Quitting a temp-to-hire position

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Comments (6)

katie61381 in Hollywood, Florida

24 months ago

I took a job 3 months ago with the understanding that I would occasionally need time off for auditions (I'm an aspiring actress). The client was fine with this. Since then, I've gotten overwhelmingly positive feedback about my work from my supervisor and internal customers. I even won a departmental award in July for my work.

A week ago Monday, my supervisor asked me if my priorities in terms of my acting pursuits had changed and I told him they had not. He said that *his* supervisor expressed concern about my priorities and that they fear I may leave the job in a few months if they hire me on full time. I told him I didn't foresee that happening. Still, he told me that they had started interviewing other people but that no one had impressed him as much as I had yet. There was no conclusion drawn from this conversation and I left feeling confused and, quite frankly, completely put-off. There was no indication that this arrangement would cause them to not hire me on full-time and I've been ensuring my work is complete, despite taking time out on a few days here and there.

My attitude toward the company has soured. Besides that, the work has been unchallenging and extremely slow. The only reason I've stayed is to have the income.

Anyhow, I've made my mind up to quit, and want to make august 30 (next Friday) my last day. Am I out of line in not giving 2 weeks notice to my staffing agency? Honestly, I feel like I could quit immediately, given that they've pretty much told me it's just a matter of time until they let me go. But I would like input on etiquette for quitting a temp-to-hire gig given the situation?

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Bluetea in Texas

24 months ago

katie61381 in Hollywood, Florida said: I took a job 3 months ago with the understanding that I would occasionally need time off for auditions (I'm an aspiring actress). The client was fine with this. Since then, I've gotten overwhelmingly positive feedback about my work from my supervisor and internal customers. I even won a departmental award in July for my work.

A week ago Monday, my supervisor asked me if my priorities in terms of my acting pursuits had changed and I told him they had not. He said that *his* supervisor expressed concern about my priorities and that they fear I may leave the job in a few months if they hire me on full time. I told him I didn't foresee that happening. Still, he told me that they had started interviewing other people but that no one had impressed him as much as I had yet. There was no conclusion drawn from this conversation and I left feeling confused and, quite frankly, completely put-off. There was no indication that this arrangement would cause them to not hire me on full-time and I've been ensuring my work is complete, despite taking time out on a few days here and there.

Anyhow, I've made my mind up to quit, and want to make august 30 (next Friday) my last day. Am I out of line in not giving 2 weeks notice to my staffing agency? Honestly, I feel like I could quit immediately, given that they've pretty much told me it's just a matter of time until they let me go. But I would like input on etiquette for quitting a temp-to-hire gig given the situation?

In general, give a 2 weeks notice unless you are absolutely sure you don't need your current employer or agency for a future reference every again.

Many times, if you give a 2 week notice, they will let you go before that and send you your final check.

Finally, if you do give a 2 week notice, give it in writing and with a copy to yourself. Short and sweet.

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Darius in San Francisco, California

24 months ago

Hey Katie,

It sounds like the company is somewhat scared that you are going to leave since you are not easily replaceable. I'm not sure how the conversation went, and how the tone was, but from the words you said, they are just as confused as you are since there is no definitive "yes" or "no" to when he asked if you would be leaving after they hire you on full time. It might have seemed that way to you when you said something like, "I [don't] foresee that happening." But this answer in their minds means nothing more than, "At this point, I don't want to leave, but I don't know what the future will bring." Which means there is no security in you staying at the company, giving them a higher risk of hiring you on as full time.

Either way, you can always tell them you are planning to leave August 30th, and if they ask you to stay for a full two weeks, that's when you need to know what to say. Either be strong and tell them you are leaving that day, or if you are considering staying the two weeks, ask them what tasks need to be done for you to stay the full two weeks. This will make them have to think about what you really do. If it's simply to give them extra time to find someone new, that may mean they are not valuing you highly, or recognizing you for a specific talent. If you believe you have more talent than they respect you for, leave promptly.

Good luck and be strong.

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Need New Job in Chicago, Illinois

24 months ago

What an odd conversation for your boss to have. Was he trying to be a nice guy and tip you off that they would be replacing you? Or was he looking to see if you'd give up acting if you felt cornered? Either way, what an uncomfortable situation.

If you quit, you need to give notice. Not just to the company, but whoever your temp agency is. You would be amazed at how deep the grudges go for those that people view as unprofessional. It's hard enough to find a job. You don't need to complicate matters by having a quit without notice in your background.

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Katie61381 in Hollywood, Florida

24 months ago

Thank you all for the great advice and perspectives on the situation. I'm thinking that, given my workload, I will offer the August 30 end date and explain that's why I'm not giving the standard 2 weeks.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

24 months ago

There are some things here that don't fit. You said the work is slow. Employers usually work you to death. Yet, they took you on temp to perm. And they also saying they are interviewing just in case you leave.

They are not going to interview unless they are replacing you. Sounds to me like he was preparing you for departure. If work is slow, there is really no need for you there because they would have other people pick up the work (and save money). Why would they take you on tempt to perm, when you made it clear you have other aspirations? Could be they hired you to do work for an employee who is out on leave.

Since this is supposedly temp to perm, you have not been hired permanently. Therefore you owe then no explanations about your future plans.

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