Anyone else tired of rude employers during interviews?

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Chain in Eugene, Oregon

66 months ago

Yes. Had to deal with one who basically called me an unethical scumbag because I thought that working on commission and serving the customer didn't go hand in hand. Oddly enough, the job didn't have anything to do with sales, which is why I wanted it.

Hiring managers are on a power trip, and I doubt anything short of violence will wipe out their snotty attitude. Makes the three hot meals and the free education in prison that much more attractive.

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sexysteelerfan in Mcdonough, Georgia

61 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Employers don't want to hear it. They don't want to hear that a candidate has been seriously ill, even if candidate has been given a clean bill of health. In their minds, candidate is likely to be ill again and will miss time. Also, employers are concerned about the impact on their healthcare premiums.

Also, illness stories come across to employers as sob stories and tales of woe. They only want to hear positives.

Displaced, I have to disagree with you here. So, what was that courageous woman supposed to do when the interviewer asked her to explain "recent gaps in employment"? Just curious....

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Jayden T in Alabama

61 months ago

A lot of employers don't care about people and that is the bottom line. But I would hate to be on the receiving end of "Karma" after I had treated someone else rudely.

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Jayden T in Alabama

61 months ago

LT in Newark, New Jersey said: The woman conducting my interview today was so rude and unprofessional. When she came to get me she called me by the wrong name. Her tone when asking questions was harsh and she made several nasty comments after I answered questions. I have over 14 years experience in the field I am interviewing for so I am not taking this personally because she was rude right from the beginning. I am just tired of dealing with unprofessional interviewers. There is no reason to ever treat someone badly. I would never work at this company. I have been interviewing for several months now and I am really turned off. Anyone else feel this way? Thanks

No you are not the only one that feels this way. Unfortunately employers are not held accountable for their snotty pissy attitudes. I sure wish they were though. But as I said in my previous post Karma has a way of making it's comeback to wrongdoing.

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Jayden T in Alabama

61 months ago

Something must have been going pretty badly with her for a customer to want to meet with the President.

But in any event, Karma caught up with her. I wonder how she feels now that she is on the other side of the desk.

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BurnedoutRN in Atlanta, Georgia

61 months ago

I went through one particulary nasty interview several years back, in which it was blatantly obvious from the moment I walked through the door they didn't want me. At one point, the Manager who was interviewing me had the gall to ask, irritated: "Why are you here,
anyway?"

"Because you ASKED me to come", I answered calmly and in my best professional tone....which is more than could ever be said for her.

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BurnedoutRN in Atlanta, Georgia

61 months ago

No, they don't. Maybe it's because THEY are unhappy with their own situation. Regardless of the reason, there is NO excuse for anyone to be rude to a candidate. I wouldn't want to work for ANY organization whose hiring staff not only makes us feel unwelcome (and uninvited) during the interview, but also does not follow through on their own
promises.

Speaking of candidates, I (finally!) have a job interview today. Keep your fingers crossed!

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BurnedoutRN in Atlanta, Georgia

61 months ago

freedom88 in Georgia said: There is no excuse whatsoever. Everyone started somewhere and that includes those that are in a position to interview. There is no need to be so rude. There are consequences to every action and so I hope that is kept in mind.

I hope you get the job BurnedOutRN! Let us know!

Thanks, I will!

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fedup in Farmington, Michigan

61 months ago

I am tired of interviewers who have had someone (like my daughter) drive 800 miles for an interview and then only give them a half hour because they are looking for someone with supervisory experience. Like her resume and the fact that she JUST got her degree didn't tip you off~

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vicque fassinger in Cleveland, Ohio

61 months ago

The second discussion I wanted to contribute to is regarding the frustation many interviewees feel about going on an interview to be either interviewed by someone rude or to find out they weren't qualified, etc.

If you can look at every interview as an opportunity (that someone else may not have gotten) to learn something and to practice your interviewing skills, then maybe that will help to keep you motivated, optimistic, and in a good frame of mind. As I have written about before, some people wait until they get that interview for that ideal job. They passed up a handful of other interviewing opportunities because they knew they didn't want the job, and then they arrive at the interview they do want (but blow it for any number of reasons) but don't do well because their interviewing skills haven't been practiced enough.

If you don't have plans to do something else anyway, and if you have gas in your car, go on those interviews you don't really think you want to PRACTICE - to become more confident, to get experience being asked questions.

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greatminds in Savannah, Georgia

61 months ago

Often times it is the employer and not the potential employee that has the wrong attitude. I know they make the rules, however that is still no excuse to be hateful. This happening a lot more than what is being told. No one has the right, not even employers, to be rude to anyone. Respect is a two way street and the rudeness gives you insight as to how that employer is possibly treating their employees and I certainly wouldn't want to work with such nasty disrespectful people.

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vicque fassinger in Cleveland, Ohio

61 months ago

In addition to being interviewed by a rude representative from a company, another "flag" that will tell you not to work for the company is the number of times you see the position available in the paper or on-line. If, every few months (or weeks!), you keep seeing the same position posted - that is a warning sign something is amiss! It may be a sign that they can't keep someone in that position for very long. And, of course, the question is, why not? Is the work not worth the pay? Is the corporate culture too impossible to deal with? Is the environment unsafe or unhealthy (mentally or physically)?

A great question to ask when going on a job interview is, "Is this a newly-created position or would I be replacing someone?" If you are replacing someone, ask where the person is currently that used to have that job. If the answer is they got promoted - great! if the answer is they moved on to another company - possible red flag!

Another question to ask is "How long was the person in the role?" If the response is, "We've had a handful of people in this job throughout the past year!" - Again, a red flag!

Remember - you are interviewing them too - you are going on these interviews to see if you want to spend 40+ hours of your week there - you are not just going on the interview with hopes they'll like you and offer you a job. Many times, a person is offered a job, he/she takes it, and knows down deep inside it is not where they are meant to be. (Hence, a person quits and the job becomes available again.)

Which is a reason I always tell my clients to go ahead and respond to a posting or opening that is no longer available!

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jojaje in Hartford, Connecticut

61 months ago

Good advice, thanks!
Laid off due to recession.
Job searching for a year now. Twelve years of experience.
It's brutal out here.

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BurnedoutRN in Atlanta, Georgia

61 months ago

freedom88 in Georgia said: I hope you get the job BurnedOutRN! Let us know!

The first interview went well. I wish I could say the same thing for the second interview, which was completed yesterday and lasted barely ten minutes. While I don't believe the interviewer was rude, I clearly got the feeling that I was being weeded out.

Now I know how Demetrius felt, when Caligula sicced his tigers on him...

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BurnedoutRN in Atlanta, Georgia

61 months ago

My suspicions were not unfounded. I found out yesterday that they hired someone else.

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BurnedoutRN in Atlanta, Georgia

61 months ago

Mary,
If I could move to Florida I would, but I can't.

Besides the fact that I don't have the money to relocate to another state, both of my parents are deceased. Also, I am living with two of my immediate family members. We co-exist on what little income they draw from social security and my UI benefits. The third lives close by. Until (and IF) my financial situation ever improves, I am going to have to stay right where I am.

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Jatty in Indianapolis, Indiana

60 months ago

vicque fassinger in Cleveland, Ohio said: I'd like to offer some comments to two of the postings here.

Regarding the discussion of someone who was ill and wanted to explain her gap in employment to the interviewer. While I advocate honesty on a resume and even in an interview, I don't necessarily believer that in every circumstance - at all times - the "interviewee" needs to (or should) share every piece of personal info. Another way to deal handle the question of the gap is to be a) proactive and NOT put a gap (a flag) on a resume to begin with by putting the four digit years instead of months and years on a resume, or by putting the number of years instead of the four digit years. I can't imagine a interviewer taking the time or interest to then ask you the exact months of when you worked there - so that might help to avoid the whole issue of the gap from the get-go. Another way is to say, "I've been exploring my options and interviewing to find just the right company for me where I can continue to grow as an individual while utilizing my diverse skills to contribute to its success."

Sort of a necro to reply to your post a month later but I had a funny/ugly situation once where I didn't put the months on the resume. They asked what month I start there, I said I wasn't sure. Then the dialog went something like this.

Well was it Winter?
I don't think so...
Was it January?
mmm probably not, that's near winter
Was it February?

I swear they went through about 4 months then finally I just chose one because it was getting pretty uncomfortable knowing they were willing to go all the way to December and stand their ground that I needed to come up with some month, so yeah, I posted this because it fits into both, rude interviewers and a time when months worked against me.
Needless to say, I didn't get that job but hey, it was many years ago.

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Are You Serious in Denver, Colorado

60 months ago

greatminds in Savannah, Georgia said: Another inexcusable action by employers. Manners and common courtesy on their part have gone by the wayside and that is only getting worse. But of course they always like to lay blame on the employee instead of taking responsibility for their own rude actions.

Bad manners and rudeness from employers and people in general has definitely inspired me to use good manners, common sense and treat others well, especially since those things seem so rare now days. Employers and others with bad manners, are definitely leaving an impression in a few short minutes with people, but I guarantee it's NOT exactly, a very favorable one.

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Are You Serious in Denver, Colorado

60 months ago

jojaje in Hartford, Connecticut said: Good advice, thanks!
Laid off due to recession.
Job searching for a year now. Twelve years of experience.
It's brutal out here.

For me it's going into the 3rd year, if you can believe it! And I'm just seeking a very standard entry level job.

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Are You Serious in Denver, Colorado

60 months ago

vicque fassinger in Cleveland, Ohio said: In addition to being interviewed by a rude representative from a company, another "flag" that will tell you not to work for the company is the number of times you see the position available in the paper or on-line. If, every few months (or weeks!), you keep seeing the same position posted - that is a warning sign something is amiss! It may be a sign that they can't keep someone in that position for very long. And, of course, the question is, why not? Is the work not worth the pay? Is the corporate culture too impossible to deal with? Is the environment unsafe or unhealthy (mentally or physically)?

A great question to ask when going on a job interview is, "Is this a newly-created position or would I be replacing someone?" If you are replacing someone, ask where the person is currently that used to have that job. If the answer is they got promoted - great! if the answer is they moved on to another company - possible red flag!

Another question to ask is "How long was the person in the role?" If the response is, "We've had a handful of people in this job throughout the past year!" - Again, a red flag!

Remember - you are interviewing them too - you are going on these interviews to see if you want to spend 40+ hours of your week there - you are not just going on the interview with hopes they'll like you and offer you a job. Many times, a person is offered a job, he/she takes it, and knows down deep inside it is not where they are meant to be. (Hence, a person quits and the job becomes available again.)

Which is a reason I always tell my clients to go ahead and respond to a posting or opening that is no longer available!

I agree with you when you say it's a red flag when companies advertise themselves numerous times as hiring.

Your accurate though, smart job seekers are like, "What is this company doing to it's employees? How many run in's with the department of unemployment/labor?"

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Erin Myers in Reseda, California

59 months ago

vicque fassinger in Cleveland, Ohio said: In addition to being interviewed by a rude representative from a company, another "flag" that will tell you not to work for the company is the number of times you see the position available in the paper or on-line. If, every few months (or weeks!), you keep seeing the same position posted - that is a warning sign something is amiss! It may be a sign that they can't keep someone in that position for very long. And, of course, the question is, why not? Is the work not worth the pay? Is the corporate culture too impossible to deal with? Is the environment unsafe or unhealthy (mentally or physically)?

Another question to ask is "How long was the person in the role?" If the response is, "We've had a handful of people in this job throughout the past year!" - Again, a red flag

Which is a reason I always tell my clients to go ahead and respond to a posting or opening that is no longer available!

Sooo true; I have seen this, and experienced this personally, several times, in the last 10 years: One side was me twice taking a Job as Manager at 2 Stores that hadn't had a Manager for 6-8 months. Both of those Jobs ended up horrifically. Another, me being "hired on the spot" at Jobs, taking them because I needed $, and having those end up horrifically as well...bad Culture, Bad Boss, impossible work environment, etc.

I have a VERY firm set of Rules now:

1. I will not "take over" a Store that hasn't had a Manager for longer than 1-2 months, even if it costs me the Job;
2. I will always ask what the turnover is at a Store/Company before accepting an Offer;
3. If I hear ANY bashing of the former Manager I'd be replacing, ANY comments about how "several ppl have quit here" etc. I will turn down the Job.

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ramblingman12 in Longwood, Florida

59 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: They're rude and coldhearted because they can be. It's that simple.

Yup, kharma sucks though, so can't wait till they are on the other side of the table!

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Erin Myers in Reseda, California

59 months ago

ramblingman12 in Longwood, Florida said: Yup, kharma sucks though, so can't wait till they are on the other side of the table!

Someday, the tide will turn; maybe they will be out of a Job too someday and have to struggle. Lord help me if I run acrost anyone who treated me badly on the "Other side of the table" someday down the line...I WILL remember!

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searching in Des Plaines, Illinois

59 months ago

sexysteelerfan in Mcdonough, Georgia said: Displaced, I have to disagree with you here. So, what was that courageous woman supposed to do when the interviewer asked her to explain "recent gaps in employment"? Just curious....

Having been in this situation, I simply explained that I needed time off to take care of a family member battling cancer. They don't have to know that the family member is you, and it's technically not a lie. For some reason people are more sympathetic and understanding of a caretaker than the actual person who is ill. It may come down to the assumption that their insurance premiums go up.

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searching in Des Plaines, Illinois

59 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Technically, no. It is not a lie. But your explanation could, and, I emphasize, could, come back to haunt you if the insurance company ever views your medical records.

HIPAA laws prevent insurance companies from revealing medical records to an employer.

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bushraehsan in Glastonbury, Connecticut

59 months ago

Interviews are always precious but they are especially very precious in this economy. I was happy that I finally got an interview since its been downhill since I graduated in May 2009. The recruiter sends me the wrong address. I had to take a ride as I dont own a car as yet (can not afford it). We make calls to find out the real location and we find out that the conveniently missed out on a number in the address.

The guy makes jokes about me finding my way out of the office. Very rude especially because it was not even my mistake and I told him that the error was in the email.

I hope the recruiters get better out there but I think the downside of this economy has given them the edge to do this and I think they know it and some of them use it to their advantage.

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Jim K in Middleton, Wisconsin

58 months ago

Are You Serious in Denver, Colorado said: For me it's going into the 3rd year, if you can believe it! And I'm just seeking a very standard entry level job.

5 years here. Now on Badgercare, state health insurance. Did a bit of labor work a few years ago but nothing panned out. getting by on helping out family business. got a college degree but Now they're asking for masters degrees for entry level jobs???

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

58 months ago

Jim K in Middleton, Wisconsin said: got a college degree but Now they're asking for masters degrees for entry level jobs???

They're also asking that you sing, dance and do magic tricks. Standing on your head and being able to ride a unicycle is a plus. All for $8 an hour.

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Lyn

58 months ago

Designer Bee I didnt know we applied for the same jobs!

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

58 months ago

Not only are they not hiring for the nitpicky reasons, they are laying off for any little offense. If not they make something up if they don't like you.

I really think they need to look at how the hiring person treats applicants. The person hiring needs to make a good impression. They are representing the company. Even if it is only a test of how the applicant will react, how is the applicant to know? All they see is a company they don't want to work for, because it will only get worse when hired.

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Little miss sunshine in London, United Kingdom

58 months ago

designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin said: Not only are they not hiring for the nitpicky reasons, they are laying off for any little offense. If not they make something up if they don't like you.

I really think they need to look at how the hiring person treats applicants. The person hiring needs to make a good impression. They are representing the company. Even if it is only a test of how the applicant will react, how is the applicant to know? All they see is a company they don't want to work for, because it will only get worse when hired.

I agree with you on that, I've encountered many rude interviewers, one time during an interview the person didn't ask me anything or even let me speak, he kept babbling about feminism and how he hated politics......so weird. On top of that, his dog was in the room barking and it chewed on my shoes.

The weirdest interview ever...

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Lyn

58 months ago

And speak Spanish.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

58 months ago

Little miss sunshine in London, United Kingdom said: I agree with you on that, I've encountered many rude interviewers, one time during an interview the person didn't ask me anything or even let me speak, he kept babbling about feminism and how he hated politics......so weird. On top of that, his dog was in the room barking and it chewed on my shoes.

The weirdest interview ever...

I'd say that was a weird interview. I just interviewed at a place today that had two big dogs walking around. The place was pretty small so I don't know why they would have dogs in there. Just getting in the way of things.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

58 months ago

When I was out of work back in '98, I went to this one staffing agency in downtown Philadelphia. I was in there for three hours and going through the entire application process. During the interview, the woman (who I interviewed with) was correcting my resume as I was speaking. This really bothered me. I gave her a piece of my mind, and I refuse to deal with agency ever again. I think they have since gone out of business.

Another time, I called this one staffing agency, and I didn't like the way the guy questioned me on the phone. I cut it short right there and then.

Also, when I was out of work back in '84, I went to another agency in downtown Philadelphia, and I didn't like the way the girl questioned me. I called her the next day and let her know that I did not appreciate the way that I was treated when I was in to see her.

If prospective employers are going to be rude to you during an interview, just simiply give them a piece of your mind and tell them that you're not interested. You don't need to work for somebody like that.

I hate to say it, but all employers care about today is making money and hiring a "perfectionist."

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della b in detroit, Michigan

58 months ago

LT in Newark, New Jersey said: The woman conducting my interview today was so rude and unprofessional.When she came to get me she called me by the wrong name. Her tone when asking questions was harsh and she made several nasty comments after I answered questions. I have over 14 years experience in the field I am interviewing for so I am not taking this personally because she was rude right from the beginning. I am just tired of dealing with unprofessional interviewers. There is no reason to ever treat someone badly.I would never work at this company.I have been interviewing for several months now and I am really turned off. Anyone else feel this way? Thanks.

OMG I remeber this interview I went to earlier this year for this indy pharmacy 1. My interview was at 1pm this idiot didn't show up till 2pm then he started ?ing my abilities like i was lying saying that 'i hope ur not lying bc Im goin to check ur old job. so after I left he calls be back 2 hours later sayin I got the job..I never showed up ha!!

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

58 months ago

Does anyone else get interviewers that don't call you to set up an interview, but just email you to say they want to meet with you? I hate that. It seems so impersonal. I've had it where it went back and forth with 3 to 4 emails. One phone call would have done it. You can't tell me that an HR person too busy to make a phone call. You would think they would want to see what that person sounds like on a phone. Just laziness I think.

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Little miss sunshine in London, United Kingdom

58 months ago

designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin said: Does anyone else get interviewers that don't call you to set up an interview, but just email you to say they want to meet with you? I hate that. It seems so impersonal. I've had it where it went back and forth with 3 to 4 emails. One phone call would have done it. You can't tell me that an HR person too busy to make a phone call. You would think they would want to see what that person sounds like on a phone. Just laziness I think.

Yea that's disrespectful and rude. I sent my application to a company, got a response a few days later (email) saying I have an interview. So I agree on a day & time and when I get there, another applicant is there having interview! Ok a bit confused as I was, I tried to do my best. Luckily it was an informal interview but the thing was that the only one who got anything to say was the interviewer, he didn't ask me nor the other person anything. And then all of a sudden ANOTHER person joins in.
Ok so after 2 hours the interview is finally over, on the question 'could you tell me a bit about the recruitment process? the interviewer seemed very annoyed, telling us 'that's an unpolite question'
The day after the interview I emailed him a thank you note and got reply that he would like to speak more to me, suggesting I would call him. During the chat he didn't say anything I didn't already know, but gave me a project to do during the coming weekend. The task was to answer the question 'what can you bring/contribute to this company?' I sat the whole weekend brainstorming and scetching my ideas and thought, and sent the document to his email yesterday. Today morning I got a response saying he'd LOVE to talk more to me and discuss what I've written in order to get to the next level, 'why don't you call me so we can take this further?' he wrote. Why doesn't he hire me if he's interested?

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Little miss sunshine in London, United Kingdom

58 months ago

...more to come...
and here is the thing: I called him, no answer. I called him back, he answered saying he would call me back. Waited, no call. I called back, he said he was busy ordering a sandwich and said he'd call me back within 15 mins, otherwise I'd call him back. So I did and he finally picked up.

During that chat, again, he didn't tell me anything new or anything about the job per se. He said he'd love to discuss my ideas at a meeting next week and I agreed on a day & time. When I asked him to confirm the interview he said, and I am not kidding you: 'My inbox is full with emails and I am so busy, why don't YOU send me the confirmation?'
After that talk I felt very annoyed about the whole thing. Are prospective employers suppose to treat their applicants like this, do they think they can do it just because it's crunch time?
I am gonna drop the whole thing and find work elsewhere, where an employer would actually see my talent straight away and give me the chance. Tell me what you think.

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Little miss sunshine in London, United Kingdom

58 months ago

...it's like, I was thinking to myself 'you have time to send me an email saying you'd love to discuss this further, but you're asking ME to call YOU??, There is no possibility you could actually call ME?'

If the employer was really interesting in someone he/she would make the call because he /she would know that that person is valuable and sought after on the job market.

Should I just ignore sending that confirmation email (which I think is silly!)
Ok sorry guys for babbling about this hehe
I need feedback

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Little miss sunshine in London, United Kingdom

58 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: You should be annoyed. You are being strung along. Apparently that individual cannot get up the gumption to say "yes" or "no" about offering further interviews or the job.

I agree that he should call you for the next round. He will call if he is sufficiently interested in hiring you. You need not send the confirmation e-mail.

At least in the U.S., inquiring about the recruitment process, including the number of candidates being interviewed, next step and time frame to expect a followup, is appropriate and not in the least bit impolite or pushy.

Thank you! Maybe I should relocate to the United States ;)
And definately, I am not going to be a pushover. Honestly that was a joke to me when he said that he couldn't even send me a confirmation email. Very unorganised and confusing, do I want to work for a company like that? No.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

58 months ago

No, don't work for unorganized companies that are confused. I did that once and that was a nightmare. The boss was a psycho too. Kind of like a Devil Wears Prada type of boss.

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Lovely Lady in Houston, Texas

55 months ago

Are You Serious in Denver, Colorado said: Bad manners and rudeness from employers and people in general has definitely inspired me to use good manners, common sense and treat others well, especially since those things seem so rare now days. Employers and others with bad manners, are definitely leaving an impression in a few short minutes with people, but I guarantee it's NOT exactly, a very favorable one.

vry well said.. i just had an interview this week, for a dream opportunity for me.. I have taken time to educate myself and make myself qualifiable for a company and the position I was seeking and the recruiters treated me as if my experience meant nothing.. if you ask me I felt the two were intimidated because I offered what they lacked... EXperience and EDucation.. Jealousy sometimes and intimidation plays a part when youre dealing with REcruiters.. Must always remember we are dealing with humans.. but God will ensure the reaping will outweigh the sowing in their regards... Keep your head up and stay focused

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Out of Work in Albany, California

55 months ago

I have been reading the horror stories on the rudeness and lack of professionalism in the job market lately on the part of employers and I thought I was alone...So to add to these stories, here's a few I've encountered during some recent interviews:

1) in one interview a hiring manager kept talking bad about the last person he had interviewed, how he thought the lady would be "pissed off" working with the other team members if he hired her and how she had had a million other jobs. He also then started talking about the other person who is leaving the job and how she is not very assertive and how he needs this new person to be assertive. just the fact that he was talking about other people that way was a big red flag that i didn't want to continue discussions with them.

2) In another interview, one of the people that interviewed me asked me quite cavalier "so what have you been doing lately...passing the time?" Geez, you would think that she thought I was sitting on the couch eating bon bons and watching Oprah for her to ask me so rudely. It's not like I am not looking for a job and just shooting the breeze...but it seems like the employers think that just because you are unemployed you are doing just that.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

55 months ago

Good catch on the gossiping hiring manager. Makes you wonder what he would say about you.

Yes, we have nothing better to do but watch TV and sit around. I don't even watch much TV even though I have the time right now. I'd rather keep busy with other more important things.

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Are You Serious in Denver, Colorado

55 months ago

Out of Work in Albany, California said: I have been reading the horror stories on the rudeness and lack of professionalism in the job market lately on the part of employers and I thought I was alone...So to add to these stories, here's a few I've encountered during some recent interviews:

1) in one interview a hiring manager kept talking bad about the last person he had interviewed, how he thought the lady would be "pissed off" working with the other team members if he hired her and how she had had a million other jobs. He also then started talking about the other person who is leaving the job and how she is not very assertive and how he needs this new person to be assertive. just the fact that he was talking about other people that way was a big red flag that i didn't want to continue discussions with them.

2) In another interview, one of the people that interviewed me asked me quite cavalier "so what have you been doing lately...passing the time?" Geez, you would think that she thought I was sitting on the couch eating bon bons and watching Oprah for her to ask me so rudely. It's not like I am not looking for a job and just shooting the breeze...but it seems like the employers think that just because you are unemployed you are doing just that.

To the employers who group all the unemployed into the lazy, inactive, couch lizard catagory> I'm thinking, "You know. I can't speak for other people, but I actually have hobbies, interests, sporting and recreational activities I participate in. I'm not into popping frito lay and bean dip and drinking cola on my sofa, 24/7. I take after my father, I refuse to lead that type of unexciting, mediocre and very boring lifestyle."

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miami777 in Spokane, Washington

52 months ago

Yes interviewers can be rude especially when they want young blood and you are 66 aplying for a job as a car salesman. I went to an interview at a dealership in Traverse City, Mi. and they were ignoring me hoping I would go away and finaly some young punk appeaared and said, "I want people who are trainable, and I don't think you are. I am a professional nurse and that is a lot more difficlut then selling a stupid car. He said if we call you in two hours, you have the job. The call never came. I am still nursing and thre sales job never developed. I hope the pig who interviewed me has bad karma.

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Pedralee in Winder, Georgia

52 months ago

sexysteelerfan in Mcdonough, Georgia said: Displaced, I have to disagree with you here. So, what was that courageous woman supposed to do when the interviewer asked her to explain "recent gaps in employment"? Just curious....

look up the dead peasant law people. by michael moore

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frustrated-phd in San Francisco, California

52 months ago

I had a phone interview with a recruiter that was like that. First she e-mails me and tells me that my resume looks impressive and that she wants to talk to me. Then we schedule an phone interview for the next day. I call her at the scheduled time and state my name and she goes "who are you?" I state my name for the second time and she goes "who? what?" and I state my name for the third time. Finally she recognizes me and recognizes that she scheduled this interview just yesterday. I just said "well nevermind" and hung up on her.

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miami777 in Spokane, Washington

52 months ago

When you go for an interview and they put two on one, just walk away. It is bad enough to deal with one pig and two is an unfair advantage. Maybe you should bring a buddy with you to make it even. They ask you dumb questions, like why did you quit your last job? The answer, none of your business. Another one is what did you like best of your former job? Answer nothing, thats why I quit. In summation, all interviewers are pigs.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

52 months ago

I imagine the reason for 2 people interviewing at once is so you don't have to make another trip to be interviewed. I don't have a problem with this as long as the interviewers are pleasant and don't play good cop/bad cop to see how you react.

I've been in a interview where 2 people interviewed 3 of us at once. I didn't care for the group interview thing. I think that's just because they are lazy and didn't want to schedule an private meeting with people.

I was also in an interview where I walked into a group of 10 people seated at a big table. I was introduced to all and then showed them my portfolio. At that point everyone left and one person remained to begin the real interview. It was just a way to introduce me to everyone I would work with.

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