the pressure to take the next call, we managed to improve customer satisfaction, lower our abandon rate, and increased the number of calls taken per agent.

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Wow. in Lawrenceville, Georgia

33 months ago

You whiners are really a sad sack of potatoes. Companies squeeze every ounce of production out of you to keep the cost to the consumer as low as possible and remain competitive. Believe it or not, companies also have regulatory agencies and other stakeholders to answer to.

Choice is something that is highly prized here in America. And in order to give you that choice, companies have to do what it takes to earn your business. Those low prices we like so much are paid off the backs of the workers who toil within the companies whose services we use.

If you want them to hire an abundant and lightly worked force of employees, then you need to be prepared to pay the extra cost of overhead, because those companies WILL pass those costs on to you - the American consumer.

But then again, that would give you folks yet another thing to whine about - higher prices!

You can please some of the people some of the time, but you cannot please all of the people all of the time.

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Frankensense in Warwick, Rhode Island

33 months ago

Wow. in Lawrenceville, Georgia said: You whiners are really a sad sack of potatoes.

Said the person posting in the middle of the day on an unemployment forum.

Telemarketing jobs are ridiculous, honestly. There is never any room for error, you usually get paid a dollar or so over minimum wage, you're constantly watched and critiqued. What you also get with telemarketing jobs is high turn over - so then the company is basically paying to train a new batch of people every few weeks (you usually don't get judged for performance until after your fourth week in with the company - generally two weeks after training) which means keeping a full HR staff and training staff. Then you have people getting fired for not meeting unrealistic expectations, which generally means you need to keep someone on staff who is familiar with unemployment law (probably a lawyer) because let's face it a telemarketing company is not going to pay unemployment for all those people they end up firing.

I would say that the afore mentioned things end up costing just as much, if not more, than paying people decent wages and keeping realistic expectations when it comes to their job performances.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

33 months ago

Wow. in Lawrenceville, Georgia said: You whiners are really a sad sack of potatoes. Companies squeeze every ounce of production out of you to keep the cost to the consumer as low as possible and remain competitive.

What some places expect out of one person is just too much. I've worked at places like that and I've worked at places that are so slow that you could get incredibly bored. I prefer enough work to keep me busy, but not totally wigged out doing the work of 3 people. That's when mistakes get made or people get hurt (in more physically demanding jobs).

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Avg in Medford, Massachusetts

33 months ago

Wow. in Lawrenceville, Georgia said:

Choice is something that is highly prized here in America. And in order to give you that choice, companies have to do what it takes to earn your business. Those low prices we like so much are paid off the backs of the workers who toil within the companies whose services we use.
If you want them to hire an abundant and lightly worked force of employees, then you need to be prepared to pay the extra cost of overhead, because those companies WILL pass those costs on to you - the American consumer.

But then again, that would give you folks yet another thing to whine about - higher prices!

Are you suggesting that higher prices and wages are due to a lightly worked workforce?

Higher prices are do to a lot of things. Sometimes quality is not efficient and sometimes inputs into a product or service, besides labor, are expensive ,but in general,higher prices and wages are usually due to situations where demand exceeds supply.

Yes, choice is something highly prized in America. Depending on the business model of a particular business, the cost savings from low wages can be passed on to the consumer or the investor. The record shows that while the presence of products from low wage countries has boosted the purchasing power of American consumers, the overall effect of low wages is that it is making American consumers poorer over time as Americans lose jobs to workers willing to work for less money. For the last 26 years or more, America has been using borrowed money from developing countries to hide this.

Low wages lead to low prices, but it's self-defeating because low wages leads to low demand, which further lowers prices. It's no secret that the largest market ( group of consumers) in the world have the highest wages.

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Avg in Medford, Massachusetts

33 months ago

designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin said: What some places expect out of one person is just too much.
The pace of work is set by technology and the unemployment rate. If you want to know why people are willing to put up with harsher working conditions than in others, you have to look at the options they have.

You can't please all of the people all of the time, because most of human economic activity above subsistence level is about people taking advantage of other people. That is why many prosperous people up until very recently, had servants or slaves who did all the physical labor needed to secure food, shelter, clothing, etc. The only reason legal slavery isn't legal anymore is because we have machines that run on non-renewable energy that do a lot of the work slaves and animals used to do.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

33 months ago

Frankensense in Warwick, Rhode Island said: Said the person posting in the middle of the day on an unemployment forum.

Telemarketing jobs are ridiculous, honestly. There is never any room for error, you usually get paid a dollar or so over minimum wage, you're constantly watched and critiqued. What you also get with telemarketing jobs is high turn over - so then the company is basically paying to train a new batch of people every few weeks (you usually don't get judged for performance until after your fourth week in with the company - generally two weeks after training) which means keeping a full HR staff and training staff. Then you have people getting fired for not meeting unrealistic expectations, which generally means you need to keep someone on staff who is familiar with unemployment law (probably a lawyer) because let's face it a telemarketing company is not going to pay unemployment for all those people they end up firing.

I would say that the afore mentioned things end up costing just as much, if not more, than paying people decent wages and keeping realistic expectations when it comes to their job performances.

Frankincense: I also did telephone fundraising in downtown Philadelphia at night fifteen years ago. They were constantly calling you in the office over every little bitty thing; (the pledge rate was too low; not following the script; not negotiating, and so forth).

One night I got called into the office because my pledge rate was too low. I was not only written up, I was suspended for three days and I had to go back for retraining. They also put me on 30 days probation, and they were going to evaluate my performance. If it didn't improve within that time period, I was going to be let go.

A month later, the same manager (the one who wrote me up and suspended me), called me into the office and chewed me and another fundraiser out because my pledge rate was too low on one of the colleges that we was calling for.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

33 months ago

Continued

At the end of the shift, I left the office in tears. In fact, there were times that I actually cried right there on the job because I couldn't take the excessive pressure to produce and meet client quotas.

A year later, they sent me home a few times for the same reason; my pledge rate was too low. But the straw that finally broke the camel's back was this. One night, we were called into the office because the pledge rate was too low on the fundraising campaign on WNET, Channel 13 in New York. (They nearly lost the contract because of this.) The same manager told us that "we needed to perform" and all of this other nonsense. I told him that these people (and you know how New Yorkers are) have already been oversolicited by them. At the end of the shift, I told him that I had been putting in applications and resumes in other places; and that I had to do what I had to do. Then he said, "Well I've got to do what I got to do." The next day, I went to apply for what was to be my next job; answering incoming calls from cellphone customers. Three weeks later, I got hired for that job, but I already told you what happened there.

A year earlier, I worked as a telephone market research interviewer at a company that was way too far of a commute for me from downtown Philadelphia; where I was living at time. The supervisor there, a young girl who was my sister's age; kept on pressuring us to get completed surveys. I had just gotten out of a bad job situation, and I went from the frying pan into the fire. I had put up with ten months of you-know-what. And yes, there were times that I cried right there on that job as well. Since I was on unemployment at the time, I just couldn't quit. If I had quit without a necessary and compelling reason (under the unemployment law here in Pennsylvania), I couldn't collect unemployment. It was either that or else be homeless. I finally quit that job and then I took a telemarketing job in downtown Philadelphia; but unfortunately.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

33 months ago

Continued

it didn't work out.

Also, back in the spring of 1990, I took a telephone sales position at a telemarketing outfit right up the street from where I live now. They had a contract with MCI and we were selling MCI Long Distance Services to residential customers of the Mid-Atlantic region. That too was a very high-pressured sales position. They used to have "Persistence = Sales" posted up in the cubicles. One night, while the supervisor was coming around and collecting the sales, I gave her my resignation notice. I had already taken a telephone recruiting job in downtown Philadelphia, I had had enough.

When I left these places, I gave them each statement telling them how I felt about working there and that these were not the right jobs for me.

Back in the 1980's, and even into the 90's, there were plenty of these telemarketing and market research jobs. Believe me, these were very high turnover jobs. They were always running ads in the paper every week, and I know why. They were always hiring and firing people. They hired you right there on the spot, but if you weren't doing good, they showed you the door.

Now I understand why a lot of these jobs have disappeared over the last ten years or so. The Do-Not-Call list has practically put a lot of these places out of business. And besides, people simply don't want to be bothered by these calls.

As much as I love being on the telephone, I am not going to pressure somebody to take a product or service, as well as do a survey, that he or she doesn't want. I'm going to keep on finding me the right job, and that's the bottom line.

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Al in Meriden, Connecticut

33 months ago

Just venting... I confess I didnt read everyones replies. I'd just like to add this... In addition to office jobs, it's everywhere. I've worked in a lab most of my career and can't compete with the young-blood anymore so I HAVE to open my doors elsewhere career-wise so I'm applying EVERY where I can, but they all want the same thing... FAST FAST FAST. Worked at a commercial PC manufacturer. The owner/manager would swear at his employees in front of other employees while wanting them to work ever faster AND more meticulously doing so. For $10/hour... HAH! quit that job. Worked at a liquor warehouse 'picking' for a couple months. They required you CLIMB RACKS (imagine an upright ladder) up to 8' tall and manage to hold up to 6 bottles (with one hand/arm) while climbing up and down. All while doing this in a FAST PACED manner. Couldnt even take a break til the 6 hour point. And I only got that job because I have a friend who works there. Anyway, I look for jobs online at least every other day. AT LEAST 60% of the jobs in my area on careerbuilder.com say FAST PACED ENVIRONMENT. I have high blood pressure and at mid 40s, not ready to start that sort of career. Sure, there's 'lots' of jobs out there... if youre lucky enough to be in a position to make those drastic changes. To make such adjustments for some, it asking too much. It just is.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

32 months ago

Good luck to you, Al. That job climbing ladders and caring bottles sounds like an accident waiting to happen. I hope you don't do that anymore. I'd hate to see you fall and get injured. I say this because my husband suffered a serious injury last year after falling at work. I don't want to see anyone else go through that nightmare.

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Al in Meriden, Connecticut

32 months ago

Thanks Bee. Yeah, forgot to mention I was there only 8 weeks. The pain in my back was so bad I slept MAYBE 30 minutes at a time and it cut into my wifes sleep. Shes the breadwinner so that couldnt happen. I also found myself dipping into the *leftover-from dentist* tylonol with codeine so I knew it was time to quit.

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Bluetea in Texas

32 months ago

Like my ol' Daddy use to say, "You can run a marathon when you are 50 but you ain't ever gonna win one". Heh!

Often times, the ad gives a clue that you are applying for a job that use to be done by 3 other people. Pass on anything that says: "Fast paced, Deadline driven, tight deadlines, self-starter or must be able to lift 50 pounds".

Course, this will eliminate about 50% of all the jobs available.

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NOYB in Saint Louis, Missouri

32 months ago

Saw this little gem the other day. Here is the lead in from the ad:

Do you enjoy working with customers and building professional relationships?

Do you thrive in a fast pace office environment?

As an introvert, I'll say No to question one, and I'll have to say No to question two as well, and I don't want to have to do both at the same time.

Later on in the ad, it listed "provide back up support for a multi-line phone system" as a responsibility... again as an introvert, I'll have to say no thanks.

The position was for a third party/contract worker in a mailroom/copy center environment. Why on earth would I be responsible for manning a switchboard as a copy clerk? Don't most places have more than one seceretary/admin assistant so one can cover the desk while the other one is on break/running errands? I mean there were already a list of other requirements/job duties.

This is what I can't stand with employers these days, they want everyone to be a damn customer service/sales rep and/or be doing the job of three or more people/departments...

Now I imagine that being a copy/mailroom clerk, by customers, they mean "internal" customers-working for people in the building which is what I have always done vs. working with the general public-the very thought of which makes most if not all introverts cringe because in those types of positions you are never given enough opportunity to "recharge your battery" by getting away from the general public because your job IS to work with them for your designated shift.

I know I'm kind of combining forums here but I didn't want to have to write this twice. Good luck to everyone still looking...

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avg in Everett, Massachusetts

32 months ago

NOYB in Saint Louis, Missouri said:

This is what I can't stand with employers these days, they want everyone to be a damn customer service/sales rep and/or be doing the job of three or more people/departments...I know I'm kind of combining forums here but I didn't want to have to write this
twice.
Good luck to everyone still looking...

I hear you. Unfortunately, businesses, and by businesses I mean u.s. consumers and workers have voted with their wallets, to send anything that doesn't require working and building relationships in a fast-paced environment overseas or have a computer do them.

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Jones in Madras, India

30 months ago

Hi all, I think not completing the work before deadline is because of distraction. We do worry lot about something else apart from the work. We don't eat properly on time. We do manufacturing more worries rather than our job. So that we are not able to complete our work on time. We do unproductive things lot during the working hours. Simply at the end of the day if we think ourselves what we did from morning to evening then we come to know the reality that is all ar scrap.

So make our mind peacefully when coming inside to our office. Try this continuosly for 21 days. We can see ourselves better.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

30 months ago

Al in Meriden, Connecticut said: Just venting... I confess I didnt read everyones replies. I'd just like to add this... In addition to office jobs, it's everywhere. I've worked in a lab most of my career and can't compete with the young-blood anymore so I HAVE to open my doors elsewhere career-wise so I'm applying EVERY where I can, but they all want the same thing... FAST FAST FAST. Worked at a commercial PC manufacturer. The owner/manager would swear at his employees in front of other employees while wanting them to work ever faster AND more meticulously doing so. For $10/hour... HAH! quit that job. Worked at a liquor warehouse 'picking' for a couple months. They required you CLIMB RACKS (imagine an upright ladder) up to 8' tall and manage to hold up to 6 bottles (with one hand/arm) while climbing up and down. All while doing this in a FAST PACED manner. Couldnt even take a break til the 6 hour point. And I only got that job because I have a friend who works there. Anyway, I look for jobs online at least every other day. AT LEAST 60% of the jobs in my area on careerbuilder.com say FAST PACED ENVIRONMENT. I have high blood pressure and at mid 40s, not ready to start that sort of career. Sure, there's 'lots' of jobs out there... if youre lucky enough to be in a position to make those drastic changes. To make such adjustments for some, it asking too much. It just is.

Al: Thank God that you weren't seriously hurt. You did the right thing by leaving. If you got hurt, you would have ended up suing them. You were in a dangerous situation. Nobody should have to work like that.

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Bluetea in Texas

30 months ago

avg in Everett, Massachusetts said: I hear you. Unfortunately, businesses, and by businesses I mean u.s. consumers and workers have voted with their wallets, to send anything that doesn't require working and building relationships in a fast-paced environment overseas or have a computer do them.

I avoid those jobs where it says, "Fast-paced, deadline driven, self-starter, independent worker", etc.

That is usually code meaning that you are applying for a job that was once done by 3 other people.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

30 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: I avoid those jobs where it says, "Fast-paced, deadline driven, self-starter, independent worker", etc.

That is usually code meaning that you are applying for a job that was once done by 3 other people.

That's because companies today are becoming more "lean and mean." They want you to do the job of at least three different people.

One Sunday, I went to the pharmacy at the local Acme to pick up my prescriptions, and there was only one guy working in there. On Sundays, only one person works in the pharmacy by himself/herself. But the rest of the week, there is more than one person there. This is crazy! If that were me, I would have complained in a heartbeat!

During the last few months at my first job as a dietary aide at this nursing home (this was back in 1979 and 1980), I had to do everything. Butter the bread, dish up the salads and the desserts, set up the trays, break down the carts, etc. The pots were piling up by the sink until the part-time help came in at 4 o'clock. There was a lot of high turnover in the dietary area. And besides, my last boss there was a you-know-what! I couldn't stand her. I then found my next job as a dietary aide; at the same nursing home where my mother is at today.

No matter how hard you complain, they're not going to listen. It's either their way or the highway, and that's the bottom line. It's no wonder that a lot of people are suffering from stress-related illnesses: companies today are working you to death.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

30 months ago

I never told you this guys, but on Tuesday, January 17, I went to interview for a telephone interviewing and recruiting position, and I was hired the next day.

I started there the following Monday (January 23-which is also my father's birthday), but I just couldn't handle it. The screening and qualifying questions and call result sheets were all on paper. The numbers to call were on the system, and I even had problems with that. I also had to retrieve voicemail messages, write them down on paper, return the calls; as well as go online to check the quota sheets just to see how many surveys they needed and in what category.

With the paper surveys, it was hard for me to determine who qualified for what study. For example, I had recruited a woman in Missouri for this one particular study; only to find out that she didn't qualify, and I had to call her back to cancel it. In the last eight years that I've been doing telephone surveys, everything was on the system, and it was much easier for me to handle. The system kept track of who qualified, who refused, who completed the survey, and so forth. I felt as though I was doing the job of at least two or three different people.

Not only were their surveys done on paper, they do get in difficult studies. They can only train you up to a certain extent. I let the supervisor and the HR director know that this simply wasn't working out for me. Even the HR director said that I just wasn't a good fit for me. I let them know that it's much easier for me to do them on the system, but they're all on paper. I did paper surveys twenty-five years ago, and in this day and age of office automation and being "green"; they use paper surveys instead. It would have also slowed down my dialing and production rates as well. But it was simply for the best.

On that first day, I had to get up a five o'clock in the morning, wait for the bus out in the pitch dark at 6:30, go into downtown Philadelphia to catch the train out to the Western

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

30 months ago

Continued

edge of the city, take another bus to another train stop to meet another bus which takes you into the office center. The bus leaves you off right in front of the company. I had to be in there at 9:30 to fill out some paperwork before the training started at 10 o'clock, and I had to stay until 6. At 6 o'clock, I ran to catch a bus and I forgot to clock out. If I had missed this bus, I had to wait until 7 to catch the next one. I didn't have a transit pass to use on the train line there because of the fare zones. (Normally, I'm still sleeping at 6 o'clock in the morning, and I usually don't get up until 9.)

Anyway, I took the bus to a nearby mall to grab something to eat because I didn't have any supper and that I was going to be getting home late. I then caught another bus back to the the high-speed line that takes me right back here to Upper Darby. Then I caught one of the buses that stops right by my apartment building. I didn't get home until 9:30 and I was just exhausted!

The next morning, I got up after 7 and I had to run to get that high-speed line to catch another bus to get me there on time at 10 o'clock. I felt OK at first, but then I just got tired. I was scheduled to work until 4:30, but I left at 1 because the job simply didn't work out. It wasn't fair to them, myself, or even their clients. I stopped at a Target to do some food shopping and then I headed on home.

Again don't get me wrong now. I worked at another company in that area three years ago. But back then, we did our own schedules, and I scheduled myself from 12:30 to 4:30. I didn't have to worry about dragging myself out of bed at 5 or 6 o'clock in the morning just to get there by 9.

So I'm back to the drawing board again. I'm going to keep on looking until I can find me a job that I feel that I can handle, and that's the bottom line. I'd rather stay out of work for a long period of time than take something that I just can't handle.

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Bluetea in Texas

30 months ago

Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania said: The screening and qualifying questions and call result sheets were all on paper.

Not only were their surveys done on paper, they do get in difficult studies. They can only train you up to a certain extent. I let the supervisor and the HR director know that this simply wasn't working out for me. Even the HR director said that I just wasn't a good fit for me. I let them know that it's much easier for me to do them on the system, but they're all on paper. I did paper surveys twenty-five years ago, and in this day and age of office automation and being "green"; they use paper surveys instead. It would have also slowed down my dialing and production rates as well. But it was simply for the best.

During the interview, they usually will say, "Well, do you have any questions for us?" Yes, you do.

#1 Could you describe a typical day for me?
#2 How much training can I expect?

If they stutter and stammer when answering, pray that they don't call you back. Its often an indication of a The Job From Hell.

I worked a temp job where 3 of us "shared" one computer. Nice yeah? It was only for 3 months, Thank God.

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my advice in Aurora, Illinois

30 months ago

Nanlisa, have you ever tried working as a receptionist at a medical office or a small business? You mentioned enjoying being on the phone without the stress and pressure. You would be answering and making calls but you wouldn't be timed and it would be less stressful than working in a call center! A smaller business or office would be impressed with your customer service background as well. Seeing as time and time again you have realized these telemarketing and call center positions weren't for you, my best advice would be to venture away from that field and try something more service-oriented like a receptionist position. I also hated working in a fast-paced and stressed environment when i worked in the food-industry (Mcdonalds was my first job) and in retail (Macy's). At Mcdonald I hated being stuck on the register and being timed to give out the food under 90 seconds. At Macy's I hated having a goal to open credit card accounts (4 if you were full-time) and meeting my $ goal for the day with the fear of being laid-off if the goals weren't met. i HATED feeling stressed over something I did not have much control of (people don't want to open credit cards in this economy, many people didn't have a good credit so their application would be rejected, etc.) Even though right now I am working some where a little stressful (I work at a dental lab where I need multi-task a lot and many days I end up working over-time to finish my work) I feel less stressed because the job is more laid-back and management understands when we are being in work and I can't finish everything on time. I could never work in a call-center type of environment because I get stressed easily and I am a huge perfectionist so it would take a toll on me if I had to be timed at my job. I wish you the best of luck on your search and remember no job that causes you mental or emotional anguish is worth it because you are better than that!

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

30 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: During the interview, they usually will say, "Well, do you have any questions for us?" Yes, you do.

#1 Could you describe a typical day for me?
#2 How much training can I expect?

If they stutter and stammer when answering, pray that they don't call you back. Its often an indication of a The Job From Hell.

I worked a temp job where 3 of us "shared" one computer. Nice yeah? It was only for 3 months, Thank God.

I never thought of that. Thanks Bluetea. I should have found out much sooner than that.

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Bluetea in Texas

30 months ago

Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania said: I never thought of that. Thanks Bluetea. I should have found out much sooner than that.

Interviewing is a two-way street and there are bad jobs and bad companies out there. I have worked for a few of them.

You want to make sure that you aren't replacing someone who jumped out of the window. LOL!

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

30 months ago

My Advice in Aurora: Thank you for your comments. First of all, I'm way too overweight to be a receptionist. They want these young, slim, glamorous, and attractive girls.

If I was very good with math and figures, I would have considered medical billing and coding. I know it's a hot field. but I'm not very good with math and handling figures. A wrong figure will get you in a heap of trouble.

I took up freelance writing seven years ago, but for right now, writing is the furthest thing from my mind. Having a much steadier income is more important. But eventually, I get back to it.

I've also been taking two writing courses: one for adults and one for children. However, I'm on leave of absence from there until April or May because I'm still laid off.

Back in October, I took up doing online surveys, but if you qualify for them, they pay you very little. I've also checked out doing some online focus groups and participating in some medical research studies as well.

I've been going to the University of Pennsylvania Dental School for some dental work since the beginning of December. When I was there on Wednesday (February 8), one of the senior students there told me about a research study that they're doing. It'll be held on Wednesday, March 14 right there at the dental school. There is no cost and they would pay me a hundred dollars for my time. I let her know that I was very much interested and to please give me a call.

I'm trying to avoid the high-volume call centers, and I don't blame you one bit if it's not the type of work for you. As I explained before, I lost two inbound call center jobs because I wasn't processing the calls fast enough and making quick call-handling decisions.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

30 months ago

My Advice in Aurora: Thank you for your comments. First of all, I'm way too overweight to be a receptionist. They want these young, slim, glamorous, and attractive girls.

If I was very good with math and figures, I would have considered medical billing and coding. I know it's a hot field. but I'm not very good with math and handling figures. A wrong figure will get you in a heap of trouble.

I took up freelance writing seven years ago, but for right now, writing is the furthest thing from my mind. Having a much steadier income is more important. But eventually, I get back to it.

I've also been taking two writing courses: one for adults and one for children. However, I'm on leave of absence from there until April or May because I'm still laid off.

Back in October, I took up doing online surveys, but if you qualify for them, they pay you very little. I've also checked out doing some online focus groups and participating in some medical research studies as well.

I've been going to the University of Pennsylvania Dental School for some dental work since the beginning of December. When I was there on Wednesday (February 8), one of the senior students there told me about a research study that they're doing. It'll be held on Wednesday, March 14 right there at the dental school. There is no cost and they would pay me a hundred dollars for my time. I let her know that I was very much interested and to please give me a call.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

30 months ago

Continued

I've already told you that I lost two inbound call center jobs because I wasn't processing the calls fast enough; as well not making quick call-handling decisions. I'm trying to avoid these high-volume call centers like the plague.

Perhaps I see it as a blessing that a lot of these telemarketing service agencies and market research firms have gone out of business. My blood pressure has come down considerably since I've been laid off, and I'll want to keep it that way. And besides, and I clearly can't stress this enough: the Do-Not-Call list has put a lot of these telemarketing outfits out of business.

Sadly, more of these call center jobs have been outsourced to either India or The Philippines. I'm pretty sure that if you ever dealt with an American company, and you have to call their customer service line, your call is routed over to either India or The Philippines.

I could never do retail. Just like in dietary, you have to stand for long periods of time, and I just can't do it anymore. I also am not comfortable handling money.

Perhaps I should research other careers. If I could change careers at 24, I could do it again at 54. There has to be something out there for me. I guess that I'm not alone. A lot of people are going back to school to seek new careers because their old careers have faded away.

But thanks for your advice Aurora. I really appreciate it.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

30 months ago

Sorry for the double posting.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

30 months ago

My Advice: Funny that you mentioned credit cards. Over twenty-five years ago, I worked at another place in downtown Philadelphia at night where I solicited new department store credit card accounts. As usual, they laid us off periodically due to lack of work. That call center has since gone out of business.

In fact, some of the places that I worked at in both telemarketing and market research back in the 80's and 90's have also since gone out of business.

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amp88lowes4824@aol.com in Roanoke, Virginia

23 months ago

im in the same boat just like yall i work in all types of warehouses factorys and and all the places iv worked in is the pace of work is just to fast i think this is the couse of alot of people like me to
haveing so much trouble in finding work and all the work here in roanoke virgina in warehouses and factorys im too the point were something got to give or theres going to be alot of people out of work.

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