The Right Person (Just What Does It Mean?)

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

25 months ago

We see it in the ads frequently: "will train the right person," "looking for the right person," "seeking the right person." Yet, what does that mean? Everyone who typically applies for the job thinks he or she is the right person. I know I do, especially when I read, "seeking a friendly and outgoing person" with a "strong daily work ethic" who's "motivated, energetic, who can take initiative and be a team player." So, when I apply and don't hear back or I go on an interview and fail to get the job I tend to wonder just what would've made me THE RIGHT PERSON to be interviewed or offered the job.

Sometimes I ask the interviewer if they have any issues or concerns about my background or experience. More often than not it's usually the fact I lack EHR (electronic health record) experience, but that's not something I can't learn (if given the chance). The fact the interviewer doesn't say anything or much of anything just makes me even more curious as to why I'm never hired so I go out on a limb once in awhile to ask just what kind of person they're looking for. The interviewer is usually kind enough to tell me and afterwards I can't help but think I fit the billet perfectly so why am I ALWAYS coming up empty handed in terms of a job? What is it other people have I don't have? Better looks? Better personality? Way more experience? I wish I knew. It'd make my life much easier going forward on future interviews.

That said, if we're not the right person for the job, who is? Just who are these interviewers looking for? Just what does "the right person" mean to the interviewers?

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

25 months ago

One thing that makes me laugh is when I get a call or E-Mail following the interview and the interviewer tells me they're sorry but they've decided to go with someone else, i.e. THE RIGHT PERSON.

How do you know someone is truly the right person until well after the fact? Only time on the job is really going to tell if it was the right person or not.

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Calfornian in Hayward, California

25 months ago

Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois said: We see it in the ads frequently: "will train the right person,"

There are employers who still train? I thought the only place you still had that was in crappy sales jobs where they try to sell you on it with crappy training?

As far as the right person thing, I doubt they know.

I've seen a few gigs roll by in the health care field. They've been hunting for months in a couple of cases but they won't come off the industry experience requirement, which I assume may pertain to things like the EHR. If they waived that they could have brought someone like me in who could do everything they need and pick up the other stuff as I went along.

But employers are bonkers today. There will always be an interview question to the effect of "can you learn, how do you learn", yet, in order to get into that interview, and be asked that question, you pretty much have to already know everything that the job entails.

The butt and the head seem to be related, and in the same place, but they don't talk to one another.

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John in Catonsville, Maryland

25 months ago

Calfornian in Hayward, California said:

There are employers who still train?

As far as the right person thing, I doubt they know.

I occasionally see ads which profess they will train the right person. Not quite all of them have been the nasty sales positions.

As for the "right person", I think we touched on the probably answers in other threads: the interviewer "connecting" with the victim. Is the victim a person the interviewer could see themselves socializing with? Does the victim have similar life views? Is the victim of similar age? It has been mentioned how awkward it would likely be for a 25 y/o to "supervise" someone old enough to be their parent/grandparent.

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Almost Suicidal in San Antonio, Texas

25 months ago

Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois said: We see it in the ads frequently: "will train the right person," "looking for the right person," "seeking the right person." Yet, what does that mean? Everyone who typically applies for the job thinks he or she is the right person. I know I do, especially when I read, "seeking a friendly and outgoing person" with a "strong daily work ethic" who's "motivated, energetic, who can take initiative and be a team player." So, when I apply and don't hear back or I go on an interview and fail to get the job I tend to wonder just what would've made me THE RIGHT PERSON to be interviewed or offered the job.

Sometimes I ask the interviewer if they have any issues or concerns about my background or experience. More often than not it's usually the fact I lack EHR (electronic health record) experience, but that's not something I can't learn (if given the chance). The fact the interviewer doesn't say anything or much of anything just makes me even more curious as to why I'm never hired so I go out on a limb once in awhile to ask just what kind of person they're looking for. The interviewer is usually kind enough to tell me and afterwards I can't help but think I fit the billet perfectly so why am I ALWAYS coming up empty handed in terms of a job? What is it other people have I don't have? Better looks? Better personality? Way more experience? I wish I knew. It'd make my life much easier going forward on future interviews.

That said, if we're not the right person for the job, who is? Just who are these interviewers looking for? Just what does "the right person" mean to the interviewers?

I find it interesting that often the "right person" stays in the job for a year and moves on and I see the job posted again.

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Jeff in Hyattsville, Maryland

25 months ago

The "right person" is the person who has done a very similar job recently and can come up to speed within days without needing any training.

The buzzwords that appear in job ads are a joke. Employers care about 2 things, and 2 things only:
1) having recent experience doing a very similar job and using the same tools and skills;
2) a willingness to buy into the company's vision and "conventional" wisdom.

There are few jobs in which intelligence, education, or motivation are important criteria for getting hired.

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

25 months ago

Calfornian in Hayward, California said: There are employers who still train? I thought the only place you still had that was in crappy sales jobs where they try to sell you on it with crappy training?

Nope. I come across healthcare reception ads that state they'll train the right person. I've even come across some general labor other reception and general office-type work where they've said right in the ad they'll train the right person. Those type of ads STILL exist.

When I responded to ProCare Dental's ad they said they'd train the right person and they did... they trained me.

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Almost Suicidal in San Antonio, Texas

25 months ago

Jeff in Hyattsville, Maryland said:

There are few jobs in which intelligence, education, or motivation are important criteria for getting hired.

Yup! They want a robot programmed for the task.

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jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland

25 months ago

Jeff in Hyattsville, Maryland said: The "right person" is the person who has done a very similar job recently and can come up to speed within days without needing any training.

The buzzwords that appear in job ads are a joke. Employers care about 2 things, and 2 things only:
1) having recent experience doing a very similar job and using the same tools and skills;
2) a willingness to buy into the company's vision and "conventional" wisdom.

There are few jobs in which intelligence, education, or motivation are important criteria for getting hired.

Some day the history books will be describing how we deliberately walked into Great Depression and how management, hiring personnel and employees did everything they could to screw up things that would otherwise be impossible to screw.

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

25 months ago

My mom used to really encourage me to apply for jobs in which the ads states they'll train the right person because as someone with a lack of experience and no useful skill(s), I should be a shoo in for the job. Maybe that was the case 10, 15 or 20 years ago, but not in today's society.

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Jobseeker84 in Atlanta, Georgia

25 months ago

The right person means they know that person through a friend of a friend of the employee that works there.

That, or the way you look just makes them feel comfortable or like you would fit in with the "company culture".

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

25 months ago

Calfornian in Hayward, California said: I've seen a few gigs roll by in the health care field. They've been hunting for months in a couple of cases but they won't come off the industry experience requirement, which I assume may pertain to things like the EHR. If they waived that they could have brought someone like me in who could do everything they need and pick up the other stuff as I went along.

I've seen the industry experience requirement for other things too, which is why I can't really leave healthcare for legal, real estate or veterinary reception work and am stuck trying to make healthcare work.

As I said in my original post, the only hurdle I face in my industry is EHR (electronic health record) experience. All of my experience with records thus far has been with paper records in a manila file folder. What a lot of practice managers and practitioners fail to realize is that it's something I can't learn. I just need to be given the chance to earn it, which is one reason why I've tried focusing my attention on getting into a practice that hasn't switched to EHR yet BUT is planning to switch later on down the road.

And speaking of industry experience, one thing that really grinds me is when I see ads that say you must be proficient in XYZ software. There's thousands of different software out there geared towards practice management. The odds of finding someone who already has experience in Dentrix, Eaglesoft, Eclipse or what have you is like trying to find a needle in a haystack. Maybe if the economy was good and more people were moving round job wise you could. But with so many people being out of work and employed people trying to hold on to their jobs as best they can, the odds of finding someone who've used XYZ software greatly diminish. Just start hiring people and teach them or let them figure it out on the job and acquire it as time goes by.

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

25 months ago

If only employers did manage to get off their high horses and start hiring just anyone, then I think we could start seeing a drastic change in our economy and unemployment.

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

25 months ago

Almost Suicidal in San Antonio, Texas said: I find it interesting that often the "right person" stays in the job for a year and moves on and I see the job posted again.

Yeah, I know.

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jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland

25 months ago

"Clearly, what I had devised, a
nd the way, too, that I went before them to argue for an
earlier departure, did not surprise
them. They must have had a reac
tion of this type catalogued, it
was a behavior pattern characterist
ic of a stalwart such as myself
, assigned an appropriate serial
number in their psycho-technical tables."

Hal Bragg in Return from the Stars, by Stanislav Lem

I bet some of them read this board and rub hands together in a glee, seeing you lament these employment practices exactly the way you do. :))

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jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland

25 months ago

Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois said: If only employers did manage to get off their high horses and start hiring just anyone, then I think we could start seeing a drastic change in our economy and unemployment.

You seem to be setting up a straw man argument. No reasonable person will advocate businesses hiring just about anyone off the street with zero capacity to perform the tasks.
Instead, the logic would dictate that employers hire those most qualified for the jobs.

What we question is the validity and fitness to purpose of the "qualifiers" that are used nowadays, such as a software that asks 100 questions to figure what is already included in your resume which you must upload in order to create a profile with that said software, the so called "industry standards" that are irrelevant to your actual ability to perform tasks (you may have one year experience or be a very bright, talented University Graduate but they would still go with a complete moron who has 20 years of "experience" making hole in his pants or her skirt etc) , and the "screening" processes that in fact disqualify enormous number of qualified people while we can see what type of individuals end up getting jobs and promoted.

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Bluetea in Texas

25 months ago

jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland said: You seem to be setting up a straw man argument. No reasonable person will advocate businesses hiring just about anyone off the street with zero capacity to perform the tasks.
Instead, the logic would dictate that employers hire those most qualified for the jobs.

What we question is the validity and fitness to purpose of the "qualifiers" that are used nowadays, such as a software that asks 100 questions to figure what is already included in your resume which you must upload in order to create a profile with that said software, the so called "industry standards" that are irrelevant to your actual ability to perform tasks (you may have one year experience or be a very bright, talented University Graduate but they would still go with a complete moron who has 20 years of "experience" making hole in his pants or her skirt etc) , and the "screening" processes that in fact disqualify enormous number of qualified people while we can see what type of individuals end up getting jobs and promoted.

In the end, can you ever be as qualified as the hiring manager's sister-in-law?

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jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland

25 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: In the end, can you ever be as qualified as the hiring manager's sister-in-law?

Of course not :))

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Jeff in Hyattsville, Maryland

25 months ago

Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois said: And speaking of industry experience, one thing that really grinds me is when I see ads that say you must be proficient in XYZ software. There's thousands of different software out there geared towards practice management. The odds of finding someone who already has experience in Dentrix, Eaglesoft, Eclipse or what have you is like trying to find a needle in a haystack.

It's easier to decide whom to hire if there are only 1 or 2 applicants who meet your criteria.

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jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland

25 months ago

Those damn software screwed everything. It's like a Religion. Algorithm is a new God and Dogma. Reasoning is shunned and looked upon with disdain (Lord-Almighty Job-giver even has a new Holy Book titled "Theory of Functional Stupidity". What a title for a serious research paper, think of it!)

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

25 months ago

jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland said: You seem to be setting up a straw man argument. No reasonable person will advocate businesses hiring just about anyone off the street with zero capacity to perform the tasks.
Instead, the logic would dictate that employers hire those most qualified for the jobs.

I'm not necessarily saying they should hire just anyone. Let me try to explain this better.

You have a reception opening and 110 people apply. Let's say they narrow it down to the 10 or 12 MOST qualified people. They can only hire 1 person, which means you'll still have 9 or 11 other people STILL looking for work. Maybe, like me, they all lack EHR experience, which is why they didn't get the job.

As I stated before, EHR is something that can be learned. Anyone, for the most part, can do the basic reception functions of answering a phone, patients, and scheduling appointments. It doesn't take a rocket scientists to do that. As for terminology, codes, and coding, no one is born knowing that. Like EHR, it can be learned on the job and usually is, as healthcare receptionists usually don't require a specialized higher education degree in something like Patient Care Coordinator.

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Calfornian in Hayward, California

25 months ago

Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois said:
And speaking of industry experience, one thing that really grinds me is when I see ads that say you must be proficient in XYZ software. There's thousands of different software out there geared towards practice management.

Ah, so my self-centered view that only IT faces these problems isn't entirely true.

I'm very close to giving up on the idea of business intelligence because of this very reason. Whenever you ask someone in business what they need they always say "someone who can understand the business", which to get an interview turns into "must have 3 years experience in whatever they do". Then, the job will list a laundry list of skills in a specific technology with yearly requirements as well. There will be nothing about understanding or learning the business in the job requirements, and just as likely, the interview, will consist of technology questions.

Further, the product lists are a complete crap-shoot. When my old employer replaced their custom business software with an ERP it came down to 3 choices, Oracle and 2 industry packages. Oracle and 1 of the others did a fairly bad presentation and the third came in at the last minute, gave them a helluva price break and won.

The difference between having worked on Oracle and the other brands is roughly equivalent to life-time employment at $100K+ until I retire, vs a product I might as well not even list on the resume. Heck, even the work I did almost doesn't exist because of it.

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Bluetea in Texas

25 months ago

Calfornian in Hayward, California said: Ah, so my self-centered view that only IT faces these problems isn't entirely true.

I'm very close to giving up on the idea of business intelligence because of this very reason. Whenever you ask someone in business what they need they always say "someone who can understand the business", which to get an interview turns into "must have 3 years experience in whatever they do". Then, the job will list a laundry list of skills in a specific technology with yearly requirements as well. There will be nothing about understanding or learning the business in the job requirements, and just as likely, the interview, will consist of technology questions.

Further, the product lists are a complete crap-shoot. When my old employer replaced their custom business software with an ERP it came down to 3 choices, Oracle and 2 industry packages. Oracle and 1 of the others did a fairly bad presentation and the third came in at the last minute, gave them a helluva price break and won.

The difference between having worked on Oracle and the other brands is roughly equivalent to life-time employment at $100K+ until I retire, vs a product I might as well not even list on the resume. Heck, even the work I did almost doesn't exist because of it.

This problem exists almost everywhere but is more acute in IT where the shelf life of a product is measured in months.

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

25 months ago

Calfornian in Hayward, California said: Ah, so my self-centered view that only IT faces these problems isn't entirely true.

I'm very close to giving up on the idea of business intelligence because of this very reason. Whenever you ask someone in business what they need they always say "someone who can understand the business", which to get an interview turns into "must have 3 years experience in whatever they do". Then, the job will list a laundry list of skills in a specific technology with yearly requirements as well. There will be nothing about understanding or learning the business in the job requirements, and just as likely, the interview, will consist of technology questions.

Tell me about it. Technology, computer skills, and EHR experience is definitely front and center when it comes to healthcare and reception work. Then again, it also is front and center for other office-type work such as billing, collections, coding, etc..., which also may be part of your job as a receptionist when you work for smaller practices.

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

25 months ago

I hate the fact every office utilizes something different in terms of PMS (practice management software)and EHR and I really hate it when an office uses an EHR software that's different from the PMS software all because they don't like the EHR component that comes with their PMS software. Each PMS has an EHR component, just use it and keep it all the same.

One thing I'd like to see is a standardized medical, dental and veterinary PMS and EHR software. In other words, everyone use the same software whether it's Eclipse on the medical side of things, Dentrix on the dental side of it, and IntraVet on the veterinary side of it. This way people can move around from medical office to medical office, dental office to dental office or veterinary office to veterinary office a lot more easily WITHOUT having to worry about a different software in other offices, as it'd make it a lot easier to make this line of work a true career for people. I know that's never going to happen though. (Maybe in my dreams.)

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Jobseeker in Lafayette, California

25 months ago

Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois said: I hate the fact every office utilizes something different in terms of PMS (practice management software)and EHR and I really hate it when an office uses an EHR software that's different from the PMS software all because they don't like the EHR component that comes with their PMS software. Each PMS has an EHR component, just use it and keep it all the same.

One thing I'd like to see is a standardized medical, dental and veterinary PMS and EHR software. In other words, everyone use the same software whether it's Eclipse on the medical side of things, Dentrix on the dental side of it, and IntraVet on the veterinary side of it. This way people can move around from medical office to medical office, dental office to dental office or veterinary office to veterinary office a lot more easily WITHOUT having to worry about a different software in other offices, as it'd make it a lot easier to make this line of work a true career for people. I know that's never going to happen though. (Maybe in my dreams.)

Back in my ancient olden data entry days (when the dinosaurs roamed the planet), EVERY job I went to, had different programs I entered information into. But back then, they TRAINED folks on what they had. They literally sat with you, until you "got it". (None of this "quick learner" hit the ground running stuff.) Now, everyone uses Excel etc. I've had classroom training on it, but only just enough to get my feet wet with it. I can see why employers love it, because it does so much. But that "doing so much", makes it complex. Too complex for someone who's not learned it adequately enough. Which is WHY employers REQUIRE a person who's got at least a yr or two of experience with it. Pfft, that leaves me out. :-(

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

25 months ago

Jobseeker in Lafayette, California said: Now, everyone uses Excel etc. I've had classroom training on it, but only just enough to get my feet wet with it.

Just as you can go to a college and take courses for Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc..., I'd love to be able to do that with PMS and EHR, but since there's thousands of different software out there, it's just not possible for a college to really offer a course in something specific. Although, they could try offering courses for some software that seems more in use than others like Eclipse for medical, Dentrix for dental, and Cornerstone for veterinary.

Boy, if only I could start learning these PMS and EHR software programs on my own.

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Bluetea in Texas

25 months ago

Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois said: Just as you can go to a college and take courses for Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc..., I'd love to be able to do that with PMS and EHR, but since there's thousands of different software out there, it's just not possible for a college to really offer a course in something specific. Although, they could try offering courses for some software that seems more in use than others like Eclipse for medical, Dentrix for dental, and Cornerstone for veterinary.

Boy, if only I could start learning these PMS and EHR software programs on my own.

I am sure that somewhere, someone for a price is teaching this. Many companies today have a lucrative side business, teaching and promoting their "software".

I remember when Six Sigma was all the rage and I was unemployed. The certification was 20K. Now, you can get a cert for about 2K. Six Sigma is yesterdays' newspaper.

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Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania

25 months ago

John in Catonsville, Maryland said: I occasionally see ads which profess they will train the right person. Not quite all of them have been the nasty sales positions.

As for the "right person", I think we touched on the probably answers in other threads: the interviewer "connecting" with the victim. Is the victim a person the interviewer could see themselves socializing with? Does the victim have similar life views? Is the victim of similar age? It has been mentioned how awkward it would likely be for a 25 y/o to "supervise" someone old enough to be their parent/grandparent.

Spot on John! I think you answered this question perfectly.

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Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania

25 months ago

Jobseeker84 in Atlanta, Georgia said: The right person means they know that person through a friend of a friend of the employee that works there.

That, or the way you look just makes them feel comfortable or like you would fit in with the "company culture".

Much agree with this as well!

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

25 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: Many companies today have a lucrative side business, teaching and promoting their "software".

Only if you work for an office though. Once an office goes PMS and EHR and picks whatever software they're using, the company reps usually come in to teach it to the current employees of that office.

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Jeff in Hyattsville, Maryland

25 months ago

Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois said: Just as you can go to a college and take courses for Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc..., I'd love to be able to do that with PMS and EHR, but since there's thousands of different software out there, it's just not possible for a college to really offer a course in something specific. Although, they could try offering courses for some software that seems more in use than others like Eclipse for medical, Dentrix for dental, and Cornerstone for veterinary.

Boy, if only I could start learning these PMS and EHR software programs on my own.

IT has the same problem. If you took a class in every language and framework in common use right now, there wouldn't be time to take any other classes. There are commonly used items that almost no college has a class in, like C#, ASP, Perl, Ruby, PostgreSQL, Mongo.

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Bluetea in Texas

25 months ago

Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois said: Only if you work for an office though. Once an office goes PMS and EHR and picks whatever software they're using, the company reps usually come in to teach it to the current employees of that office.

Yeah, its a timing thing. Had I been employed when Six Sigma was all the rage, it wouldn't have cost me a dime.

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Bluetea in Texas

25 months ago

Jeff in Hyattsville, Maryland said: IT has the same problem. If you took a class in every language and framework in common use right now, there wouldn't be time to take any other classes. There are commonly used items that almost no college has a class in, like C#, ASP, Perl, Ruby, PostgreSQL, Mongo.

They are still teaching RPG and FORTRAN.

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Calfornian in Hayward, California

25 months ago

I think there may be a EHR certification of some sort. Might be worth a look.

Excel, is weird to me. I get an employer wanting someone to be able to move around in it. But I often see ads where they get specific about analysis/pivot tables etc. and I never really know how to respond.

A few years ago one of our divisions received a purchasing file from a vendor. They were passing it out in Excel but they wanted it to be on our intranet. So, I sat down, screwed around for a few hours, did some macro recording and wrote a macro to automate the whole thing to a delimited file and fire a PHP script to import the data to MySQL. I've also developed an application that goes way beyond a pivot table.

In other words, I had enough programming knowledge to dive in and solve a problem that was probably more sophisticated than what a lot of these jobs even want, but, when I talk about Excel I don't know how to respond. For instance, I led the change in our accounting department from Lotus 1-2-3 to Office in 1995. Does that mean I have 18 years of experience? Since then I've barely used it except for the quick one-offs and the project I mentioned earlier.

It's just weird to sit there and have someone try to qualify you on something like Excel given the above. The whole thing makes no sense.

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Calfornian in Hayward, California

25 months ago

Jeff in Hyattsville, Maryland said: IT has the same problem. If you took a class in every language and framework in common use right now, there wouldn't be time to take any other classes. There are commonly used items that almost no college has a class in, like C#, ASP, Perl, Ruby, PostgreSQL, Mongo.

I do business intelligence, or am trying to, and what I commonly find is "must have 4 years in OBIEE (or some other poison)". So, business intelligence will list say 100 jobs, but with all the software variants you are really only qualified, by the standard of the req, for 3 of them assuming they don't also want industry experience and/or an advanced degree that can also be pretty variable. And being in the Bay Area those 3 jobs might be 15 minutes away or 2 hours away.

And the real catch is that the guys who have that experience got it 1 of 2 ways. First, random blind luck dropped the product in their laps. Second, they lied about their abilities. I'm getting pretty convinced that this is the secret of success for at least one nation in this game.

And I still try to keep on plugging for some reason.

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Jeff in Hyattsville, Maryland

25 months ago

Calfornian in Hayward, California said: I do business intelligence, or am trying to, and what I commonly find is "must have 4 years in OBIEE (or some other poison)". So, business intelligence will list say 100 jobs, but with all the software variants you are really only qualified, by the standard of the req, for 3 of them assuming they don't also want industry experience and/or an advanced degree that can also be pretty variable. And being in the Bay Area those 3 jobs might be 15 minutes away or 2 hours away.

And the real catch is that the guys who have that experience got it 1 of 2 ways. First, random blind luck dropped the product in their laps. Second, they lied about their abilities. I'm getting pretty convinced that this is the secret of success for at least one nation in this game.

And I still try to keep on plugging for some reason.

What it amounts to is that in IT you have to always have the "right" job, a job that gets you experience in whatever the next round of hiring is going to require. You are dependent on your current employer to set you up for your next job. If you don't get to use the trendy things at your job, finding a new job is extremely difficult.

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Calfornian in Hayward, California

25 months ago

Jeff in Hyattsville, Maryland said: What it amounts to is that in IT you have to always have the "right" job, a job that gets you experience in whatever the next round of hiring is going to require. You are dependent on your current employer to set you up for your next job. If you don't get to use the trendy things at your job, finding a new job is extremely difficult.

Or, in other words, rely on the gods of chance. It's an awesome way to pick a career.

Or, you could just start over at the bottom every few years until you hit 30 and the crystal in your hand turns black.

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Bluetea in Texas

25 months ago

Jeff in Hyattsville, Maryland said: What it amounts to is that in IT you have to always have the "right" job, a job that gets you experience in whatever the next round of hiring is going to require. You are dependent on your current employer to set you up for your next job. If you don't get to use the trendy things at your job, finding a new job is extremely difficult.

Yet another reason to avoid IT like the plague.

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

25 months ago

Calfornian in Hayward, California said: I think there may be a EHR certification of some sort. Might be worth a look.

I know some of the companies, like Dentrix, offer workshops. But if there's none near me and, of course, there's always the cost and for someone on a tight budget, like me, that could be a problem. There's On-Demand learning, but that's usually for their customers' employees. The same goes for study clubs/groups. Can always access training videos online but that's NOT the same. I want hands-on experience with the software.

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Jason Mantle in Singapore, Singapore

25 months ago

I guess "the right person" has got something to do with chemistry between the interviewer and interviewee. Companies usually just find someone to 'complement' the team, be it professional reason (someone with skills that others don't have) or personal reason (for example a funny person to lighten up the office). Therefore, "the right person" is very subjective!

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Joe Gagill in Poughkeepsie, New York

25 months ago

Jason Mantle in Singapore, Singapore said: I guess "the right person" has got something to do with chemistry between the interviewer and interviewee. Companies usually just find someone to 'complement' the team, be it professional reason (someone with skills that others don't have) or personal reason (for example a funny person to lighten up the office). Therefore, "the right person" is very subjective!

She's out of my life Jason. I guess I wasn't the "right person."

I guess there wasn't enough chemistry, I didn't complement her enough, I wasn't professional, or I flat out wasn't really as funny as I thought I was.

What should I do?

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still retired in Texas

25 months ago

Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois said: Only if you work for an office though. Once an office goes PMS and EHR and picks whatever software they're using, the company reps usually come in to teach it to the current employees of that office.

I have often learned through volunteering. Some public dental clinics in Texas get sponsored by big corporate companies that supply them with incredible software such as dentrix, eaglesoft and so forth. If you can find a public dental clinic and even if they dont have the ideal software you also find office personel ppl you could possibly network with not to exclude the retired dentist. Some of those dentist know someone who know someone else and prolly even sold their practice to the new guy. Just a suggestion.

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Jobseeker84 in Atlanta, Georgia

25 months ago

Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania said: Much agree with this as well!

Hey there :) How's it going?

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joobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland

25 months ago

The "right person" is someone who is capable of pretending that there is no Trollhood and no Troll practices involved , in hiring, stated objectives and work practices of a company one applies to.
That's like going to a circus as a clown, wearing a big red nose, yet pretending all is dead serious and business as usual.

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Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania

25 months ago

Jobseeker84 in Atlanta, Georgia said: Hey there :) How's it going?

Hey Jobseeker84! Hanging in there. Keeping busy and enjoying the summer. Hope all is well on your end.

Some of this stuff on the boards has had me literally laughing out loud. Guess that is a good thing :)

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Jobseeker84 in Atlanta, Georgia

25 months ago

Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania said: Hey Jobseeker84! Hanging in there. Keeping busy and enjoying the summer. Hope all is well on your end.

Some of this stuff on the boards has had me literally laughing out loud. Guess that is a good thing :)

Same here, I'm really trying to hang in there. Last night I told one of the ladies that I was working with at a temp gig downtown that I was gonna find a bridge to jump off of and she would see it on channel 2 news. She said "oh don't say that, you're OK, you're making money." We made 66 dollars for that one time deal. She was trying to be helpful, but it wasn't. Yes these folks on this board are a real trip, It pulled me out of the dour mood I was in :P. I was totally being serious. I couldn't even enjoy being downtown because that gig just pulled my spirit down. The "professionals" weren't behaving very professional at all. They were on a business trip paid for by their company and they didn't even have the decency to be nice to us "lesser thans". I shouldn't have expected it, but it would have been nice. I was still nice to them though. It sucked.

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Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania

25 months ago

Jobseeker84 in Atlanta, Georgia said: Same here, I'm really trying to hang in there. Last night I told one of the ladies that I was working with at a temp gig downtown that I was gonna find a bridge to jump off of and she would see it on channel 2 news. She said "oh don't say that, you're OK, you're making money." We made 66 dollars for that one time deal. She was trying to be helpful, but it wasn't. Yes these folks on this board are a real trip, It pulled me out of the dour mood I was in :P. I was totally being serious. I couldn't even enjoy being downtown because that gig just pulled my spirit down. The "professionals" weren't behaving very professional at all. They were on a business trip paid for by their company and they didn't even have the decency to be nice to us "lesser thans". I shouldn't have expected it, but it would have been nice. I was still nice to them though. It sucked.

I understand all that you are saying. I sure have moments like that as well. Truly, I get thoroughly irritated by anyone employed that tries to tell me that I just need to try harder or that I should contact this source or that source. Amazing how insensitive they sound. It's only a matter of time until they get knocked down a peg or two.
As for some of these employers? The tables will turn on more than a few of them when they are left standing there, scratching their heads, wondering why the job that was meant for 3 people isn't getting done by one.

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Jobseeker84 in Atlanta, Georgia

25 months ago

Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania said: I understand all that you are saying. I sure have moments like that as well. Truly, I get thoroughly irritated by anyone employed that tries to tell me that I just need to try harder or that I should contact this source or that source. Amazing how insensitive they sound. It's only a matter of time until they get knocked down a peg or two.
As for some of these employers? The tables will turn on more than a few of them when they are left standing there, scratching their heads, wondering why the job that was meant for 3 people isn't getting done by one.

Yep, they don't get it, but as sure as the sun shines, they will see what it's like on the other side. It's draining because looking for work is a constant basis. We don't get a vacation for this. I try to take time out for myself before I go crazy but it never ends.
Glad you are doing well and enjoying the summer sun :). Makes me want to listen to 'all summer long' by the beach boys and pretend I'm sitting poolside with a glass of lemonade (umbrella included). Enjoy the rest of your evening :).

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Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania

25 months ago

Jobseeker84 in Atlanta, Georgia said: Yep, they don't get it, but as sure as the sun shines, they will see what it's like on the other side. It's draining because looking for work is a constant basis. We don't get a vacation for this. I try to take time out for myself before I go crazy but it never ends.
Glad you are doing well and enjoying the summer sun :). Makes me want to listen to 'all summer long' by the beach boys and pretend I'm sitting poolside with a glass of lemonade (umbrella included). Enjoy the rest of your evening :).

Let's just say I am doing well as I can. It's a fight some days, but I am a lot better at letting myself "off the hook", now that I get that this prolong search is NOT my fault, nor anyone else that is sincerely trying to find a job. Going to that mandated meeting, courtesy of the U.C. office, was a huge booster. I was actually able to put faces to what I have been experiencing for months.

Hang in there Jobseeker84. Have a wonderful evening yourself :)

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