How to decline a job offer while already signed and accepting it. since I have come accross a better job offer from another firm

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Salah in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

19 months ago

Please can somebody give me advice. I have accepted a job offer A and now i want to decline it because i got another job offer B from another company.. I am fully satisfied with offer B and want to accept it and decline the offer A. What should I speak to the employer A. is there any legal obligation by rejecting the accepted offer letter? I am very confused.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

19 months ago

You didn't sign a contract, did you? Assuming that you didn't, you don't have to resort to a white lie. "At-will" employment works both ways. You can decline an offer or leave an employer outright at any time, without notice and without explanation. So thank them anyway, you changed your mind and accept the second offer.

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Keypoint in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

Im in the same boat. Was working for company A, but found a job that better fits my skills/personality and took it. Quit with company A and was to start with company B in 2 weeks. In the meantime, another job with company C comes in which was not expected (the first 2-3 weeks there was no activity or inclination at all with co. C) with almost 60% more pay.

I honestly hate to do this to company B but I don't think there is a legal issue. More of a personal comfort level and moral/ethical compass thing. You aren't doing anything illegal by turning down a job you already accepted but I know that if something happened the employer could just as well turn around and rescind their job offer before I start ( or even after for that matter) if it was in their best interest. I'm not comfortable with it personally as it makes me feel bad but it is too much of a pay increase to turn down for me right now. You gotta do what you gotta do. Btw, both positions are almost identical duties and responsibilites, same hours, benefits, etc etc...

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Salah in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

19 months ago

Actually still I have not sat down in this boat. But I am working in Company A and I have submitted my resignation with 30 days notice period 15 days before, because I signed the job offer letter from Company B. and i told them I will join you after the resignation period finished.I mean that i still have 15 days to join Company B.. but i received a call from Company C and they are giving me a golden job offer which I will receive today or tomorrow. so I want to decline the offer B. Because the C is more beneficial for me in every type which you mentioned. if i want to decline the offer B So what the story should i tell them. Lie or truth? I hope you have got my point..

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Unix Brat in Asheville, North Carolina

19 months ago

"Mr. Boss:

"Effective immediately, I am giving notice of my two week resignation. Thank you for the opportunity to work for you at xyz company.

"Respectfully,

Salah"

Put your typed and signed resignation letter in an envelope on your boss's desk when s/he has stepped away. Have your desk cleaned out the day before you do this; it is likely you will be escorted out the door and won't have time for packing.

Keep your demeanor professional. Lying is not necessary.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

19 months ago

Keypoint in Los Angeles, California said: Make no mistake about it, your bridges with Company B will be burnt whether you decide to spend the time because you care and explain it to them nicely with deep regret after much deliberation on your part or you go with Unemployed Paralegal's advice and tell them nothing and simply don't show up on your first day or tell them you got a better job, period.
I never said to tell them nothing and simply not show up. I did not say that at all. You cannot do that.

I said the OP can simply decline B's offer. That is all the OP needs to say to B. Period. No explanation, excuse or white lie is needed.

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Keypoint in Los Angeles, California said: Actually, we are in the same exact boat. I have no problem with quitting A and have already given notice. While I'm waiting out the 2 week start time for Company B, I get an unexpected offer with Company C with much better everything. While the decision to turn down an offer from Company B did not come lightly, ultimately I decided to go with Company C after I accepted offer from B before I started to actually work for them.

Make no mistake about it, your bridges with Company B will be burnt whether you decide to spend the time because you care and explain it to them nicely with deep regret after much deliberation on your part or you go with Unemployed Paralegal's advice and tell them nothing and simply don't show up on your first day or tell them you got a better job, period.

Just comes down to your personality and comfort level. Neither way is right or wrong. Just the fact that you even posted here tells me that you care and that you feel some sort of legit explanation is owed on your part towards Company B. Keep it short either way.

Burning bridges can't be helped. Still, the guilt will be short lived.

I got my last job because of this. I wasn't their first choice, Their "dream candidate" turned down their offer and the company was on the phone with me five minutes later. This too, happens more than you think.

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HopefulGuy in New Jersey

19 months ago

That is a very good dilemma that very few people have come across. I've also been lucky enough to experience this golden rarity.

In this situation, anything short of an in-person appearance or an actual phone conversation would be considered very insulting---so no emails at this point. What I did was i actually called the company that i was declining and said something like " Although I am definitely appreciative of your offer and although it is very attractive and although I was very much looking forward to joining you, I however, have been made another offer that was very hard to turn down, I regard you with the utmost respect, and once again, thank you so very much for the opportunity that you've decided to offer me."

But, you should let this company have a chance. Unless your mind is really set, you should give them a chance to counteroffer and see if they can give you more salary or better benefits. This can actually give them an impression that it was purely a business decision and it's not like you just didn't want to work for them.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

19 months ago

I believe my comments are being misread and read into. To clarify:

I never said not to be tactful or unappreciative. I never said not to show up to the job under any circumstances; regrets should be sent ASAP before the start date so the employer can line up another candidate. I certainly do not condone lying of any kind, even so-called white lies. A lie is a lie.

My point, again, is you are not obligated to volunteer to B any explanations as to why you changed your mind. You can simply say you decided to take a different direction. It's up to you if you want to answer any questions B might have about why you changed your mind, but, once again, you are not obligated to volunteer any explanations as to why you changed your mind.

Be assured that unless a contract is in place the employer would have no compunction whatsoever about changing its mind about you and withdrawing an offer. Even then, the contract may be unenforceable or it wouldn't be worth your while to try to enforce it. Knowing that, again, the employer would have no compunction about withdrawing an offer.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

19 months ago

Calfornian in Hayward, California said: I've always found the 2-weeks concept interesting and I've never really understood it. People get fired all the time without notice so why is the employer entitled to some special kind of treatment?
Really. "At-will" employment cuts both ways. It's too bad that employees are so indoctrinated in the master-servant concept that they are afraid to tell employers to take the job and shove it or not give notice because of burning bridges fear.

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Guy in United Kingdom

19 months ago

Can someone advise, I've been offered a job offer. But they haven't signed and told me to sign, send two copies and they'll return original signed and stamped.

Is this a tactic. i.e bidding for more time their side.

Am I right in thinking, this only becomes legally binding when / if I recieve the original back?

The fact I've signed and persumably, without verification their side (in terms of signing, doesn't make this 'binding'.)

If I wanted to back out, could I (yes, I've signed)

Cheers and appreciate replies....good, relavant posts. Thanks

Guy

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Guy in United Kingdom

19 months ago

In my case this is an offer of employment, so...isn't legally binding until both signatures are in play...does that mean I physically have to have orginal delivered and in my hand to be a concrete offer?

And even then, from what previous threads have suggested, employer even then can revoke or recind, or visa versa on my part?

Doesn't give one 100% certainty and guarantee then?

Thanks for reply

Guy

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Guy in United Kingdom said: In my case this is an offer of employment, so...isn't legally binding until both signatures are in play...does that mean I physically have to have orginal delivered and in my hand to be a concrete offer?

And even then, from what previous threads have suggested, employer even then can revoke or recind, or visa versa on my part?

Doesn't give one 100% certainty and guarantee then?

Thanks for reply

Guy

If you want a guarantee, buy a toaster. Offers of employment mean nothing here in the colonies. Just a formality.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

19 months ago

Guy in United Kingdom said: In my case this is an offer of employment, so...isn't legally binding until both signatures are in play...does that mean I physically have to have original delivered and in my hand to be a concrete offer?

And even then, from what previous threads have suggested, employer even then can revoke or rescind, or visa versa on my part?

Doesn't give one 100% certainty and guarantee then?

In this country, "at-will" employment is generally the law. I explained "at-will employment" above. Even if employer and employee sign an employment offer, IMO the employer can rescind it. The sad thing is even if the offer is deemed a contract, employee has virtually chance of enforcing it. By the same token, employee could back out - and what is the employer going to do about it?

Once again, nothing is guaranteed.

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Guy in United Kingdom

19 months ago

Unbelievable state of play and confidence isn't it?

So, what does 'landing a job mean?'?

Job Offer?

Contract?

Binding agreement?

Legally Binding?

What do people think, sending a job offer, with employer NOT signing and getting me perspective employee to sign, saying on receipt, they post back original. This is a 1st for me this way round and can only think they're binding their time, without definite obligation and committment.

What do I do, twiddle my thumbs until original returns or continue to scout around?

Guy

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Guy in United Kingdom

19 months ago

Thanks Paralegal and Blue Tea for your replies!!

Guy

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Guy in United Kingdom said: Unbelievable state of play and confidence isn't it?

So, what does 'landing a job mean?'?

Job Offer?

Contract?

Binding agreement?

Legally Binding?

What do people think, sending a job offer, with employer NOT signing and getting me perspective employee to sign, saying on receipt, they post back original. This is a 1st for me this way round and can only think they're binding their time, without definite obligation and committment.

What do I do, twiddle my thumbs until original returns or continue to scout around?

Guy

Until you get your first paycheck, you never stop looking. Never. Right now, you have nothing.

I got my last job but I wasn't their first choice. He/She backed out when their "dream job" came through. I was the low-bidder and next on the list. Heh!

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

19 months ago

Guy in United Kingdom said: What do I do, twiddle my thumbs until original returns or continue to scout around?
You keep looking.

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Jeff in Silver Spring, Maryland

19 months ago

It's normal to feel some sense of obligation to someone you've told that you will work for them. But rest assured that if you sacrifice a chance a better job because of this sense of obligation you will never be rewarded for doing so.

I had the opposite problem recently. The day I began my drive to my new job site, someone called with an invitation to interview. How do explain to Company B why you are willing to walk away from Company A after you've just started working for them? This is especially uncomfortable because I, like a number of people here, took a job that I had no real interest in because I need the money.

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John in Catonsville, Maryland

17 months ago

In this job market (at least in the US), why would you want to decline an offer? Are there are stipulations against attending other interviews?

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Dirk in Levittown, New York

16 months ago

Contrary to what some of the other poster s have mentioned with the best of intentions, a white lie to a potential new employer is not a good idea. Most likely, the job offers are in the same field. Depending on the industry, your new management team is sure to have contacts at their competition. Be a straight shooter and they will understand that you are going for the offer that makes the most sense for YOU. A burnt bridge is one that can never be crossed again...just remember that. Good luck.

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Mr Gagill in Monticello, New York

16 months ago

Meg in San Jose, California said: Just use a white lie... say something along the line that "due to an unexpected family issue, I regret to inform you that I have to rescind my acceptence of your offer at this time." And, no need to provide details if asked. It's not uncommon for new hires 1)not to show up for a new job or; 2) leave after a very short time. Don't feel bad as employers terminate employees at will so there's no employee royalty these days. If the 2nd offer is better, by all means go for it!

The chick who wrote this is actually a Recruiter!

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Similar Situation in New Hope, Pennsylvania

14 months ago

I have a similar situation although it's a bit trickier because it only involves 2 companies.

I work at Company A and in December we decided we were going to move out of state by August. I work remotely from home most of the time anyways, so I went in and asked about being able to continue doing my job from my new location. To my surprise, the manager said that wouldn't be possible, all employees in this office have to live in state, even if we don't actually come to the office.

There are lots of other offices around the country, so he suggested I look into transferring to one that would allow me to work in the new state. I spent a few months sending out emails and researching other offices, even asked my project manager and while he said it seemed feasible, he was dragging his feet and nothing was moving forward.

So then I started to apply to positions with other companies that are located in the new state. I found one that was a really good match, and they were interested in me as well. We had 2 phone interviews and a video interview, then offered me the job at a significant raise (33% more). That sounded great, so I accepted the offer the next day.

I emailed my project manager and told him that since nothing had gone forward regarding a transfer, I was going to accept a position with this new company. That lit a fire under him apparently, because by the end of the week he had put together an offer in which I was assured a transfer to his office so that I would be able to stay on the project by working remotely from my new home. He even offered me salary greater than the new company was offering.

So, my problem is basically the same as the original - I've already accepted the offer with the new company, but am now considering staying with my current company due to this new development. Is it poor form to contact them nearly a week and a half after accepting (but my start date is still 2 weeks away)?

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Similar Situation in New Hope, Pennsylvania

14 months ago

Also, I really didn't intend to use this as a way to get a raise or anything. All I wanted to do was to be able to move to a new state. If my current company had just said "sure, no problem" and transferred me, I wouldn't have even applied to the new position in the first place. Ugh.

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Need New Job in Chicago, Illinois

14 months ago

I've been on the receiving end of this as an employer and also as a job seeker. Here's what you need to keep in mind:

- you do what makes sense to YOU. You are not legally or morally obligated to one offer over the other
- if you do pass on an offer you already accepted, you will most likely be blacklisted at that company. People may not want to hear that, but it's true. When the company made the offer to you and you accepted, they most likely went back and told their others candidates that they were going in another direction. So now their hiring process has to start over, which costs them time and money. Yeah, they are going to be pissed at you. I tell you this so you have both sides when making a decision.

If you are going to rescind your acceptance (and there is nothing wrong with doing that), you should do it sooner than later. The closer to that start date you get, the more of a bind you put them in.

Question for you - do you really want to stay at the old company? They only helped you out as an extreme reactionary measure. Your new company, on the other hand, made a competitive offer in an attempt to gain you as an employee.

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Bluetea in Texas

14 months ago

Need New Job in Chicago, Illinois said: I've been on the receiving end of this as an employer and also as a job seeker. Here's what you need to keep in mind:

- you do what makes sense to YOU. You are not legally or morally obligated to one offer over the other
- if you do pass on an offer you already accepted, you will most likely be blacklisted at that company. People may not want to hear that, but it's true. When the company made the offer to you and you accepted, they most likely went back and told their others candidates that they were going in another direction. So now their hiring process has to start over, which costs them time and money. Yeah, they are going to be pissed at you. I tell you this so you have both sides when making a decision.

If you are going to rescind your acceptance (and there is nothing wrong with doing that), you should do it sooner than later. The closer to that start date you get, the more of a bind you put them in.

Question for you - do you really want to stay at the old company? They only helped you out as an extreme reactionary measure. Your new company, on the other hand, made a competitive offer in an attempt to gain you as an employee.

I agree 100%.

Where my sister works, they keep the apps around for about a month, even AFTER there is a hire. Every now and then, someone doesn't even last a month.

I actually got my last job that way. I wasn't their first choice. He/Shes "dream job" came through and I was Miss. Runner Up. LOL!

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Need New Job in Chicago, Illinois

14 months ago

I hate being the consolation prize. To date, my pride has not allowed me to do it, but I'm sure there are circumstances where I would.

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Bluetea in Texas

14 months ago

Need New Job in Chicago, Illinois said: I hate being the consolation prize. To date, my pride has not allowed me to do it, but I'm sure there are circumstances where I would.

Many of us are actually "the consolation prize". Its just that most of us never find out.

I happen to find this out, after someone from my department let it slip. Heh!

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Unemployed NP in Bountiful, Utah

8 months ago

This is an old thread, but thought I would post anyway. I was laid off the week before Thanksgiving, for which I told was amicable reasons and would be rehireable. Nonetheless many political issues. I have applied for 4 jobs a week as required for unemployment. Only one interview, for a faculty position at a community college. It's the holiday season, and I figured this was par for the course in healthcare. Finally, I landed an interview at a occupational health clinic. I received an offer ridiculously low. However, I was able to set up a negotiation meeting. My counter offer was accepted, of 32% less than my previous job wages. I made arrangements to start this week. However, during my negotiation meeting, and acceptance of my job my phone was vibrating from several phone calls. After my meeting, I found two voice mails of company's offering interviews, and one solid offer. The solid offer I called immediately. They offered me a 20% increase over my last job. And about 60k over the job I just accepted, for which I just negotiated a higher wage. Of course, the hitch was I would be providing services for the company I was recently laid off from.
When the new employer text me to say he had forgot to draft the agreed upon offer, I was forthright, and told him of my new offers after meeting with him today. Of course, he was less than thrilled and when I asked him for a couple of days to speak with this other company. He asked how much time I needed, because he could use the time to interview other applicants he had. He reluctantly agreed to have me call him later in the week to give my final decision.
How serendipitous, to receive an offer like that after accepting one for so much less. Of course, I have taken a huge gamble, and I believe more than likely by the end of the week, I will have one job offer that did not pan out, and a solid offer that was rescinded albeit much less than what I could afford take. Not sure what else I could have done.

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rakeshsharma2297 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

6 months ago

one of my friend has accepted and signed an offer in dubai a week before and have been been offered by another company better salary and growth prospects. What are legal consequences if declines the signed offer as per the UAE law to the first company?

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NMK in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

6 months ago

rakeshsharma2297 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates said: one of my friend has accepted and signed an offer in dubai a week before and have been been offered by another company better salary and growth prospects. What are legal consequences if declines the signed offer as per the UAE law to the first company?

I am in the same boat..in case you have got some information..do share with me..thanks in anticipation....

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Salah in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

6 months ago

Dear All,

I am the originator of this post. Once upon a time I received the same and I was really confused to take a decision and then I went through this forum and I found many positive advices and some nagitives so I contacted ministry of employment, as per UAE employment rules I was entitled to decline the first one offer and then I did the same. I moved to the better offer and joined the dream company and position. Now it has been 1 been year I am working here and reading your posts.
So my advice is that first contact to the company manager tell him/her clearly with the formal discussion that I want to decline your company offer and want to join another company which has good offer. I hope they tell you the same that send an email for decling the offer letter and you can move no problem.

Good Luck

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wwwatch in Hsinchu, Taiwan

5 months ago

I'm just about to decline Company A's offer tomorrow which I have accepted 3 wks ago. I have a more suitable position from Company B today. I was supposed to start work in a week at Company A.

I plan to call the HR head who sent the offer to me. Then I would call hiring manager as well soon after that. I will see if the HR head needs anything in writing.

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BabyBelle

5 months ago

Employer A: Interviewed in January. During interview, mentioned/offered 10K more than employer B, and a potential start date in February. I mailed a hard-copy thank you note, and email at that time. I then took a certification exam the first week of March, and emailed him that I'd passed and mailed a hand-written note that I'd passed. I didn't hear from him until today (end of March) saying he is very interested in me and wants to meet with me again.

Employer B: Interviewed in October, but I couldn't work until after cert exam in March. Interviewed in January, still interested. Answers all emails and cards promptly. Offered me a position last week & mailed a contract Friday, which needs revisions. It is currently on the employer/hiring mgrs. desk who is out of town until Monday. I've taken a drug screen, passed background check & references have been cleared.

Choice: 10K to employer A (privately owned company) who has been lukewarm & unresponsive until now verses accepting 10K less from employer B (corporation) if they meet my contract revision requests, and has been very kind and professional in interviews.

This is not a fun decision.

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Teflon Cat in Columbia, Maryland

3 months ago

I was in the same scenario as you 4 weeks ago. I accepted the position with the company that was responsive, and easy to deal with. Think about it once you start working with company A, would you be happy if this is how they treat you now.

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Confused in Australia

2 months ago

I am going through this now. Serving my last few days in Company A. Emailed company B and called them too. But they are trying to scare me saying you are burning all bridges here. Company C is their competitor and I am a little worried, if the HR have contacts with each other and might call company C HR. I've already been blacklisted by company B now whether I accept or reject.

Not a fun time

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Ruby Slippers in Las Vegas, Nevada

2 months ago

Confused in Australia said: I am going through this now. Serving my last few days in Company A. Emailed company B and called them too. But they are trying to scare me saying you are burning all bridges here. Company C is their competitor and I am a little worried, if the HR have contacts with each other and might call company C HR. I've already been blacklisted by company B now whether I accept or reject.

Not a fun time

Sometimes you have to burn bridges; you have no choice. Just remember that this is business. Its what they will tell you when they lay you off. Its just business.

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