when the job market was good

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joe in Montclair, New Jersey

19 months ago

so, I just realized, I have never experienced a good job market and I guess everyone in my generation has yet to experience a good job market. I'm 33 and I know everyone younger than me hasnt experienced a good job market. For those who been through the good times,what was it like?

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

joe in Montclair, New Jersey said: so, I just realized, I have never experienced a good job market and I guess everyone in my generation has yet to experience a good job market. I'm 33 and I know everyone younger than me hasnt experienced a good job market. For those who been through the good times,what was it like?

Here is a story that I tell. Once upon a time...I worked for a major stock market brokerage. Every year they had a Christmas Party and at the time, it was a rather lavish affair. This was in the late 80's.

At that time people smoked, drank and the entrée was always some bloody red meat. I remember one small table with non-smokers and/or vegetarians.

Every year the grand door prize was a car, second was a vacation somewhere and third was a television. This was in addition to me handing out Christmas bonuses which was based on company performance.

One year, I won the grand prize, a Datsun 300ZX. I had never won anything like this in my life!

When I tell that story today, most people don't believe me. They have never been to a real Christmas Party. The closest they have come is a Holiday "potluck".

I sound more and more like my father every day.

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Jobseeker84 in Atlanta, Georgia

19 months ago

joe in Montclair, New Jersey said: so, I just realized, I have never experienced a good job market and I guess everyone in my generation has yet to experience a good job market. I'm 33 and I know everyone younger than me hasnt experienced a good job market. For those who been through the good times,what was it like?

I guess we'll look back on these times sitting around the campfire and tell the children of the future about our time as adults as scary stories lol. "Once upon a time many moons, and stock market plunges ago..."

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Jobseeker84 in Atlanta, Georgia said: I guess we'll look back on these times sitting around the campfire and tell the children of the future about our time as adults as scary stories lol. "Once upon a time many moons, and stock market plunges ago..."

My grandmother only went to the 6th grade but she had a good job during The Great Depression. She was a cook in a mental hospital.

Now she had some scary stories. LOL!

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Calfornian in Hayward, California

19 months ago

I too experienced the pot luck transformation.

I used to work retail commissioned sales. Lots of guys at $60K/year, one guy did more than $100K. Today, those are all $8.25/hour and I bet most people don't even get 30 hours for the benefits. Well, they would be $8.25/hour if the company still existed.

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Jobseeker84 in Atlanta, Georgia

19 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: My grandmother only went to the 6th grade but she had a good job during The Great Depression. She was a cook in a mental hospital.

Now she had some scary stories. LOL!

My mama used to work with mental patients and had a few scary stories of her own... but to her it was just normal :P. I don't know why, but for some reason your comment made me think of Bette Davis in "What Ever Happened To Baby Jane?" LoL.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

19 months ago

My husband's company went from nice Christmas parties with dinner, hotel room, and going down to the water park inside the hotel, or if you're like me, I'd go sit in one of the bars instead and watch the bartenders doing their juggling thing with bottles. Fancy schmancy.

Now there are no Christmas parties. Forget the bonus. Forget the free ice cream and pizza whenever you want to take some home (he works for an ice cream/frozen pizza company). Forget raises, too. The only thing you're getting now is a kick in the pants.

You won't see the good old days for a long time.

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin said: My husband's company went from nice Christmas parties with dinner, hotel room, and going down to the water park inside the hotel, or if you're like me, I'd go sit in one of the bars instead and watch the bartenders doing their juggling thing with bottles. Fancy schmancy.

Now there are no Christmas parties. Forget the bonus. Forget the free ice cream and pizza whenever you want to take some home (he works for an ice cream/frozen pizza company). Forget raises, too. The only thing you're getting now is a kick in the pants.

You won't see the good old days for a long time.

Ancient History now. Today, they say, "You're lucky to have a job. Oh and Merry Christmas".

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

19 months ago

No, there is no Merry Christmas. It's only Happy Holidays. LOL

Could you at least buy me a can of soda for Christmas? No? Then maybe a cup of water and a few ketchup packets from Wendy's will do.

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Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania

19 months ago

^

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Nick in Linden, New Jersey

19 months ago

I worked for Lowe's, back just a few years ago when most of the "sales specialists" made unlimited commissions. Sure, it was usually only 1-2% of the sale, but it was unlimited and I sold a lot. I ended up making around $62K a year, for three years.

I think two years ago now, they got rid of all commissions. They try to find good reasons to get rid of the higher paid employees, the ones who are actually making good money. The people who replace them, are lucky if they make $15/hr...most are around $12.

I love the "you're lucky to have a job" line. Yes, I'm very lucky to be underpaid, overworked, got home at 4 AM this morning from inventory, spend about a week's worth of pay just for the gas to get to work. But I have insurance, so I guess at least if I break my foot, the answer won't be to put me down as a lame horse. That's something, right?

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Nick in Linden, New Jersey said: I love the "you're lucky to have a job" line. Yes, I'm very lucky to be underpaid, overworked, got home at 4 AM this morning from inventory, spend about a week's worth of pay just for the gas to get to work. But I have insurance, so I guess at least if I break my foot, the answer won't be to put me down as a lame horse. That's something, right?
.

LOL! I like it too. They should just repeal The 13th Amendment which abolished slavery and be done with it.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

19 months ago

The "you're lucky to have a job" line or the "at least you have a job." My husband gets that one all the time when he's working every weekend and most holidays. When he's busy doing the type of job a college kid does stocking shelves in a grocery store. Merchandiser or stock boy, what's the difference other than a few more dollars an hour?

Then again, cleaning toilets is a job. Doesn't mean a person wants to do it. That's the answer he always give the "at least you have a job" crowd.

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jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland

19 months ago

Two things happened.

First,ideologically, a certain kind of "This is a Dog eat Dog World" poison was injected into the air and was circulating since. The poison has very concrete name: Ayn Rand. Read what this half-witten woman wrote and how everyone bought into her ideas (even literally, with her 'Atlas Shrugged' was Amazon top-seller in early 2009).
Took some 50 years to materialize her fantasies but you can pretty much see now what her ideas lead to.

Second, in practical terms,the companies used to function based on a long term goal of productivity. It was (very properly so) reasoned that you can't kick and abuse your dog and horse all day long then expect both to serve you in the need. It would take a psychopath to treat employees back then the way they are treated today.
It was understood that workers must be motivated to do a great job (hence prizes, bonuses and vacations) and company performance was dependent on those workers and their performance.

It is no longer the case in our times. Now, there are stock holders who demand higher value and CEO's who will do whatever to get that stock value high.
Getting stock values in short term don't require any of the things you would do if you considered the business viability in the long term. Instead of innovation and increase of productivity, the short route to greater profit is to cut costs. Since you can't fully eliminate a cost and have Perpetuum Mobile, something must give. Employees are easiest sacrifice , in this regard, so you have a) massive lay-offs with resulting lowering of wages and b) overburdened emloyee who is encouraged to be treated like a scum ( I am sure there exists some book/research paper written by some PhD , with multiple charts and algorithmic formulas which tries to prove a theory that the corporation with the worst treated employees is the most profitable out there).

To bring back good times the "Dog eat Dog" principle will have to be discarded and the return to (TBC)

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jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland

19 months ago

To bring back the good times the "Dog eat dog" principle will have to be discarded, and the return to more reasonable work ethics and company policies will need to be restored.

But this is not to happen until the behemoths who made Bible of Ayn Rands' books see their businesses in ruins, as a result of the massive stock market crash (which, make no mistake about it, is coming).

There is nothing we can do to make any changes because these behemoths are simply too big and powerful and no one individual or group of individuals can challenge the existing culture of "k.ill the dog feed the wolf" craze.
It will be taken care of in time (as these actions will lead to massive economic crash and complete extinction of companies who practice this philosophy, with the exception of few who will survive it).

To those who ask how it was back in the years: It was anything like a Third World country.
Now it is just like what it always was like in I.ndia, C.hina or B.angladesh.

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Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania

19 months ago

joe in Montclair, New Jersey said: so, I just realized, I have never experienced a good job market and I guess everyone in my generation has yet to experience a good job market. I'm 33 and I know everyone younger than me hasnt experienced a good job market. For those who been through the good times,what was it like?

Joe, it's bittersweet looking back. I think the reason a lot of us in my generation (I am 50+) were slow to catch on to the new game is because we were taught WE had the power to make or break ourselves. This is my memory of the 1980's and 1990's when I was in my youth;

*Ads were plentiful in the local papers, even if it wasn't the perfect job.
*You could walk into most establishments with a resume in hand and get an interview and possible hire, all in the same day!
*Benefits were standard with full time jobs, sometimes the company even picking up the entire cost of health insurance.
*You did NOT need a college education to make 30K, even then.
*Hard work and reliability were noted and often propelled you to a promotion.
*Temp agencies were much less commonplace, but were an excellent tool to get one's foot in the door to a major company.
*Most hirings did not require multiple interviews, nor did they take weeks to happen.
*You were encouraged to follow-up on interviews and it was seen as a sign that you were interested.
*It was expected that you would negotiate a fair salary once you were hired.
*Applications were simple and non invasive.

I am certain there are more I could think of here. I won't tell you that bosses were nicer or that there wasn't great pressure to perform. But good jobs were much more plentiful and most people had access to them.

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Jeff in Mount Rainier, Maryland

19 months ago

jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland said: Now, there are stock holders who demand higher value and CEO's who will do whatever to get that stock value high.
Getting stock values in short term don't require any of the things you would do if you considered the business viability in the long term. Instead of innovation and increase of productivity, the short route to greater profit is to cut costs. Since you can't fully eliminate a cost and have Perpetuum Mobile, something must give. Employees are easiest sacrifice , in this regard, so you have a) massive lay-offs with resulting lowering of wages and b) overburdened emloyee

With a large portion of the CEO's compensation coming from stock options, the CEO has a large incentive to do ANYTHING that he/she can to raise the stock price in the short term. CEO's aren't just acting in the interests of the stock holders, they're acting in their own interests.

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Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania

19 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: Here is a story that I tell. Once upon a time...I worked for a major stock market brokerage. Every year they had a Christmas Party and at the time, it was a rather lavish affair. This was in the late 80's.

At that time people smoked, drank and the entrée was always some bloody red meat. I remember one small table with non-smokers and/or vegetarians.

Every year the grand door prize was a car, second was a vacation somewhere and third was a television. This was in addition to me handing out Christmas bonuses which was based on company performance.

One year, I won the grand prize, a Datsun 300ZX. I had never won anything like this in my life!

When I tell that story today, most people don't believe me. They have never been to a real Christmas Party. The closest they have come is a Holiday "potluck".

I sound more and more like my father every day.

Yes!! The lavish Christmas party. I do remember those!

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jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland

19 months ago

"..it was anything but like a Third World country" (sorry, another typo, among many others).

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jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland

19 months ago

Jeff in Mount Rainier, Maryland said: With a large portion of the CEO's compensation coming from stock options, the CEO has a large incentive to do ANYTHING that he/she can to raise the stock price in the short term. CEO's aren't just acting in the interests of the stock holders, they're acting in their own interests.

I know that. That's why I said it will not work in the long term.
But it's all part of Randism (in terms of what is happening). I suggest you take time and read more of her books and interviews.

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania said: Joe, it's bittersweet looking back. I think the reason a lot of us in my generation (I am 50+) were slow to catch on to the new game is because we were taught WE had the power to make or break ourselves. This is my memory of the 1980's and 1990's when I was in my youth;

*Ads were plentiful in the local papers, even if it wasn't the perfect job.
*You could walk into most establishments with a resume in hand and get an interview and possible hire, all in the same day!
*Benefits were standard with full time jobs, sometimes the company even picking up the entire cost of health insurance.
*You did NOT need a college education to make 30K, even then.
*Hard work and reliability were noted and often propelled you to a promotion.
*Temp agencies were much less commonplace, but were an excellent tool to get one's foot in the door to a major company.
*Most hirings did not require multiple interviews, nor did they take weeks to happen.
*You were encouraged to follow-up on interviews and it was seen as a sign that you were interested.
*It was expected that you would negotiate a fair salary once you were hired.
*Applications were simple and non invasive.

I am certain there are more I could think of here. I won't tell you that bosses were nicer or that there wasn't great pressure to perform. But good jobs were much more plentiful and most people had access to them.

I wonder if that is now our version of our parent's "When I was a kid, I walked to school, ten miles in the snow, uphill both ways" story.

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Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania

19 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: I wonder if that is now our version of our parent's "When I was a kid, I walked to school, ten miles in the snow, uphill both ways" story.

I know!!! I laugh at myself with some of these. Just remember Blue, a lot of this was still in play just a decade ago.

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Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania

19 months ago

joe in Montclair, New Jersey said: so, I just realized, I have never experienced a good job market and I guess everyone in my generation has yet to experience a good job market. I'm 33 and I know everyone younger than me hasnt experienced a good job market. For those who been through the good times,what was it like?

BTW Joe...I don't envy what you must be seeing. I thought initially that I couldn't get anywhere anymore because I was no longer 30, but now I know this economy is hurting everyone. I do hope you get to see things improve. Having hope is a good thing.

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania said: Yes!! The lavish Christmas party. I do remember those!

One of my favorite TV shows is Downton Abbey, which is nothing more than an elaborate soap opera. However, the backdrop to the story is real and is about an England in transition.

Following WWI, England was broke and the tax rate went from 10% to 90%. It was almost impossible for the landed gentry to maintain those lavish estates anymore. Add to this that the country moved from a monarchy to a socialist system and that virtually ended the notion of domestic service.

However, as we continue to carve out the middle class, we may see a return to a similar system. My mother use to say, "We need rich people. Otherwise, who would poor people work for?" That mindset may once again become in vogue.

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania said: I know!!! I laugh at myself with some of these. Just remember Blue, a lot of this was still in play just a decade ago.

I remember year ago, my brother telling my father that we wanted to become an astronaut.

"An astronaut?" said my father. "Get a job ya bum! F**king astronaut".

I use to tell Joe that. LOL!

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Calfornian in Hayward, California

19 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: I wonder if that is now our version of our parent's "When I was a kid, I walked to school, ten miles in the snow, uphill both ways" story.

One of the tech forums I'm on has a lot of that. They're all older guys, many 60's and 70's, They hate the new breed of tech because they don't respect their elders.

"Did you?"

They always have a defense but I doubt they'd have been any different if they were 25 today.

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jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland

19 months ago

And come to think of it, Randism is just a flip side of Bolshevism. It is the same Marxist concept of class warfare,it's like a cancer where one group of cells multiply by destroying others with ultimate end being the demise of entire body.

The way she got them is by telling them that anything short of starving to death and abusing your subordinates is a sacrifice of your fortune in service of less deserving.

So, in case you don't kick the s*it out of your dog and don't starve your horse to death, you are making a huge sacrifice (by properly feeding and treating them), which you really shouldn't if you Objectively do what is in your self-interests.
That's Randism in a nutshell.

And you thought it was Obama? HAHA !!! lol

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Calfornian in Hayward, California said: One of the tech forums I'm on has a lot of that. They're all older guys, many 60's and 70's, They hate the new breed of tech because they don't respect their elders.

"Did you?"

They always have a defense but I doubt they'd have been any different if they were 25 today.

Having been a hiring manager myself, any manager today who gives the "You need to pay your dues" lecture to a GEN Y, will in short order, end up talking to an empty chair. I have seen it happen.

I would never ask a candidate "Where do you see yourself in five years?". Nor would I ever utter the phrase "Aren't we a team?" That is as out-of-date as my wardrobe.

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland said: And come to think of it, Randism is just a flip side of Bolshevism. It is the same Marxist concept of class warfare,it's like a cancer where one group of cells multiply by destroying others with ultimate end being the demise of entire body.

The way she got them is by telling them that anything short of starving to death and abusing your subordinates is a sacrifice of your fortune in service of less deserving.

So, in case you don't kick the s*it out of your dog and don't starve your horse to death, you are making a huge sacrifice (by properly feeding and treating them), which you really shouldn't if you Objectively do what is in your self-interests.
That's Randism in a nutshell.

And you thought it was Obama? HAHA !!! lol

Its called Objectivism. Ayn Rand if often used in Comparative Economics classes to highlight some of the advantages/disadvantages of Capitalism. At least, it was when I went to school.

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Calfornian in Hayward, California said: One of the tech forums I'm on has a lot of that. They're all older guys, many 60's and 70's, They hate the new breed of tech because they don't respect their elders.

"Did you?"

They always have a defense but I doubt they'd have been any different if they were 25 today.

You will appreciate this story. There is a used book store near me that gives me credit for my old books in exchange for other used books.

There are a few genres that he will not take, notably: 1. Computer books and 2. Management style books.

He will not give me a dime for Windows Millennium or Continuous Improvement. He says, throw them out. LOL!

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jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland

19 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: Its called Objectivism. Ayn Rand if often used in Comparative Economics classes to highlight some of the advantages/disadvantages of Capitalism. At least, it was when I went to school.

A lot of it is not a proper education.

If you want to understand Capitalism you don't read a Bolshevik country emigre turned McCarthy witness and a popular writer.
Nor would I trust any textbook that referred to her ideas as an example of "pure Capitalism".

If you want to understand the principles of laissez faire you read Adam Smith.
If you want to understand Capitalism in historical perspective, how it came to be, what it represented and why it was successful, you may want to read Max Webers "Spirit of Capitalism".

Your education may have consisted of just being programmed to repeat what you heard in a classroom or got from the textbook ,without filtering it through the prism of critical thinking , but books are still available and you could still do your own study and analysis.

Good luck.

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jobseeker in Bethesda, Maryland

19 months ago

Just for LOL's:

"In 1976 she (Ayn Rand) retired from writing her newsletter and, despite her initial objections, was persuaded to allow Evva Pryor, a consultant from her attorney's office, to sign her up for Social Security and Medicare"
~McConnell, Scott (2010). 100 Voices: An Oral History of Ayn Rand. New York: New American Library. ISBN 9 7 8-0-4 5 1-2 3 1 3 0-7pp. 5 2 0–5 2 1

Most hilarious thing about the hypocrites who express so much hatred for safety-net is that very often (if you do some digging) you find them to be very beneficiaries of the things they spent a lifetime criticizing.
Nothing against anyone on Medicare or Social Security, but what a monstrous hypocritical creature you must be to crusade against something all your life only to become its' beneficiary at the end.
If she was consistent and true to her views she should have never signed up for those programs.

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catfish503 in portland, Oregon

19 months ago

I not only remember the lavish Christmas parties, but I worked at one of the big 8 accounting firms, now it's the big 4 and they had a golf day every year on a Friday, all expenses paid. If you didn't want to go to golf day then you had to work. You could rent a cart, golf 9 or 18 holes, breakfast, lunch, snacks and beer paid for. There were prizes for the golf tournament. The accountants let loose on that day...it was pretty crazy. I remember seeing golf carts racing through the course, 5 or 6 people hanging out of the cart laughing, most likely intoxicated, but everyone was having fun... =)

At my last job they had a pot luck in the tiny lunch room during your hour break =\

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Calfornian in Hayward, California

19 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: There are a few genres that he will not take, notably: 1. Computer books and 2. Management style books.

The right IT books sell really well in the amazon trade-in program. They love the hot stuff and even some older stuff like SAS but I doubt my old NT books would be on their buy list.

I just spent some time looking at the management books on Amazon. The field is like masturbation without the finish. What a bunch of junk.

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Calfornian in Hayward, California said: The right IT books sell really well in the amazon trade-in program. They love the hot stuff and even some older stuff like SAS but I doubt my old NT books would be on their buy list.

I just spent some time looking at the management books on Amazon. The field is like masturbation without the finish. What a bunch of junk.

Management styles are as faddish as programming languages. Every few years, you have to learn a new way to add 2 and 2 together.

There are one or two other genres that he won't take. One is textbooks and I can't remember the others.

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Calfornian in Hayward, California said: The right IT books sell really well in the amazon trade-in program. They love the hot stuff and even some older stuff like SAS but I doubt my old NT books would be on their buy list.

I just spent some time looking at the management books on Amazon. The field is like masturbation without the finish. What a bunch of junk.

Management is a lot like masturbation. You are really only f**king yourself. LOL!

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

19 months ago

joe in Montclair, New Jersey said: so, I just realized, I have never experienced a good job market and I guess everyone in my generation has yet to experience a good job market. I'm 33 and I know everyone younger than me hasnt experienced a good job market. For those who been through the good times,what was it like?

I'm not much older than you, 36 to be exact, so I'm a little unsure how you've never really experienced a good job market.

The job market was good prior to the onset of The Great Recession in the summer of 2007. (You would've been 26, maybe 27 then, and haven't been out of college for too long.) I can, like Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania, remember when:

-Job ads were plentiful
-You could walk into most employers with a résumé in hand and get an interview and, quite possibly, be hired on the spot
-You didn't need a college degree to earn 10K a year or more (you won't believe just how many job ads for full-time and part-time office workers, even mail clerks, require a college degree... if not a 4-year, a 2-year)
-There were more full-time opportunities and less temporary and part-time opportunities
-Applications were much more simple and non-invasive
-Hiring managers didn't ask questions they shouldn't be asking, i.e. illegal questions and ones that have nothing to do with your ability to do the job
-Most hirings didn't take multiple interviews nor take weeks to occur (that is, job offers came quicker and usually after one interview)
-There was no such thing as group or open interviews
-There was no such thing as working interviews or trial runs before deciding to hire you (that is, you were just hired... if it worked out, great and if it didn't, they'd just get rid of you and hire someone else)

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

19 months ago

-I didn't have to compete with 100-200 other job seekers
-You were encouraged to follow-up and even send thank you notes or cards
-They didn't make you go through all the hoops they make you go through today just to work a part-time job (it's crazy of what's asked of job seekers just to even work 2-5 hours a day once or twice a week even)

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois said: -I didn't have to compete with 100-200 other job seekers
-You were encouraged to follow-up and even send thank you notes or cards
-They didn't make you go through all the hoops they make you go through today just to work a part-time job (it's crazy of what's asked of job seekers just to even work 2-5 hours a day once or twice a week even)

-You could walk into most employers with a résumé in hand and get an interview and, quite possibly, be hired on the spot

My sister says that they had an opening for a part-time evening receptionist with benefits with the school district. Very rare.

They had over 1,000 apps!

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

19 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: My sister says that they had an opening for a part-time evening receptionist with benefits with the school district. Very rare.

They had over 1,000 apps!

I can believe that. One thing that has remained pretty consistent with people who've interviewed me over the past year or two is the number of applicants applying for each job posted. I've had many practitioners and managers tell me they've had anywhere from 100-200 applicants. I even had one tell me he had just over 200 applicants. It's crazy.

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Calfornian in Hayward, California

19 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: They had over 1,000 apps!

A 1000 apps does not equal a 1000 viable candidates.

But it does make it a lot harder to stand out.

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still retired in Texas

19 months ago

designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin said: No, there is no Merry Christmas. It's only Happy Holidays. LOL

Could you at least buy me a can of soda for Christmas? No? Then maybe a cup of water and a few ketchup packets from Wendy's will do.

Lol..the oddest thing my husband walked in with for Christmas was a bottle of bubble bath. I was like what? He said ALL the guys got one..lol. all i could hear in my head was the grinch saying "there goes christmas."

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Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois

19 months ago

Calfornian in Hayward, California said: A 1000 apps does not equal a 1000 viable candidates.

But it does make it a lot harder to stand out.

It's definitely much harder to stand out nowadays.

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Calfornian in Hayward, California said: A 1000 apps does not equal a 1000 viable candidates.

But it does make it a lot harder to stand out.

Even if only 20 applicants are "viable", there is still only ONE job.

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Elizabeth in North Chicago, Illinois said: It's definitely much harder to stand out nowadays.

That is the problem with popular job sites. While it may be easy to just click submit, the competition is tremendous.

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Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania

19 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: That is the problem with popular job sites. While it may be easy to just click submit, the competition is tremendous.

That's why I have now stooped to CL. I DO get interviews, but obviously, I am still unemployed. The jobs on CL are mostly local, small businesses. I feel like it's my only chance. I have another interview this Wednesday after last weeks. Two different companies. I am no where near celebrating.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

19 months ago

I miss the feeling of education and skills being equated to higher employment, money and security. I feel like I am always looking in the window.

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida said: I miss the feeling of education and skills being equated to higher employment, money and security. I feel like I am always looking in the window.

The notion that education and personal initiative can pull you out of the dung heap is a long and enduring one and not to say that this doesn't happen but the reality is that this doesn't happen nearly enough to count on.

The truth is that you are much more likely to have money and opportunity, if you are simply born into it.

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Joe Gagill in Poughkeepsie, New York

19 months ago

Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania said: That's why I have now stooped to CL. I DO get interviews, but obviously, I am still unemployed. The jobs on CL are mostly local, small businesses. I feel like it's my only chance. I have another interview this Wednesday after last weeks. Two different companies. I am no where near celebrating.

Yea, I like CL too. With CL everyday you have this feeling that there will be some job to apply to. Never with Monster, SH, CB, Dept of Labor, etc

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Riot in Massachusetts

19 months ago

I think that education and skills can still correlate closely with increase opportunity, but that, on the whole, we have to be willing to be more entrepreneurial. We have to assume less that an education will lead to a position at a company and instead interpret that ideal as that an education can give the skills to create your own job. (We may need to supplement our field-specific education with self-study in personal finance, marketing, etc.)

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