Writing an article about negative recruiter experiences

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Comments (20)

parafreegal in Chicago, Illinois

55 months ago

1. Absolutely not.

2. Yes. They got me to fill out a cover letter and an email. I went in to meet two or three, had smoke blown up my backside and then never, ever heard from them again. Recruiters play the game I call the Circle of Nothing. I've discussed it elsewhere.

3. Recruiters don't care about how a candidate might fit into a job and whether the candidate will want it or not. Recruiters only care about getting that fanny into that seat either temporarily or permanently because it means dollars in the recruiter's pocket. Performance, abilities and fit mean nothing when it comes to the candidate.

By the way, great name. I wish I would have thought of it.

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Liz in Chicago, Illinois

55 months ago

I saw invoices that the agency sends out the first day a person starts the job. They call the client and asked if the person showed up, yes that immediately generates and invoice. At that time everyone was direct hire, no resumes, and it took a person over two months to reach that amount in wages. This is going way back, when it was much easier. A phone call to set up an interview, get feedback, hired, call candidate for start date, oftne next day if they were not working and wow an easy check. Way over priced!
With the fake jobs, once they got the resume, they tell you all kinds of lies, the client has not responded, they hired an internal candidate, it is on hold, they are just starting and want more resumes or silent treatment. All boils down to that the job was never real and they just wanted to get a name to call to see if they are hiring, since you left the job, it must be vacant.
Some recruiters are recent college grads, never hired anyone before, but good at trying to get someone to buy something, in tis case it is trying to get employers to give them temps as a way of business. Can't force an employer to hire when they just laid off a dozen workers.

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Nick in Linden, New Jersey

55 months ago

1 No.
2. Yes. Many realtors also do this. I've had jobs and apartments that were never available to begin with.
3. I've had recruiters basically tell me that I couldn't get into the things that I wanted, and I would instead be assigned jobs as if they were just picking from a menu. I clearly have 15 years of customer service/sales experience plus 2 years as a university faculty assistant, and all of that seemed to mean spit to them. They almost actively kept me away from higher education.

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Nick in Linden, New Jersey

55 months ago

Also just as an aside, having a wet behind the ears 24 year old tell me (at 32) that I don't have experience is insulting. I can imagine how insulting it is for someone even older than me. Son, I was graduating high school when you were 8. If 15 years of work experience counts for nothing, then your recruiting service is useless to me.

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Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

55 months ago

The first time I ever dealt with a recruiter, the recruiter tried to hold me responsible for her fee. I interviewed for a fee-paid position. At the end of the interview she pushed a contract at me. The contract would have bound me for her fee were her client to fire me. I walked out. I then spoke by phone with the president of the agency. The president was most dismissive. She said their clients and not their candidates were their first priority.

Recruiters have told me this practice is irregular. I doubt it. I submit that if this reecruiter did it, so do others.

A law firm at which I interviewed rejected me. A couple of weeks later, I answered a legal recruiter's ad. I was suited for the position. I knew of the recruiter because she officed in my building.

The recruiter badmouthed the shareholder of my law firm during our interview. She asked where I had applied for jobs, she said, to avoid duplication. I inadvertently omitted the firm that rejected me. A few days later, she called me. Turns out that law firm was her client!! She reamed me for not giving her its name and accused me of trying to make her "look bad." Now why would I do that? What purpose would it serve? She was very rude. Her badmouthing of my boss was also rude.

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Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

55 months ago

Since when was it the candidate's responsibility not to make a recruiter "look bad"? And where was the harm? All her client had to say was it had already interviewed me. Not only that, it is well known recruiters pump candidates for employer contacts to find out openings to push their services and other candidates at these employers.

I have had other recruiter experiences. My wife has had experiences of her own. Between the two of us, we have enough recruiter experiences to know they are a complete and utter waste of time, and to never, ever deal with them.

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parafreegal in Chicago, Illinois

55 months ago

Yes, recruiters are rude, liars and don't know what they're talking about a lot of the time. I imagine they have to lie to 99% of the candidates with whom they communicate. Now, how is that any way to live?

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Californian in San Francisco, California

55 months ago

The more interesting are the temporary/contract agencies. Some of them will take more than 50% of the bill rate. So, they bill the client $60/hr, you get $30/hr. Some will go after even more than that.

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RecruiterHater in Vancouver, British Columbia

55 months ago

Thank you for sharing your experiences.

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Mech-Phree in Chicago, Illinois

55 months ago

1. Yes, i've also noticed weird pay differences between me and another temp to hire employee who worked the same position as me, had no experience like me (at least from what he told me) but he was starting off getting paid more money then me an hour...

2. I wouldn't say i've had fake jobs come my way, I will say i've had recruiters tell me "so and so " is hiring or there staffing company is looking for xyz only to find out when You apply xyz is moving slow as molasses on the paper work .

3. Yea, I can see that happen. In my case, my field is clearly in the environmental/construction industry, but if allowed I know some staffing companies will try to make you work warehousing or desk jobs.

In my experience with recruiters, they've been very nice but mostly ineffective in my job search. One recruiter whom I contact we had great chemistry when we first met, but after that first or second meeting never heard back from her. I'd email her about jobs posted on the company website and get nothing , or extremely delayed responses.

I feel most recruiters these days have an over abundance of candidates, so them getting back to you isn't the first priority..

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sage2cents in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

55 months ago

My favorite is when the recruiter contacts me. They have a job to fill, saw my linked in profile and I'm "perfect." After a quick chat one of two things inevitably happens:

A) They tell me they are submitting my resume to the client and then I never hear anything back from them ever - not even when I follow up with them - until the next time they have an opening and contact me again because I'm "perfect." This has happened with several recruiters but 1 recruiter does this repeatedly to me about every 2 months.

B) Again, the recruiter contacts me because I'm "perfect." The client needs someone with an MBA or other graduate degree (I have an MBA and an MSc in my field) and 8+ yrs experience to do the job of 3 people combined into 1 title. They will send my resume over to the client if I will accept $32,000 a year.
In this scenario, which seems to be an increasing trend over the last 4 months, either: the client is well beyond living in a fantasy world to think that even in this terrible job market they can find someone so desperate as to work for less than 1/2 market value, hence they hired a recruiting agency to do their dirty work; or the position pays a little below market value and the recruiter is taking 1/2 of the employees salary to line their pockets.
Either way, my answer is no thanks.

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Nick in Linden, New Jersey

55 months ago

sage2cents in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania said: My favorite is when the recruiter contacts me. They have a job to fill, saw my linked in profile and I'm "perfect." After a quick chat one of two things inevitably happens:

A) They tell me they are submitting my resume to the client and then I never hear anything back from them ever - not even when I follow up with them - until the next time they have an opening and contact me again because I'm "perfect." This has happened with several recruiters but 1 recruiter does this repeatedly to me about every 2 months.

B) Again, the recruiter contacts me because I'm "perfect." The client needs someone with an MBA or other graduate degree (I have an MBA and an MSc in my field) and 8+ yrs experience to do the job of 3 people combined into 1 title. They will send my resume over to the client if I will accept $32,000 a year.
In this scenario, which seems to be an increasing trend over the last 4 months, either: the client is well beyond living in a fantasy world to think that even in this terrible job market they can find someone so desperate as to work for less than 1/2 market value, hence they hired a recruiting agency to do their dirty work; or the position pays a little below market value and the recruiter is taking 1/2 of the employees salary to line their pockets.
Either way, my answer is no thanks.

Sorry to say, they'll find someone else. I've been desperate enough to take a job...ANY job, just to have an income. I'm sure I'm not alone.

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sage2cents in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

55 months ago

Nick in Linden, New Jersey said: Sorry to say, they'll find someone else. I've been desperate enough to take a job...ANY job, just to have an income. I'm sure I'm not alone.

True, but I can't pay my mortgage and student loans on that, let alone eat. I do much better consulting part time on freelance projects while I continue to look for full time work.

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parafreegal in Chicago, Illinois

55 months ago

I don't think a recruiter would pocket a portion of the salary and leave you with the $32K. That's not how it works to my knowledge.

My understanding is that the recruiter would get a percentage of whatever the agreed upon salary is. So the recruiter would want your salary to be the highest possible. That's why those idiots want to do all the negotiation - because they're negotiating their commission, the blood suckers.

Avoid recruiters.

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Mech-Phree in Chicago, Illinois

55 months ago

From my understanding they take a percentage of your salary on TOP of your hourly rate. I'd advise against recruiters in managerial or director positions...they will try to pay you half market rate to pocket the other half for the company

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Hello in Santa Monica, California

55 months ago

Interesting post. I met a recruiter who explained "other side" of this to me a couple of months ago:

1. Did you know that the recruiter gets paid 20% of your salary if you get hired? Are they worth it in your opinion?

It's worth it to the companies. They farm out difficult or niche positions to external headhunters because externals can do things their internal team isn't allowed to do, such as poach from competitors or b/c they don't want to waste months on filling a specialized position. Also, external headhunters are able to do a lot better salary negotiating than internal HR, because they will know how high the company is willing to go up to and the minimum salary expectation of the jobhunter. Imagine you say "I need to make at least $75k" and the company is willing to pay at least $100k. It works out, and the recruiter says "I talked them up to $85k"... Everyone "wins".

It's the company that is making the payout, not you. You are only doing them a service if you contain the specialized skillset the company needs.

2. Many recruiters post fake jobs to lure you in. Has this happened to you, and what was the outcome?

I don't think this happens often. Temp agencies may do this occasionally for generic roles such as admin, but I don't think you'll see any fake postings for a job that is specialized.

3. Recruiters often try to fit candidates into jobs they don't want. What has your experience been with this?

I have experienced this. I say "Not interested".

There are 3 different types of "recruiters".
(a) Internal recruiters work for a specific company and fill internal openings exclusively.
(b) External recruiters/Headhunters work mostly w/ difficult-to-fill roles (engineers, c-level execs, etc) and work independently or with an external agency. They work for ommission.
(c) Temp Agencies provide contract workers. You work for them and they pay you out of what they bill the co. If you get hired, they get a fee.

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job-seeker in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

53 months ago

Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: Since when was it the candidate's responsibility not to make a recruiter "look bad"? And where was the harm? All her client had to say was it had already interviewed me. Not only that, it is well known recruiters pump candidates for employer contacts to find out openings to push their services and other candidates at these employers.

I have had other recruiter experiences. My wife has had experiences of her own. Between the two of us, we have enough recruiter experiences to know they are a complete and utter waste of time, and to never, ever deal with them.

I will now definitely read the contracts fully - from now on. Thank you.

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job-seeker in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

53 months ago

I will definitely read the contracts fully from now on. That is a ridiculous contract to make holding into a position, that you may have no control over, when you have to pay, but have no means of paying, if you have no job. When you think about it, how much time does the recruiter spend with you, and are you responsible for them finding you in over 3,000 resumes? Is that not their job, and why they get paid? Get a lawyer.

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jlkdsjflka in Avon, Ohio

30 months ago

I recently had a bad experience with Cleveland Business consultants. They kept contacting me about a job that they reached out to me for. As an ambitious new engineer, they told me that the hiring manager was happy with me during the first interview (which i was told to fly down for, Skype was not an option) and that the job was pretty much mine after graduation and moving to a new city.
Something must have happened because they set a time-frame for a second interview (after I graduated and moved) and said they would get back to me with an exact time. They never did, so i called the company, and the receptionist said that the guy working on my case was no longer with the company, which is a lie because I am connected with this man via linkedin and he has posted a job update with Cleveland Business Consultants!
Why would you give up someone's hopes like that, then just disappear on someone? I wouldn't have been so upset if this guy would have taken two seconds to say "sorry, things didn't work out" instead of deceiving me like that.

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EndlessJoy in Atlanta, Georgia

30 months ago

I realize that to make much money as a recruiter you should be a good salesperson and selling skills require much exaggeration most of the time. I just wish the recruiters would just do their selling over the phone and leave the f2f meetings alone if they really do not have anything.

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