Salary requirements.....Asking for with submitting your resume & at interview

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Comments (19)

KiKi in Neptune, New Jersey

24 months ago

Hi Everyone

It is so hard to answer "appropriately" these days to both stated above. Even if you research the salary for the position and come down a bit, it's so hard to tell. Like I've read in other posts, its like employers are bargain hunting for employees-who will work the cheapest & it's obviously HORRIBLE!

So, whats a good gauge for answering about salary requirements? Do you just give your bottom line number on what you can scrape by on to live on without regard to the actual work involved/appropriate salary for the position? (which seems a bit crazy but with this sh*tty job market, who knows)

I had an interview last week, when pushed about salary requirements, I came down about 10g a year from the research I did for salary for that position and less than my current position (partly because it was so close to home and would save on gas, etc.) I ended up not getting the position, even though the interviewer just about said everything but you have the job. (pissing me off, dont understand, but that's another story)

It seems so many companies want you to include your salary requirements with your resume, how do you go about that so your resume will even be looked at?

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Jeff in Denver, Colorado

24 months ago

If you put a number that's too high, you'll price yourself out of the job. If you put a number that's too low, they'll think that you're either desperate or not very good. This question is guaranteed to give ulcers.

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Frankie in San Jose, California

24 months ago

- Put "Open, will consider any reasonable offer";

- If a number must be given, look up 'G l a s s d o o r dot com' uner 'Salary' for the company and gauge if they pay market rate, if the general fee is they're lowballing their employees, and you're desperate for a job, then put in a lower figure.

Once you're offered a job, then re-negotiate, I did and I got 30% more! You can imagine how low the salary they quoted me when I received the initial HR call, I was furious but answered "yes, sure..."

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Frankie in San Jose, California

24 months ago

- If a number must be given, look up 'G l a s s d o o r d o t c o m' under 'Salary' for the company and gauge if they pay market rate, if the general fee is they're lowballing their employees, and you're desperate for a job, then put in a lower figure.

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Frankie in San Jose, California

24 months ago

Meant to read: " ...if the general FEEL is they're lowballing their employees..."

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

24 months ago

Jeff in Denver, Colorado said: If you put a number that's too high, you'll price yourself out of the job. If you put a number that's too low, they'll think that you're either desperate or not very good. This question is guaranteed to give ulcers.

The whole job search gives ulcers......Employers, recruiters, HR depts over think and analyze your every word. Like you always hear, better to look for work when you already have a job.

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

24 months ago

I always like to get as much as possible during the negotiation part in regards to salary. Because once you start working they can and often will nickel and dime you to death and even not give a raise at the end of the year sometimes. HEEHAAW! Just felt like saying that.

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

24 months ago

GlaasDoor rules! Very good site.

There's also CareerBliss but not as good.

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Kim in Chicago, Illinois

24 months ago

When filing out applications online the salary must be numeric. It will not accept open or negotiable. They want to know your number and not a range. Why don't they make it simple and state the salary. The starting salary for this position is $10 an hour. Either you apply or don't. In today's economy they would still get many applicates that would apply as they know people who have been out of work will take anything. I know it is sad the people get excited about a $10 an hour job, especially when some have worked for that pay 20 years ago or more.

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Bluetea in Texas

24 months ago

Kim in Chicago, Illinois said: When filing out applications online the salary must be numeric. It will not accept open or negotiable. They want to know your number and not a range. Why don't they make it simple and state the salary. The starting salary for this position is $10 an hour. Either you apply or don't. In today's economy they would still get many applicates that would apply as they know people who have been out of work will take anything. I know it is sad the people get excited about a $10 an hour job, especially when some have worked for that pay 20 years ago or more.

Why that would just make too much ssnse. LOL!

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

24 months ago

Kim in Chicago, Illinois said: When filing out applications online the salary must be numeric. It will not accept open or negotiable. They want to know your number and not a range. Why don't they make it simple and state the salary. The starting salary for this position is $10 an hour. Either you apply or don't. In today's economy they would still get many applicates that would apply as they know people who have been out of work will take anything. I know it is sad the people get excited about a $10 an hour job, especially when some have worked for that pay 20 years ago or more.

I'm out of work and I will NOT take any salary.

I believe companies don't usually post salaries because they don't want competitive companies in the same industry seeing them. I could be wrong though since I'm not too bright.

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Bluetea in Texas

24 months ago

Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York said: I believe companies don't usually post salaries because they don't want competitive companies in the same industry seeing them. I could be wrong though since I'm not too bright.

You are right. As a rule, only the public sector posts their pay grades and that is because they have no competition. Probably only one first department in your town and only one judicial system in your county. Take it or leave it.

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

24 months ago

Frankie in San Jose, California said: - Put "Open, will consider any reasonable offer";

- If a number must be given, look up 'G l a s s d o o r dot com' uner 'Salary' for the company and gauge if they pay market rate, if the general fee is they're lowballing their employees, and you're desperate for a job, then put in a lower figure.

Once you're offered a job, then re-negotiate, I did and I got 30% more! You can imagine how low the salary they quoted me when I received the initial HR call, I was furious but answered "yes, sure..."

Living in San Jose you should of asked for 40 percent more.

What are your property taxes there?

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Jeff in Denver, Colorado

24 months ago

Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York said: I'm out of work and I will NOT take any salary.

I believe companies don't usually post salaries because they don't want competitive companies in the same industry seeing them. I could be wrong though since I'm not too bright.

Could be. I always thought it was because they were hoping that employees would ask for less than they were actually willing to pay.

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Parafreegal in Chicago, Illinois

24 months ago

Why don't they just call 100 applicants to an auction house and have them bid on the salary? That way, they get people working for peanuts. That's almost where we're heading since the pool of candidates is endless.

Ten dollars!

Do I hear nine?

Nine dollars!

Eight seventy five!

Do I hear Eight fifty?

I'll pay you if I can sit in the AC for eight hours a day!

Sold!

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Bluetea in Texas

24 months ago

Parafreegal in Chicago, Illinois said: Why don't they just call 100 applicants to an auction house and have them bid on the salary? That way, they get people working for peanuts. That's almost where we're heading since the pool of candidates is endless.

Actually Robert Reich in his "Aftershock" uses that analogy. Wages have been driven down because the supply of cheap labor (that would be you and me), far outnumbers the demand for us. We are acutally bidding on every job, like a painting contractor would.

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Drummer in Hobart, Indiana

24 months ago

Does anyone want to volunteer, so we can see if you are going to ba a good fit? When the trail period is over, they dispose of you like a newspaper in the trash. Repost the ad, to find another volunteer.

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Frankie in San Jose, California

24 months ago

Reputable companies pay market rate because they know good staffs will leave if they don't pay competitive package. The ones who take advantage of this horrific job market by lowballing employees and treating them shabbily want to:
1)transfer X% of the 'savings' (from paying shi%$y wage) to the CEO and his lieutenants, it's a number's game;
2)reduce payroll expense hence achieving 'cost efficiency' making the management look good; and they usually are compensated for that .... pretty sad!

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Bluetea in Texas

24 months ago

Frankie in San Jose, California said: Reputable companies pay market rate because they know good staffs will leave if they don't pay competitive package. The ones who take advantage of this horrific job market by lowballing employees and treating them shabbily want to:
1)transfer X% of the 'savings' (from paying shi%$y wage) to the CEO and his lieutenants, it's a number's game;
2)reduce payroll expense hence achieving 'cost efficiency' making the management look good; and they usually are compensated for that .... pretty sad!

Worked pretty good for this guy. LOL!
now.msn.com/money/0706-CEO-fired-44-million.aspx

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