How To Identify Contact Person?

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Unhappily Employed in West Haven, Connecticut

38 months ago

I am working with a career coach who insists that resumes and cover letters should be sent directly to the person who will do the hiring. This makes sense of course, except that most online job postings fail to provide this information, asking you to instead upload the resume and type the letter into a dialog box without any indication of who will see it.

My coach has advised me to seek company personnel info online and then make a phone call to subtly determine which person to contact. This has me extremely anxious, as I've never done anything like this before.

Is there anyone here who has had success with this technique, and can you give me some pointers? I'm on the verge of applying in the next few days so I'm expected to get this information quite soon. Thanks.

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Bluetea in Texas

38 months ago

Unhappily Employed in West Haven, Connecticut said: I am working with a career coach who insists that resumes and cover letters should be sent directly to the person who will do the hiring. This makes sense of course, except that most online job postings fail to provide this information, asking you to instead upload the resume and type the letter into a dialog box without any indication of who will see it.

My coach has advised me to seek company personnel info online and then make a phone call to subtly determine which person to contact. This has me extremely anxious, as I've never done anything like this before.

Is there anyone here who has had success with this technique, and can you give me some pointers? I'm on the verge of applying in the next few days so I'm expected to get this information quite soon. Thanks.

Why do you think most online job postings fail to provide this information?

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jenab in Austin, Texas

38 months ago

Unhappily Employed in West Haven, Connecticut said: I am working with a career coach who insists that resumes and cover letters should be sent directly to the person who will do the hiring. This makes sense of course, except that most online job postings fail to provide this information

it's easier to find than others... the job req might help you glean the department/business unit. Then you can look at both the company website and LinkedIn first. The more specialized the position, the more useful keywords will be in tracking down the right people.

Look for directories, press releases, blog posts, and the reqs directly on the site, which sometimes include direct contact information that isn't in postings on external sites.

On LinkedIn, search for the company, and do a keyword search. You an also do a web search, and do a business journal search (if the area you're in has a business journal. Twitter can be surprisingly useful to track down people for some fields (if there's a tech or biz dev connection, there's a greater chance of finding unexpected info through Twitter). Try multiple variations of keywords to help winnow down results.

I find the least likely people to have public LinkedIn profiles are HR execs, government employees at the senior management level, and people at companies who are particularly careful about managing their online presence -- but it's not always the companies you'd think would do that. Here it's usually people at orgs who are developing bleeding edge tech, or financial orgs, and government orgs.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

38 months ago

Unhappily Employed in West Haven, Connecticut said: My coach has advised me to seek company personnel info online and then make a phone call to subtly determine which person to contact. This has me extremely anxious, as I've never done anything like this before.

As for the phone calls, try to reach out to people who are NOT the hiring manager first (if you've even found that name yet).

Try for someone who is a level or two lower in the organization, and not a direct report. They're much more likely to be forthcoming (about names and even the culture, and they're less likely to be competing for a position in the same business unit).

I haven't done this very much, but I've had success with it when reaching out to people I know in the organization, but not in the specific area for the req. I've gotten a lot more information that way, as well as had them forward my resume directly to the hiring manager (and cc'd me so I knew exactly what they'd said about me).

Good luck.

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Unhappily Employed in West Haven, Connecticut

38 months ago

Thanks for the replies, but I'm not having any success at all finding even a single name of a person who works there. Thing is, it's an enormous worldwide company and the office I'd be applying for is apparently a very small branch. So when I search on LinkedIn, I see tens of thousands of employees from all over the world. I can't seem to figure out how to narrow it down.

I'm tempted to simply call the office and ask for a name, but I think this could be risky. What if the person who answers is in fact the hiring manager, or they transfer me to the person without asking questions? I would be unprepared and also not in the best of circumstances (this being because I'd be calling from my current job and would not be able to have a lengthy discussion).

Yeah, I know I have this tendency to make a big deal of everything, but there's no denying this is more overwhelming than I'm used to.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

38 months ago

Your career coach should realize the hiring manager will most likely kick your materials downstairs to HR.

In that case you should call the employer and ask for the name of the person who entertains resumes. Then direct your materials directly to that person. Don't risk pissing off the hiring manager with an end run.

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Bluetea in Texas

38 months ago

Unhappily Employed in West Haven, Connecticut said: Thanks for the replies, but I'm not having any success at all finding even a single name of a person who works there. Thing is, it's an enormous worldwide company and the office I'd be applying for is apparently a very small branch. So when I search on LinkedIn, I see tens of thousands of employees from all over the world. I can't seem to figure out how to narrow it down.

I'm tempted to simply call the office and ask for a name, but I think this could be risky. What if the person who answers is in fact the hiring manager, or they transfer me to the person without asking questions? I would be unprepared and also not in the best of circumstances (this being because I'd be calling from my current job and would not be able to have a lengthy discussion).

Yeah, I know I have this tendency to make a big deal of everything, but there's no denying this is more overwhelming than I'm used to.

Even you found the name and sent your resume in a FedEx envelope, they will either 1. Send it to HR or 2. Write out their grocery list on the back of it.

Unless you have a previously established relationship with a hiring authority (think Ivanka Trump) this isn't the best use of your time.

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