What do you think of majoring in Broadcast Journalism? Should I be doing something more practical?

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JC in Huntington Beach, California

54 months ago

When I used the term "Weather girls" I guess I was referring to "weather girls" like this www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvkxEZUSsk8 or like this www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oe2pLL1tWII

These are broadcasters from Mexico and I doubt they studied meteorology and were hired on looks alone. Of course it's different here in the U.S

I also wouldn't mind reporting the traffic or something similar. It doesn't have to be meteorology since I'm not too strong in the sciences and I think a 4 year degree would require a lot of math. Whereas if I get my foot in the door somewhere a degree in Brodacast Meteorology might be more doable.

I didn't meant to offend anyone with my use of the term "weather girl". I know that there are many weather reporters in the U.S with advanced and even graduate degrees.

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JC in Huntington Beach, California

54 months ago

Displaced Legal Profession, if you're still here, can you tell me which one is the better major from Cal State Fullerton for this profession? Logically I would say it's a BA in Communications with a concentration in Journalism (broadcast)
communications.fullerton.edu/undergraduate/journalism.html

But I read that Elita Loresca (who is a meteorologist in a big market, Los Angeles) majored in Radio TV/Film communications.fullerton.edu/undergraduate/baradiotvfilm.html On her Wikipedia it says "Broadcast Journalism" but that's not accurate because she always does presentations at Cal State Fullerton since that is her alma mater and it always says on the Cal State website that that's her major.

You are right, I guess I am sort of looking for a "glamorous" type of career. I realize it will probably be a lot of work though.

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danielzeee in Hacienda Heights, California

52 months ago

Hi, i'm going to csuf next year as a freshman and I will be a broadcast journalism major. I want to eventually be a broadcast journalist for entertainment news, E! News being top of the Christmas tree. Also, I want to act, most likely after I get my broadcasting career started.

I know I am headed on a long, hard, strenuous road, but I am determined & will go to the lengths of the Earth to achieve my goals.

What would either of you suggest that I do as far as now while I will be getting my GE done? I have applied to write for the examiner.com and work as practically anything at broadcasting stations like FOX, ABC, NBC, ect. What would you suggest that I do to get ahead of the game and show these companies that even at a young age, I am prepared for the job?

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Guest in Dallas, Texas

51 months ago

i currently atten csuf and im a broadcast journalism major. Csuf has a great journalism program. For the major it is required to get an internship so do that. & also for a class that you get to pick for your major choose the radio production class. & volunteer at Titan TV which can be super helpful to help you with on air perfomance. & for your GE take an acting class to better shape your on air talent. & think of minoring in speech to help you with your speaking skills. Or take a public speaking class. Trust me you'll learn lots of valuable things at csuf if you want to major in broadcast journalism

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L.R. in Detroit, Michigan

47 months ago

To the original poster,

I'm also attending school and pursuing a B.A. in Journalism. I've thought about Broadcast Journalism as well. At the end of the day, it's about doing what you feel is best.

I was frightened by the instability that is generally associated with any branch of Journalism, so I initially decided to pursue a degree in the medical field. I knew I wouldn't enjoy it because I've never had any interest in the medical field, but that (or IT and Engineering) is what everyone's insisting will be stable. I find that kind of odd and wonder if there will be an over saturation of medical degree graduates and not enough positions. I know my school turns so many med students away because they simply don't have the space for them.

My point is, I'm going for it. I'm writing for my school paper and my editor also doubles as a co-host for my school's radio station, so I'm lucky enough to be around someone who knows the best of both worlds. He also worked at a local news station for 15 years.

I don't get why you have elitist people in all fields telling you things that would discourage you and trying to pass it off as fact, even if they have been in that field for some time. Again, my editor has 25 years' experience under his belt and has never once discouraged me from seeking a career in Journalism. At the end of the day, they've got to hire somebody, right? If you're qualified and show them what you have to offer, it just might be you.

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L.R. in Detroit, Michigan

47 months ago

Displaced, this is the second time that you've taken it upon yourself to address something directly to me in a thread when I'm responding to someone else's posts. I'm sorry my responses bother you so much, but they have nothing to do with you.

Actually, I'm not paying the editor to "mentor" me; he is a returning student as well, looking to obtain another degree related to the field.

Any business is competitive and tough but if you've got the tenacity to tough it out, then you can get far. There's nothing deluded about what I've said; I would rather do something I love in a field that isn't secure and that I might have to work harder to get farther in than a field that is a little more relenting and accepting and apparently the OP feels the same way, despite her hesitation.

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PRgirl in Austin, Texas

46 months ago

I was wondering the same thing. I decided to go the Public relations route because of the competitive journalism industry. I would love to be an anchor or correspondent, my dream would be GMA, but let's face it, that probably will never happen. I am willing to work hard, but journalism is not just about hard work, its sacrifice too...you sacrifice your schedule and your salary. It's a shame there is not more jobs and the pay is not good. You have to be able to earn a living, and this career is very hard to do that. My PR teacher says that her parents had to send her food rations in order to make it during her 3 years as a reporter. I go to the University of Texas, which has an awesome Journalism school. I think getting a bachelors in public relations and a master's in broadcast journalism may help and a PR degree is definitely more stable and safer. There is no way i could get a bachelor's in broadcast right now with the way the economy is. If I did, I mise well move in back with my parents. That's what my friend is doing who went to Sam Houston State U. It sucks not being able to do what you want to do, and being held back because of the industry. I love PR, but I have always wanted to be a broadcast journalist. If you have any advice for me break into broadcast journalism let me know! I would love for it to work out.

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Ex-Reporter in Jacksonville, Florida

46 months ago

TV news can be a lot of fun, but trust me it is far from glamorous. I received a BS in Telecommunications-News and worked as a reporter in a small market station after graduating. My experience was pretty typical: you shoot, edit, write, and report all of your own stories. You carry all of your gear (and if you're at a station that hasn't upgraded to those nice mini-cameras we're talking probably about 30 lbs between the camera and tripod) and sweat more than you probably ever have. After sweating all day you have to look like you have been sitting indoors all day with a hair and makeup team (which you don't have). How do you feel about working the weekends or working a night shift? Chances are you'll work one of those when you're starting out. And do you like being poor? A typical beginning reporter salary is 20,000 - 25,000 a year. Once you get into larger markets you'll make more, but that's usually years in the future. I don't tell you all of this to discourage you, just to let you know the reality of the business. It's a hard road, but if you're aware of downsides you can have a rewarding career. I left the business, but I have several friends who still remain and who still love their jobs most days.

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TVViewer in Cedar Rapids, Iowa

41 months ago

I work in the media field in Iowa - and one of our local TV personalities just wrote a book, actually, on entering the TV news field. You might want to check that out if you are interested in TV news as a career - I've read most of it.

www.lulu.com/browse/search.php?fSearchData[author]=Aaron+Shaffer&fSearchData[lang_code]=all&fSort=salesRankEver_asc&showingSubPanels=advancedSearchPanel_title_creator

It wouldn't let me post the link directly to the book in this forum but that is a link to the author's page.

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actor in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

36 months ago

If you've already had on-camera spokesperson experience - commercial acting/industrial video performance, etc; would it be necessary to go back for a 4yr radio/tv degree to work as a reporter. - Or are there shorter courses that I could take in order to get what I don't have experience-wise. I have a degree in nursing, but have done the above acting work over the years, on and off. I'm really interested in becoming a reporter - prob for a smaller market.

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Weatherman in Los Angeles, California

36 months ago

You really don't need to go that route. Being on TV is about having experience and/or the sound, look and performance on-air. For instance, many weather anchors do NOT have a degree in meteorology.

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actor in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

36 months ago

Weatherman in Los Angeles, California said: You really don't need to go that route. Being on TV is about having experience and/or the sound, look and performance on-air. For instance, many weather anchors do NOT have a degree in meteorology.

How would one go about submitting themselves for reporter work. I've never heard of this with the acting agent I had. I know sometimes there are open calls for traffic reporters w/o special training, but I've never heard of open submissions for news reporters.

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Overnights in Murrieta, California

33 months ago

If you are deciding between PR and reporting, it is possible to cross between the two careers. Both requiring strong networking, writing, and speaking ability. Take news production and build a reel. It's tough to show reporting chops to potential employers without the tape. If you need a tape and aren't in school or have access to people in the field, volunteer with your local cable access channel/city news and report for them. Sign up for J classes at a community college to get you going in the right direction.

If you want to report and have acting experience, reporting pays very little and is not the same as acting for camera. Take journalism courses, writing, law, news production. GET YOUR FOOT IN A NEWSROOM. Intern, roll prompter, edit video, whatever you need to do to get in there. Opportunity happens when you show up. Work hard, learn all you can. If you want to get on camera sooner than later, head to a smaller station where there are less fish in the small pond. Remember that small markets pay nothing. One of the more difficult pieces to the career is the schedule. Working overnight, evenings, weekends, holidays. When people are drinking their morning coffee or having dinner with the kids, you'll be at work delivering their news. There's an energy to it, but it comes at a price.

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actor in PHL in Columbus, Georgia

33 months ago

Overnights in Murrieta, California said: If you are deciding between PR and reporting, it is possible to cross between the two careers. Both requiring strong networking, writing, and speaking ability. Take news production and build a reel. It's tough to show reporting chops to potential employers without the tape. If you need a tape and aren't in school or have access to people in the field, volunteer with your local cable access channel/city news and report for them. Sign up for J classes at a community college to get you going in the right direction.

If you want to report and have acting experience, reporting pays very little and is not the same as acting for camera. Take journalism courses, writing, law, news production. GET YOUR FOOT IN A NEWSROOM. Intern, roll prompter, edit video, whatever you need to do to get in there. Opportunity happens when you show up. Work hard, learn all you can. If you want to get on camera sooner than later, head to a smaller station where there are less fish in the small pond. Remember that small markets pay nothing. One of the more difficult pieces to the career is the schedule. Working overnight, evenings, weekends, holidays. When people are drinking their morning coffee or having dinner with the kids, you'll be at work delivering their news. There's an energy to it, but it comes at a price.

Thanks!

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I Want To Be A Weather Girl in Cambridge, United Kingdom

31 months ago

Hi, I want to become a weather girl. Can someone please give me some help (i.e. a life plan?) thanks :)

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lis in Austin, Texas

30 months ago

Hello everyone, I am currently majoring in Psychology. But my problem is that I have no idea what in the world I could be doing afterwards? I know that a bachelors in psychology just isnt enough. I have to attend grad school. I wanted to be a psychologist for kids and work at a private school. But what are my job options after obtaining my bachelors degree? Could I work as a Child Psychologist assistant while I attend grad school for two more years? I am really clueless and I'm already in my Sophomore year! Also, I am very talented, good looking, speak spanish, and I have always wanted to be on camara since I was six years old. So now, I am thinking to major in broadcasting journalism!(I was also told many people with this degree end up in Public Relations) :? And get a minor is Psychology! But I really want to make sure I can have the security of a job with a good pay right after I graduate from college. I am an only child, I have practically all my family in Cuba and it's time for me to help my parents out! They have done so much for me...I am also a first time generation college student. Any advice or suggestions would be greatly appreciated! :)

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lizot in Tallahassee, Florida

20 months ago

Do not major in Broadcast Journalism. Look at the folks on TV especially cable news. Many of them are public policy or political journalism majors.

If you do go for Broadcast get a law degree or a MBA.

Majoring in the STEMs is where its at.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

20 months ago

lizot in Tallahassee, Florida said: Do not major in Broadcast Journalism. Look at the folks on TV especially cable news. Many of them are public policy or political journalism majors.

If you do go for Broadcast get a law degree or a MBA.

Majoring in the STEMs is where its at.

You don't know what you're talking about. The people you're talking about are primarily commentators. They are not trained journalists. They are on TV because they have certain degree of celebrity or fame.

An ordinary person wanting to be a radio, TV or multiplatform journalist needs to earn at least a B.A. in Radio-TV and/or Journalism, while getting as much speech training and equipment experience as possible. A JD or MBA are irrelevant to their goals, with the possible exception being Savannah Guthrie.

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sighing in southern, New Jersey

20 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: You don't know what you're talking about. The people you're talking about are primarily commentators. They are not trained journalists. They are on TV because they have certain degree of celebrity or fame.

An ordinary person wanting to be a radio, TV or multiplatform journalist needs to earn at least a B.A. in Radio-TV and/or Journalism, while getting as much speech training and equipment experience as possible. A JD or MBA are irrelevant to their goals, with the possible exception being Savannah Guthrie.

COMPLETELY agree.

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