Things that you don't really want to hear in an interview

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Bluetea in Texas

21 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: I no longer believe anything I hear in an interview, the entire of interviewing is highly unnatural and very one sided. The interviewer will say and do many things that are contradictory to the conclusion and its often meaningless.

Nothing really means anything until you have a written offer with a contract.

See, you are learning. In lieu of your first paycheck, its all horse****. LOL!

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

21 months ago

I have definitely learned this, it really and truly is BS. How is interviewing even a feasible way to determine whether someone can do the job? its just bizarre.

How is one to make an impression amongst 10 other candidate? What to do when the interviewer is an egomaniac and only wants to talk about themselves? How to make an effective case when theres only two made up on the spot questions with no note taking?

What do they want?!? I'm groomed, relatively attracted, I smile, give a strong handshake, have a (from what I've been told) great resume with no gaps and a progressive work history, I articulate myself and have good answers for questions.

Then it becomes this line of thinking....did I do enough of this? not enough of that? ...a little too much of this and not enough of that?

It can't always come back to the interviewee. I refuse to believe that. I'm self aware enough to know what I'm doing and plan before hand. Who are these freaks running these interviews? How did they land their positions? How do they get away with being so unprofessional?

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

21 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: I have walked out on on two, maybe three interviews. I wasn't nasty but it was pointless to continue.

There's a couple of interviews I was close to walking out of. I'm thinking there was a third one, but can't think of it at the moment.

One job was many years ago at some factory. I was young and stupid, but it still gives me the willies. The guy interviewing me kept putting his arm around my shoulder as we walked around the building. I didn't like it at all, but didn't know what to say. It was a crappy place to work besides that. I sure didn't like the old tub-o-lard getting so chummy with me. I wanted to run far away. Ick!

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

21 months ago

designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin said:

One job was many years ago at some factory. I was young and stupid, but it still gives me the willies. The guy interviewing me kept putting his arm around my shoulder as we walked around the building.

Something I would do.

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

21 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said:

How is one to make an impression amongst 10 other candidate?

I know. And how does the interviewer remember candidate 2 or 3 whom he interviewed 3 days ago?

Years ago they called in 1 person, if they did decent the job was theirs, if they bomb then they would call someone else in.

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Parafreegal in Chicago, Illinois

21 months ago

Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York said: I know. And how does the interviewer remember candidate 2 or 3 whom he interviewed 3 days ago?

Years ago they called in 1 person, if they did decent the job was theirs, if they bomb then they would call someone else in.

Real unemployment is something like 15%. They know.

Good posts, Cheshire.

I'm sure most interviewers decide on you right there in the interview. Many of them are just HR people/hiring managers and don't really know the nuts and bolts of the job. They won't be working with you. So they're basically just judging your character and responses. You know, playing God. Awful people, they are, for the most part.

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John in Catonsville, Maryland

21 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: I have definitely learned this, it really and truly is BS. How is interviewing even a feasible way to determine whether someone can do the job? its just bizarre.

How is one to make an impression amongst 10 other candidate? What to do when the interviewer is an egomaniac and only wants to talk about themselves? How to make an effective case when theres only two made up on the spot questions with no note taking?

What do they want?!? I'm groomed, relatively attracted, I smile, give a strong handshake, have a (from what I've been told) great resume with no gaps and a progressive work history, I articulate myself and have good answers for questions.

Then it becomes this line of thinking....did I do enough of this? not enough of that? ...a little too much of this and not enough of that?

It can't always come back to the interviewee. I refuse to believe that. I'm self aware enough to know what I'm doing and plan before hand. Who are these freaks running these interviews? How did they land their positions? How do they get away with being so unprofessional?

It sounds like you are feeling the frustration I have been feeling for the past number of years. Except you have been able to get more interviews (I might suspect due to different fields).

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Bluetea in Texas

21 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: I have definitely learned this, it really and truly is BS. How is interviewing even a feasible way to determine whether someone can do the job? its just bizarre.

How is one to make an impression amongst 10 other candidate? What to do when the interviewer is an egomaniac and only wants to talk about themselves? How to make an effective case when theres only two made up on the spot questions with no note taking?

What do they want?!? I'm groomed, relatively attracted, I smile, give a strong handshake, have a (from what I've been told) great resume with no gaps and a progressive work history, I articulate myself and have good answers for questions.

Then it becomes this line of thinking....did I do enough of this? not enough of that? ...a little too much of this and not enough of that?

It can't always come back to the interviewee. I refuse to believe that. I'm self aware enough to know what I'm doing and plan before hand. Who are these freaks running these interviews? How did they land their positions? How do they get away with being so unprofessional?

Sounds like a blind date. A bad one.

"Waiter? Check please".

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

21 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: I have definitely learned this, it really and truly is BS. How is interviewing even a feasible way to determine whether someone can do the job? its just bizarre.

How is one to make an impression amongst 10 other candidate? What to do when the interviewer is an egomaniac and only wants to talk about themselves? How to make an effective case when theres only two made up on the spot questions with no note taking?

What do they want?!? I'm groomed, relatively attracted, I smile, give a strong handshake, have a (from what I've been told) great resume with no gaps and a progressive work history, I articulate myself and have good answers for questions.

Then it becomes this line of thinking....did I do enough of this? not enough of that? ...a little too much of this and not enough of that?

It can't always come back to the interviewee. I refuse to believe that. I'm self aware enough to know what I'm doing and plan before hand. Who are these freaks running these interviews? How did they land their positions? How do they get away with being so unprofessional?

So very strange how you being from Canada you go thru the same thing us Americans are going thru in regards to the job search. We should just invade you guys and make it one big country and make Donald Trump king.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

21 months ago

Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York said: So very strange how you being from Canada you go thru the same thing us Americans are going thru in regards to the job search. We should just invade you guys and make it one big country and make Donald Trump king.

Oh trust me, thinks aren't all fine and dandy here either. Thing is, the media doesn't report on it as much, I'll see information but it's not front page news. I know new grads are struggling and people have said to me more than once how tough things are out there. Its just not a happy topic, so nobody wants to discuss at length. They'd rather pretend it doesn't exist and keep info to themselves. We really are getting competitive, in more ways than one.

I will gladly share info with my peers including giving them company names and offering to let them use me as a referral, I have started believing in karma. Plus, lets face it in terms of reality should something come up in the future who is going to be more inclined to help me out?

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

21 months ago

Parafreegal in Chicago, Illinois said: Real unemployment is something like 15%. They know.

Good posts, Cheshire.

I'm sure most interviewers decide on you right there in the interview. Many of them are just HR people/hiring managers and don't really know the nuts and bolts of the job. They won't be working with you. So they're basically just judging your character and responses. You know, playing God. Awful people, they are, for the most part.

Agreed 100%, somedays I feel like I should just go into recruiting. Seems like they'll take anyone.

I have a feeling I'm coming across too serious as well. I'm not bubbly and giggly enough. My responses are too blunt and lean on the more practical side of things rather than the creative ones. I also feel that my lack of ability to make small talk is really interfering, my mind goes blank and all I can do is smile. I really need to work on that.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

21 months ago

Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York said: Something I would do.

If you did that now, you wouldn't be able to walk straight after that. ;)

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

21 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: I'm not bubbly and giggly enough.
If you were, my former attorney-boss would love you. He always waxed eloquently about one of his former (female) paralegals and her bubbly personality. It made me want to barf. He complained that my relationship with him was too stiff and formal. What did he want? A professional relationship or a bubbly one?
Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: My responses are too blunt and lean on the more practical side of things rather than the creative ones. I also feel that my lack of ability to make small talk is really interfering, my mind goes blank and all I can do is smile. I really need to work on that.
I can tell from your posts that you are someone who is well prepared for her interviews, so just be yourself.

Again, continued good luck with your efforts.

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

21 months ago

designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin said: If you did that now, you wouldn't be able to walk straight after that. ;)

Hey, NYers are the touch feely types, what can I say.

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

21 months ago

touchy feely types

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

21 months ago

QUOTE who="Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado"]If you were, my former attorney-boss would love you. He always waxed eloquently about one of his former (female) paralegals and her bubbly personality. It made me want to barf. He complained that my relationship with him was too stiff and formal. What did he want? A professional relationship or a bubbly one?

I think this depends, people want to work with those they like and feel they can talk too/have some sort of relationship with. This makes some sense to me, if you're working 40-60hrs a week you want to surround yourself with likeminded people.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

21 months ago

I've read so many blogs/articles what have you, that that talk about how hiring managers are now asking more questions about your interests and what you do outside of work rather than technical ones....which while it strikes me as weird, just proves the point.

What you can do and how you've done it in the past is just a way now to get in front of the hiring manager and get an interview.

How to answer 'tell me something about yourself not related to work?' or 'what do you do in your spare time?' are the focus here. I find it sad at the same time...why would an organization want a group of clones? It just leads to 'groupthink' you're not getting any original ideas or diversity.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

21 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: I think this depends, people want to work with those they like and feel they can talk too/have some sort of relationship with. This makes some sense to me, if you're working 40-60hrs a week you want to surround yourself with likeminded people.
At the outset, this anal attorney was not bubbly. Far from it; he had a bad sense of humor and did not comprehend dry humor.

That attorney took advantage of this gal's apparent naivety. He and the firm investigator played practical jokes on her. He told me a story something to the effect that a cop had nailed her for speeding. According to the attorney, she told him her speedometer was inop. She didn't understand why. According to this attorney, he and the firm investigator explained to her that a mouse or hamster running a treadmill operated the speedometer. She then exclaimed, "NO SIR!!"

Maybe I'm more serious about things than some people, but I found his actions in this instance to be rather juvenile.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

21 months ago

Further, the point I'm really trying to make is an issue of respect is involved. She was a good paralegal and did not warrant his derision.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

21 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: How to answer 'tell me something about yourself not related to work?' or 'what do you do in your spare time?' are the focus here. I find it sad at the same time...
It's NYOB. Also a way to be rejected.

I like football. What if the interviewer hates football or despises sports altogether? I exercise. What if the interviewer is some fatass prediabetic whose doctor has repeatedly lectured him/her to put down the Dunkin Donuts and get on that treadmill?

If I noticed knickknacks in the office that indicate an interest and I have a like interest, I would mention it; I think that doing so in one interview helped me get a job. Otherwise, I would give some hopefully innocuous answer or, depending on the situation, ask how it relates to doing the job.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

21 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: How is one to make an impression amongst 10 other candidate? ...What do they want?!?

If you get to the interview stage, then something you've done impressed them. NO one wants to do job interviews just to do them, and the fewer candidates they have to talk to the better.

At this point, it's often just getting a sense that your resume isn't BS, and that you're a good cultural fit, and there are no unpleasant surprises. That alone is the reason why interviews are required. It's expensive to onboard a new hire, so they don't want to make a mistake so easily avoided by interviewing.

When I did recruiting, this veteran recruiter in my office needed help brainstorming how to diplomatically tell a Sr SW Dev engineer that he blew a $120K job with amazing benefits because he showed up at the face to face interviews with the client with pungent body odor. It's an extreme example, but the things people do to botch interviews are endless.

They do know you're nervous when you interview; and yeah, there are certainly some jerks who are antagonist or try to sabotage candidates. It's unprofessional, but it happens.

When the people involved know how to conduct interviews, they're looking at so many factors, and usually it's the soft skills that will be the deciding factor. There's often an evaluation form they use post-interview (or even during) that includes the questions to ask, and an scoring section. They usually know pretty quickly who goes into the slush pile, and who merits additional consideration. And when it comes time to the final decision, it's often something really small that means Candidate A gets the offer instead of Candidate B even though they both would clearly be able to do the job.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

21 months ago

I can't post anything in this thread! so annoying

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

21 months ago

I'll try again....stupid word limit!

Thanks Unemployed Paralegal, best of luck to you too.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

21 months ago

jenab in Austin, Texas said: If you get to the interview stage, then something you've done impressed them. NO one wants to do job interviews just to do them, and the fewer candidates they have to talk to the better.....When the people involved know how to conduct interviews, they're looking at so many factors, and usually it's the soft skills that will be the deciding factor. There's often an evaluation form they use post-interview (or even during) that includes the questions to ask, and an scoring section. They usually know pretty quickly who goes into the slush pile, and who merits additional consideration. And when it comes time to the final decision, it's often something really small that means Candidate A gets the offer instead of Candidate B even though they both would clearly be able to do the job.

I think for me its continously coming across people who DON'T know how to interview, and a lack of connection between myself and the interview....so I need to work on my soft skills. My resume has no exaggeration/lies on it. I wouldn't be able to keep it up.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

21 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: I think for me its continously coming across people who DON'T know how to interview, and a lack of connection between myself and the interview....so I need to work on my soft skills. My resume has no exaggeration/lies on it. I wouldn't be able to keep it up.

You don't strike me as someone who would exaggerate; unfortunately employers can't really tell that until they talk to people. Job titles mean nothing, and resumes don't get you the job.

I know I tend to encounter people who don't leave much room for me to talk. It's harder to develop a conversation when it's so one-sided, but being prepped with stories of how my past work experience relates to their job req helps. Although sometimes even that doesn't help.

You seem very articulate here; are you comfortable talking to strangers?

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

21 months ago

I can tell you past feedback I'm gotten, including from my last contract job.....the manager that hired me described me as a 'firecracker' he said he could tell that I was serious, really wanted it and would do a good job. You're right when you say resumes don't get people the job, he glanced at it and put it aside. He told me that people will lie through their teeth and that the feeling he got from me was genuine.

I managed to make an impression on him. I didn't do anything different though thats the funny part, I have stories and ways to answer certain questions (b/c I've been asked them so often) that just come out naturally now. I also give good eye contact and I know that helps validate what I'm saying. I also make sure to smile a lot (I have a natural expression that can be read as angry or reserved lol).

The hiring managers I came across last year generally (with the exception of a rare few) kept it conversational. They talked A LOT, no lie here....on and on and on and on, maybe I made them nervous? I would interject here and there and go 'me too' or 'I know what you mean.' This probably indicates that a connection wasn't made, it wasn't a two sided conversation. Connecting with people has been a life long struggle for me in general. My mind goes blank and it feels forced.

I feel like I can't get too analytical with it....I can't place the blame entirely on myself either. A lot of the conclusions to my interviews were out of my hands. Right now it feels like a matter or timing, being at the right place at the right time and luck.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

21 months ago

I am totally comfortable talking to strangers, in fact thats what my casual work revolves around....interacting with hundreds of different types of people at events (its marketing work).

I have been told by recruiters (whose word I'll take with a grain of salt...since I've had far too many negative experiences with them) that I present well and am articulate....and ultimately get to meet the hiring manager.

I can't pinpoint what it could be (experience and industry knowledge isn't an issue). The interviewer just doesn't like me enough for whatever reason.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

21 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: Right now it feels like a matter or timing, being at the right place at the right time and luck.

Fortune favors the prepared. :D

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jenab in Austin, Texas

21 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: I can't pinpoint what it could be (experience and industry knowledge isn't an issue). The interviewer just doesn't like me enough for whatever reason.

Do you have any friends or family that you trust to give candid advice that you can do a practice interview with? That might help pinpoint what might (or might not) be happening.

And it can simply be you have the dubious fortune of being the loser in a coin toss when it comes to choosing between good candidates. The odds of winning a coin toss don't improve the more times the coin is tossed (even though it feels that way).

Such as "It's down to Bluetea and Cheshire. Chesire is energetic, with and it's obvious she'd bring a fresh perspective to the team, learns quickly, and I think she could really grow into this position. Bluetea's breadth of experience means she already understands what we're doing, and she clearly clicked with Joe. I think Bluetea would be a more seamless fit for our particular needs."

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Meghan in Dayton, Ohio

21 months ago

If we only had the nerve, once we realize, it isn't happening, to just say the things you all have said. Yesterday I am at the end of the interview,and get," well if I don't see you again, I wish you well.!!

What the heck was that about? If I don't see you again ... have a nice life.
Was I not just interviewing for a job with you??

We must keep laughing.!

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still retired in Texas

21 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: Heh! I heard it yesterday. I can be interesting once, maybe twice but I don't have enough material for a 3rd go round.

amen to that bluetea! Its enough I have to dress up im wearing purple dress and large earring hoops...just sayin, going in for the kill..lol

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Bluetea in Texas

21 months ago

still retired in Texas said: amen to that bluetea! Its enough I have to dress up im wearing purple dress and large earring hoops...just sayin, going in for the kill..lol

LOL! 3rd interview? Bring your accordian. Now its a talent show.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

21 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: LOL! 3rd interview? Bring your accordian. Now its a talent show.

It's like dating w/intent to marry, and the third interview is usually like meeting the family, with less catty comments in earshot. Or the third date with the third date rule.

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Bluetea in Texas

21 months ago

jenab in Austin, Texas said: It's like dating w/intent to marry, and the third interview is usually like meeting the family, with less catty comments in earshot. Or the third date with the third date rule.

A 3rd interview means you are in a Demolition Derby.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

21 months ago

jenab in Austin, Texas said: "It's down to Bluetea and Cheshire. Chesire is energetic, with and it's obvious she'd bring a fresh perspective to the team, learns quickly, and I think she could really grow into this position. Bluetea's breadth of experience means she already understands what we're doing, and she clearly clicked with Joe. I think Bluetea would be a more seamless fit for our particular needs."
For once the older, experienced candidate gets the job and age discrimination is overcome.

No disrespect intended to Cheshire, who clearly is articulate but just deserves a chance.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

21 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: LOL! 3rd interview? Bring your accordian. Now its a talent show.
You should have to attend attorney interviews.

In fairness, multiple interviews in some industries, such as aviation, are the norm. But in aviation, generally, the interviews are all conducted in one day.

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Bluetea in Texas

21 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: For once the older, experienced candidate gets the job and age discrimination is overcome.

No disrespect intended to Cheshire, who clearly is articulate but just deserves a chance.

Bluetea is a dowdy Luddite whose idea of technology is an electric pencil sharpener.

Lets go with the kid, er what's her name? The one who still lives at home. Shes less likely to need knee replacement in the next six months.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

21 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: Bluetea is a dowdy Luddite whose idea of technology is an electric pencil sharpener.
You forgot Royal manual typewriter.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

21 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: Bluetea is a dowdy Luddite whose idea of technology is an electric pencil sharpener.

Lets go with the kid, er what's her name? The one who still lives at home. Shes less likely to need knee replacement in the next six months.

Needs a knee replacement? Then ya know she won't be wandering away from her desk.

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Bluetea in Texas

21 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: You forgot Royal manual typewriter.

The good old days eh Mister. Unemployed? My IBM Selectric typewriter with a lit cigarette sitting in the ashtray, next to it.

Nobody said a word.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

21 months ago

IBM Selectric was an excellent piece of equipment. We may have used them in the newsroom.

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Bluetea in Texas

21 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: IBM Selectric was an excellent piece of equipment. We may have used them in the newsroom.

I still miss it. I heard that there is some kind of HOG group for IBM Selectric afficianados. LOL!

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

21 months ago

Typewriter...click, click, tap, tappa, tap, click, tap, Ding!

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Bluetea in Texas

21 months ago

designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin said: Typewriter...click, click, tap, tappa, tap, click, tap, Ding!

We still do that except there is no Ding anymore...and no ashtray.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

21 months ago

jenab in Austin, Texas said: Do you have any friends or family that you trust to give candid advice that you can do a practice interview with? That might help pinpoint what might (or might not) be happening.

And it can simply be you have the dubious fortune of being the loser in a coin toss when it comes to choosing between good candidates. The odds of winning a coin toss don't improve the more times the coin is tossed (even though it feels that way).

I'm not sure how much the practice interviews would help me. It's probably worth a shot to get a second opinion, these things are so subjective though. I guess I don't understand how I was able to get all my past jobs...do I all of a sudden suck or what? I actually found there was more openness to employers before I found my first entry level job. They were genuinely interested. Now that I have my last job on my resume its like I dont have this or that, or enough of this. Its dumb. I regret not holding out for a better job when I had the chance, I thought I was doing the right thing taking up the opportunity and paying my dues. At that company I definitely did.

I think its more a case of your second scenario. I'm still fairly entry level, the role is broad and generic enough that theres a bottleneck of candidates when a position opens up (which is fairly infrequently), I know my competition has the same type of stuff on their resumes (thanks to LinkedIn) so then it comes down to those distinctive qualities (personality, hobbies, connections, hitting it off with interviewer) etc.

I decided that I wasn't going to interview just to interview in the new year and no more recruiters. I need to try something different and work on projecting a more interesting, unique personality.

Thanks everyone for the kind words.

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

21 months ago

The next time I get asked what my hobbies are I'm going to say stuff that would indicate I'm highly social and 'with it.' Give them what they want. Although it's truly none of their business, my real hobbies are fairly anti-social and not in keeping with the expectations of those in my industry.

I'll talk about how I backpacked through Europe and how I love to go out to new venues with 50 of my closest friends. How I'm so exhausted from my active nightlife.

I think I'm going to have some fun with interviews. I have a friend who put this perspective to me, she said its a game and she loves playing it (she's older, has a lot of experience and an HR background). I'm gonna give it a shot and see if this helps.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

21 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: I think I'm going to have some fun with interviews. I have a friend who put this perspective to me, she said its a game and she loves playing it (she's older, has a lot of experience and an HR background). I'm gonna give it a shot and see if this helps.

It is a game; a story telling game with some cat and mouse thrown in. While they're looking for red flags in what you say and don't say, you should do the same. I don't recommend the stories not be real, but truths are relatively flexible. You'd tell the same truth in three different ways to a toddler, a teen, and your parents; it's the same thing with the different people you interview with (although it's not always so easy to tell which is which).

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jenab in Austin, Texas

21 months ago

designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin said: Typewriter...click, click, tap, tappa, tap, click, tap, Ding!

Bluetea in Texas said: We still do that except there is no Ding anymore...and no ashtray.

And the creative profanity when the correction tape runs out and there's not a spare to be found.

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still retired in Texas

21 months ago

jenab in Austin, Texas said: And the creative profanity when the correction tape runs out and there's not a spare to be found.

chew gum and blow/pop bubbles LOUDLY....while listening to Air Supply

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Bluetea in Texas

21 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: The next time I get asked what my hobbies are I'm going to say stuff that would indicate I'm highly social and 'with it.' Give them what they want. Although it's truly none of their business, my real hobbies are fairly anti-social and not in keeping with the expectations of those in my industry.

I'll talk about how I backpacked through Europe and how I love to go out to new venues with 50 of my closest friends. How I'm so exhausted from my active nightlife.

I think I'm going to have some fun with interviews. I have a friend who put this perspective to me, she said its a game and she loves playing it (she's older, has a lot of experience and an HR background). I'm gonna give it a shot and see if this helps.

When I was with the bank, one question they asked of new tellers was "What do you like to do in your spare time?" Sounds innocent enough but it was a Hire/No Hire question.

Anything like backpacking through Europe, climbing K2 or even an ocean cruise made you a No Hire.

Most tellers are part time and their schedules change EVERY week! They wanted their tellers to live within 5 miles of the branch, raising cats and reading romance novels.

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