I sent a follow-up email and got a nasty response

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Matthew Howland in Clyde, New York

62 months ago

Jen,

I am not sure that the person meant to be rude. Some people are just very direct and to the point and in doing so come across as being rude.

He may have been a little annoyed with your follow up because he told you that he would contact you, but I would not let it bother you too much. I don't think that it will reflect poorly because it shows that you are persistent and organized in your job search.

I think that if you end up working with the person you will find that many of his emails are written that very way. One to two lines.

Matt
[comment edited by forum moderator]

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Jen in Calverton, New York

62 months ago

I am really kicking myself for sending a follow-up email. I should have listened to my gut and not have sent it. I hate to say it but I was listening to everyone else saying you should send a follow-up email. Never again will I do this. The only reason I sent an email was because they had sent me an email asking for my references a week or so after the initial interview and now in total it's basically a month after the interview. They already gave me the starting salary so they can't change the salary....I currently have a job so I don't need this job but I want it. :(

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Jen in Calverton, New York

62 months ago

Just to add an update I got the job! :)

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Matthew Howland in Clyde, New York

62 months ago

Jen in Calverton, New York said: Just to add an update I got the job! :)

So that follow up call did not sink you. I would be interested to find out if they hired you because you followed up, or if they had already made the decision by that point.

Matt
[comment edited by forum moderator]

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georgebuffet in London, United Kingdom

61 months ago

Hi There !!

Congratulations. I think the job is ok and they are very nice to you.

:)

Regards,
George Buffet

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Robert in Concord, North Carolina

59 months ago

One thing that appears to have been overlooked is the job function. If the position is in sales, following up will always be highly regarded. Would you hire a sales person that was not persistent?

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Guy in Ohio in Cleveland, Ohio

59 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: She had sent a followup e-mail. In this situation, it probably made no difference. But IMO, based on my experiences, followups can hurt and don't help. You cannot hurry a hiring process, and particularly the government's.

Displaced - we have been down this road before. I think she did NOTHING wrong, and to the contrary, might have been picked BECAUSE she sent the follow up e-mail.

Sometimes showing some initiative and asking the tough questions provides a good result.

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Guy in Ohio in Cleveland, Ohio

59 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Sales is different other jobs. In a sales interview one is expected to be aggressive and persistent. Assuming the interviewer is a sales manager or similar position. I heard the best way to answer the "where do you expect to be in five years question" is by saying you expect to have the interviewer's job in one year. One would never say that statement in any other interview. Pure speculation. I stand by my advice because it is sound.

Once again, the company KNOWS you are interested in the job. You've expressed your interest three ways. 1) You applied for the job, either proactively by sending a cold letter of interest and resume. Therein, you've exhibited initiative; 2) You attended the interview(s). The interview(s) was your "day in court," as it were; 3) You sent a thank-you letter(s).

The company "gets it." Anything further can queer your chances.

Yes I work in sales. And Yes you are expected to be agressive. However, your first comment about saying you expect to have the interviewers job- is either a niave statement, or a bad joke. Regardless, it's not a good answer to give in an interview.

I do understand and respect your point of view regarding job seeking, however at times I do not agree with it. My wife does not work in sales, but she was told she got a job over another candidate because she DID call to do a follow up check.

Does a company really know you are interested by the 3 steps you mentioned? Well- you applied for a job cause you THOUGHT it sounded interesting, you went on the interview to FIND OUT MORE, and you wrote a thank you letter because it's the right thing to do.

Lets say I am invited to a Birthday party- I show up, give a gift, and get a thank you note for attending. We both followed the "protocal", but did either of us have a good time? not sure.

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Guy in Ohio in Cleveland, Ohio

59 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Sales is different from other jobs. In a sales interview one is expected to be dynamic, aggressive and persistent. Assuming the interviewer is a sales manager or similar position, I heard the best way to answer the "where do you expect to be in five years question" is by saying you expect to have the interviewer's job in one year. One would never say that statement in any other interview. Pure speculation. I stand by my advice because it is sound.

Once again, the company KNOWS you are interested in the job. You've expressed your interest three ways. 1) You applied for the job, either proactively by sending a cold letter of interest and resume, or by answering an ad, or through networking. Therein, you've exhibited initiative, Or maybe the company or a headhunter sought you out and you responded; 2) You attended the interview(s). The interview(s) was your "day in court," as it were; 3) You sent a thank-you letter(s).

The company "gets it." Anything further can queer your chances.

(sorry for multiple posts)

I wanted to ad, but ran out of room..... I am not trying to put you down, so I hope this doesn't come off bad:

It sounds from reading your posts that you put the job and company on a pedastal, where I as a potential employee is lucky to get an interview, and am at the companyies mercy.

Maybe it's a generational gap, or a gap in what we do, but i don't agree with that. I feel a company would be lucky to have me, and if I am applying while still employed, or mulling over multiple job options, then the ball is in my court, not theirs.

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Guy in Ohio in Cleveland, Ohio

59 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Continued.....

You certainly have a high opinion of yourself and your abilities. That's fine. I was raised to believe I am lucky to have a job and to be working. Fast-forward my upbringing to the here and now. It's true - people who have jobs should consider themselves fortunate. I was also raised to respect the company and the boss, and to be loyal to the company, and to work hard. It's called "work ethic."

Perhaps you haven't thought of it in these terms, but employers do you a favor by interviewing you. Especially true in these recessionary, high-unemployment, layoff times. As a practical matter, look at it from the employer's point of view. The employer is busy. Hiring a new employee(s) is an interruption and distraction. The employer doesn't want to be bothered. The employer will make up its mind when ready.

The employer wants to conclude the hiring process, so if you have impressed him/her, he/she will waste no time in calling you. If you did not impress the employer, no amount of following-up will sway his/her opinion. In fact, repeated followups may very well antagonize the employer and tarnish your image. You need or want the job, right? Do you want to risk antagonizing someone who has something you want? Be smart - don't follow up.

Displaced, I have also had non sales jobs, and I think you are very uniformed to think that sales = Need to be pushy. I have a great relationship with many of my customers, one that i would not get if I were "pushy"

And, I think we will agree to disagree on this- but employees are NOT doing me a favor be interviewing me. They have a need, I (along with others) have a skill. It is mutually beneficial. I have a very solid work ethic, and do respect my employer, but hiring me, or any employee is not an "interruption and distraction" If there was no employee needed, they would not be hiring.

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Guy in Ohio in Cleveland, Ohio

59 months ago

employees are hired to help a company increase profits, either by directly or indirectly increasing productivity, increase sales, increase billable hours etc, etc, etc.

20 years ago, the "Oh please sir, may I kindly have a job" little me, big company might have worked.

But this is 2009, just like e-mail is preferred over snail mail by a GREAT MAJORITY of bosses, you have to adjust to the times.

Might your way work better- yes, depending on the manager and company culture

Might my way work better - yes, depending on the manager and company culture.

My advice to others, do what you are most comfortable with, because it will help you find a company and boss that you fit in best with.

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Guy in Ohio in Cleveland, Ohio

59 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: ....and you need a job or want a better job. Sure, we can agree to disagree, if you want - but I stand by my advice.

Once again, employers have something you want. The long and short of it is employers can find plenty of people like you that can perform the skill as well or better than you can. So be grateful you've been given an interview. Approach the interviewer with your hat in your hand. Do nothing that could even remotely queer your chances.

I am always respectful and grateful. When it comes to putting them on a pedastal and bowing down to them, I draw the line.

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Guy in Ohio in Cleveland, Ohio

59 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Once again, I stand by my advice.

and I stand by mine.

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paranoid android in Denver, Colorado

59 months ago

Maybe it's just my experience, but the HR department always seems to be operating separately from the rest of the company. Typically the only time I ever get to know someone from HR is during the interview, then when I start working there I never see the person again. And all the employees look at the HR department like some dungeon of bitter goings on, that no ones wants to approach.

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Guy in Ohio in Cleveland, Ohio

59 months ago

paranoid android in Denver, Colorado said: Maybe it's just my experience, but the HR department always seems to be operating separately from the rest of the company. Typically the only time I ever get to know someone from HR is during the interview, then when I start working there I never see the person again. And all the employees look at the HR department like some dungeon of bitter goings on, that no ones wants to approach.

At Bigger companies, this is sometimes done be design. HR departments know lots of personal information that people do not want spread around.

Do you have a garnishment? Child Support Payment? Did you happen to get some workmans comp? Do you have to provide insurance for children out of wedlock that you had many many years ago? who is taking a loan against a 401K, etc, etc etc.

With all that private personal knowledge, lots of times its for everyones safety that they don't interact with many of the rest of the employees.

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Patty in Cocoa, Florida

59 months ago

Why don't we ask Jen if she was hired because she followed up or it did not make a difference?

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Guy in Ohio in Cleveland, Ohio

59 months ago

Mike in Tulsa, Oklahoma said: I'm in a similar situation as Jen was. I am applied for a federal position with a Bankruptcy Court on Aug. 5 the closing date was Aug. 21. After the closing date I emailed on Aug. 25 to check the status they emailed me and stated that they were reviewing candidates to move forward with the interview process. Now it is Sept. 1st and I have not heard anything yet. Should I follow up? I have email once to make sure they got my resume and once to check the status after the closing. Should I email one more time to ask if they are done selecting candidates to move forward?

Mike- I think at this point you have showed you are interested, persistent and on task. You don't want to be that person who will be seen as a micro-manager of everything that is done.

At this point short of having another job you are willing to take I would not e-mail further.

The only communiation you could make at this point is:

Dear Sir/Madam,

I was wondering where I stood with the open position. I have been offered another job at x company, but you are my first choice. Please let me know as if I don't hear I will be accepting this other job.

But make sure you have another job and are not playing chicken.

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Mike in Tulsa, Oklahoma

59 months ago

Thanks for your comments. I will just hold off. I guess it is the not knowing part that gets me.

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chicago jobseeker in Chicago, Illinois

58 months ago

Here is my situation. I applied for a Federal job in May. I was interiewed over the phone in August and the same interviewer (who would be my boss) flew down and gave me a second interview in September. I was told I would hear back, either way, by a certain date (within 10 days time). She also mentioned that she checked my references and that they were "phenomeonal". One week after that date I sent a polite e-mail to my interviewer to ask about the status of my application, no response. The next week I followed up with a call to the HR department politely inquiring about my status, no response. Am I to assume I did not get the position?

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aprillove in Cagayan De Oro

58 months ago

hi...jen! that's mostly happen in applying a job in the internet...don't be surprised if you hear nothing or any response from the company.

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Rucker in Highland Mills, New York

58 months ago

Jen in Calverton, New York said: Just to add an update I got the job! :)

Congratulations!

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HR Hiring Individual in Denver, Colorado

57 months ago

I have worked in HR (State) for several years and will give you some good information.

1) Jen didn't do anything wrong by following up..just don't do more than one follow-up either email or phone. You don't want to come off as desperate but you do want to make sure that they know your interest in the position.
2) State, Government, and Federal jobs have a different hiring process then most. We have to process req which take a long time for approval. It can take up two 2-8 months to fill a job and that is after the last three candidates were looked over.
3) Do one follow-up two weeks after and then leave it be. Apply for other jobs like you didn't get the job. Don't be surprised if you get a call several months later.

Jen you did the right thing. Chicago Job Seeker you already followed up with an email calling HR is not necessary. It just makes our jobs harder. YOu should just call or email once. If you don't hear a response don't take it negative. We are just overwhelmed with so much to do that we don't response back until the department makes thier decision. If you don't hear anything then you didn't get the job. I know that is not a professional practice but with today's market it is hard doing the work of three people and being able to follow up. Sorry to say that.

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Job Seeker in Norcross, Georgia

56 months ago

I interviewed with my husband's company for a position in a separate department, and the interviwer expressed that he liked the fact that he liked to hire from "within" meaning people who have been with the company previously or presently but he also said that those other candidates were over qualified. Then he said that I was "exactly what they were looking for" and would let me or my husband know what the decision would be but gave no exact timeframe. I interviewed on 11/19/09 (Thursday) and had my husband give him the thank you letter that Monday. During the interview he asked when I would be available to start, and I said the following Monday. I assumed that I didn't hear anything back because of the Thanksgiving Holiday. Also, one of the people that work in my husband's department spoke with the person that currently has the position that I interviewed for (she has been promoted and that's why her position is vacant) and she told him that "They didn't want anyone over qualified for the job" which is not me! It is the other candidates that the interviwer told me about that previously worked for the company.

I didn't hear anything last week when I sent the thank you letter (they stopped work on Thursday and Friday; I assumed I would hear something before the holiday so I could start on Monday. I haven't heard anything, and now I don't know if I should send a follow-up email after I already sent a typed thank you letter.

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Job Seeker in Norcross, Georgia

56 months ago

I knew you would say no lol. My husband said the same thing. I had already decided not to follow up soon after posting. I don't think I've given them enough time to make a decision; especially since the woman promoted is still doing the duties of the position I interviewed for.

The interviewer did mention that they would be looking to start and train the new hire within a couple of weeks and then quickly followed up with "not that we wouldn't start them sooner".

Thanks!

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Val in Alexandria, Virginia

56 months ago

I'm in a similar situation as many of you: went through a few rounds of interviews so now I'm just waiting to hear back with either a job offer or a decline. I know that they said they would get back to me by "next week", which is this week, but it's already Thursday afternoon and all this waiting and anticipation is killing me!

I do know that they've been contacting my references (since I spoke to one of them on Monday), so I assume that is a good sign after all the interviews I've had. I have been contemplating emailing them to ask what the status is on the whole process, but after finding this forum and reading our Displaced Legal Professional's comments, I've decided that it would be rather pushy at this point.

I think I may give them until Friday at 3pm if I don't hear back. I don't know... I assume that if they DO want to hire me, they'll let me know at some point! Follow-up emails are tricky especially when you're hungry for work!

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Guy in Ohio in Cleveland, Ohio

56 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Just how much interest must one really express to a company to be considered?? As I wrote, above, a candidate expresses interest in a job three times; by applying for the job, by attending an interview(s) and by sending a thank-you letter(s). Aren't applying, interviewing and thank-you letters enough to get the point across to HR that one is interested in the job?

I think we have been down this road before

Applying for the job says "Hi, I need a job, your opening sounds like something that I might like, I would love to hear more about it

Going to the interview is a weed-out process for both sides. There are times I have gone to an interview and realized that while maybe the job sounded like what I wanted either the company, my potential boss, the pay or benefits are something that I would not be comfortable with

The after interview thank you note I am guessing is seen as such a formality, that it doesn't reveal anything. It is a proper response to acknowledge the person meeting with you.

The Follow up e-mail or phone call is a confirmation that after meeting with you and hearing what you have to say I am still interested. Honestly, nothing ahead of time (depending on what exactly is said in the interivew) confirms that you are still interested in the job.

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Guy in Ohio in Cleveland, Ohio

56 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Not true. And is, thus, **an expression of interest.** Conversely, one may realize during the interview the job, the boss, and the pay or benefits are things with which one may be comfortable. For these reasons, then, **one would ensure or should ensure one expresses interest in the job during the interview.** An after-interview thank-you letter, if well-thought-out and well-written, is also an effective tool **to express interest in the job in no uncertain terms.**

Once more, one expresses interest in the job three times during the process. If the company is interested in you, the company will call you and ask if you are still interested in the job. Reminding the company you are interested in the job won't help you if it is not interested in you. It's that simple.

you asked a question. I gave an answer. Just like the HR guy- you didn't like it, so you countered your arguement. You must feel like you always need to get the last word in, and your opinion is the only one that is right.
I am just stating there are other lines of thinking besides yours. I will not get into a back and forth with you over it.

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greatminds in Savannah, Georgia

56 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said:

Also what do you think of companies who do not followup with candidates after interviews? Specifically, letting candidates know one way or the other if they'll be invited for more interviews or if they'll be offered the position. Why can't companies be courteous and considerate enough not to leave candidates hanging?? I understand that because of sheer volume no HR department can be expected anymore to acknowledge every single resume that passes across its desks, but attending in-office, in-person interviews is another matter.

I am waiting for an answer to that question as well Displaced.....

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greatminds in Savannah, Georgia

56 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: It's spelled "argument." I wasn't arguing with the state HR person, Guy. I asked a question of that person. I'd like that person to respond, along with my question about lack of employer followup.

In this instance, Guy, you have confused asking followup questions with "argueing."

I would like them to respond too. The question must be too hard Displaced.

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Jen in Wading River, New York

56 months ago

I am the individual who started this post a few months back. I actually now work in HR for the government. My advice would be that individuals should send professional thank you letters but do not reach out to individuals any futher unless they contact you. Honestly people talk and when certain individuals hound people other HR staff is aware as well.

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Jen in Wading River, New York

56 months ago

On a side note...I had posted about the lead interviewer responding in a nasty way to me. Well it turns out that that particular person is not good at writing emails. She has actually asked people to show her how to be more friendly in her emails, lol. I have gotten other emails from her like that and its nothing towards me just how she is via email....

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Job Seeker in Norcross, Georgia

55 months ago

It's me again (interviewed with my husband's company) and I had an interview with this company Monday Dec 21 and told I was going to get a second interview the following Wed or Thurs (before Christmas) so that the new hires could start Mon Jan 4. I didn't hear anything back and had already left two voicemails with my interviewer.

By this time it was Wed Dec 30, and to my surprise I got a call from the person doing the second interviews by phone. I felt like this interview went even better than the first one, and the interviwer seemed really pleased with my responses (she kept saying "good" and "we like that"). At the end of the interview I asked what the nex6t steps were, and she said she would send the initial interviwer an email and I should expect a call that day or the next day. Here it is Saturday Jan 2 (3:42AM)and I haven't heard anything.

I'm wondering if I will ever hear anything since both interviwers expressed that they wanted new hires to start Mon Jan 4. I hunted down the company website and got an email address but I am reluctant to send a thank you email because I have to address the interviwer by name and I'm not exactly sure how to spell it.

I just told myself that since it took them so long to call me for the second interview, maybe it will take just as long to get the call about a job offer.

What should I do??

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Job Seeker in Norcross, Georgia

55 months ago

By the way,

I never heard anything back from my husband's company, so I decided to email and quickly got a response saying they went with another applicant.

Makes me wish I would have sent a follow-up email earlier!!

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

55 months ago

It's obvious we are getting desperate.

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Job Seeker in Norcross, Georgia

55 months ago

Well I feel like I got it. I'm just tired of waiting. I have other offers on the table but this job is my first pick, and I want them to honor their timeline. I'll give them another couple of days, call, and then forget it.

And I'm not desperate; just impatient. And I don't like accepting my second pick and then my first pick drags feet and finally offers me a position.

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Job Seeker in Norcross, Georgia

55 months ago

I'm upfront so I want others, including employers, to be upfront with me as well. There's no ultimatum about it. It's fact... I'll wait a couple days and then move on. What else is there to do....

And yes it is extremely nice to have options. :)

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Job Seeker in Norcross, Georgia

55 months ago

I got it! Man they call late.

Thanks anyway.

Peace!!

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Job Seeker in Norcross, Georgia

55 months ago

I suppose. I guess everyone is different because I hear different things. I hear that the hiring person will more than likely give the job to the person that seems the most interested (following up frequently), and I've also heard that following up too much may turn the hiring person off.

I guess you just have to evaluate each situation.

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Replying to Displaced in Norcross, Georgia

55 months ago

Following up helps though. It does show that you are still interested and possibly put ahead of SOMEONE if not the top of te pile.

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Allentonian in Boca Raton, Florida

55 months ago

Jen in Oakdale, New York said: Hi,

Just wanted to share my experience and gather other opinions. I went on an interview for a position I really want 3 weeks ago. The day following my interview I sent a thank you letter to everyone on the interview. About a week later I received an email from the leader interviewer requesting my references (which was 2 weeks ago). I sent a followup email this morning to see what the status was-a very friendly and brief email expressing my interest in the position asking if they had finalize the decision. The response I got was VERY rude.-one line stating " Jen, A decision has not been finalized. As state on the interview all candidate will be notified."

Of course I'm playing scenarios in my head like if they were choosing me they would have been nicer. Or if they are debating between me and another candidate now I probably just made them want the other person.

What do you think?

This is a standard response, Dear; nothing rude.
Rude would've been NO ANSWER; at least you got a follow-up !!

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To Displaced in Norcross, Georgia

55 months ago

Well look at it like this Displaced,
If the company is stuck between 2 candidates and ONE of the candidates follows up with an email or call, that will be the deal maker for that candidate.

And they ask if you are still interested because in those few days or weeks it took them to get back to you, you could've accepted a position with another company.

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Jayden T in Alabama

55 months ago

Guy in Ohio in Cleveland, Ohio said: I wanted to ad, but ran out of room..... I am not trying to put you down, so I hope this doesn't come off bad:

It sounds from reading your posts that you put the job and company on a pedastal, where I as a potential employee is lucky to get an interview, and am at the companyies mercy.

Maybe it's a generational gap, or a gap in what we do, but i don't agree with that. I feel a company would be lucky to have me, and if I am applying while still employed, or mulling over multiple job options, then the ball is in my court, not theirs.

Now I agree with this post of yours.

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Jayden T in Alabama

55 months ago

HR Hiring Individual in Denver, Colorado said: I have worked in HR (State) for several years and will give you some good information.

1) Jen didn't do anything wrong by following up..just don't do more than one follow-up either email or phone. You don't want to come off as desperate but you do want to make sure that they know your interest in the position.
2) State, Government, and Federal jobs have a different hiring process then most. We have to process req which take a long time for approval. It can take up two 2-8 months to fill a job and that is after the last three candidates were looked over.
3) Do one follow-up two weeks after and then leave it be. Apply for other jobs like you didn't get the job. Don't be surprised if you get a call several months later.

Jen you did the right thing. Chicago Job Seeker you already followed up with an email calling HR is not necessary. It just makes our jobs harder. YOu should just call or email once. If you don't hear a response don't take it negative. We are just overwhelmed with so much to do that we don't response back until the department makes thier decision. If you don't hear anything then you didn't get the job. I know that is not a professional practice but with today's market it is hard doing the work of three people and being able to follow up. Sorry to say that.

Thanks for the information. Nice to have someone with a HR background to give an opinion.

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Jayden T in Alabama

55 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: This is my query to "HR Hiring Individual in Denver, Colorado" as it appears on p.1 of this thread:

I really would like to see the user, "HR Hiring Individual in Denver, Colorado," answer my questions.

I find it interesting that the HR Hiring Individual did not offer up an opinion about the in office interviewing and then not following up. I just think it gives insight that this person doesn't care, and this is the attitude a lot of the employers are taking these days. An in office interview should be followed up with a response or phone call no matter what the outcome is. Simple as that.

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skin.cares09 in West Palm Beach, Florida

55 months ago

Sent my resume and received a reply from the owner. He said he wanted to start an email conversation and move on from there. So we talked via email for 2 weeks at length several times a day. He then asked if he could call me. At this point I was very comfortable with him and welcomed a phone interview. Once we finally spoke, we chatted for hours. He said that the email interview set me apart from other candidates and the phone conversation was even better. He asked if he could fly me up the next week, since they would all be in town for their sales meeting/holiday party and to meet with the other owner (the more corporate type)
I flew in on Thursday, was welcomed warmly. Everyone was very casual and laid back. It seemed more like a week long holiday party than meeting. I was told it was my chance to interview them. I sat in product trainings, spoke with the other employees. I was given xmas gifts and taken to meals. I was scheduled to fly home the next day at noon. I assumed at some point they had time set aside to let me "interview" with the other owner. I arrived in the office at 830 Friday morning and sat with everyone, watching the clock tick on. At 10am the owner arrived. My limo was arriving at 1045. I was in a training and did not want to be rude. At 1032 I was asked to come and chat with the other owner. By the time he sat me down, I had 8 min to talk with him. Mind you I had done hours of prep work, compiled a full market strategy and was prepared to discuss the position.
To my surprise, he knew nothing about me. The 2 weeks of continuous interviewing with his partner was not shared. I was prepared to get into specifics and he didnt know a thing about me. After the 8 min speedy intro, he asked if I had any questions (while the taxi honked outside). I left with an uneasy feeling. I sent a follow up email twice since then. There was xmas and new years ik I was told they were talking to 2 other candidates and they would be intouch ASAP. Do I email again?

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skin.cares09 in West Palm Beach, Florida

55 months ago

It was a Regional Management position.
I have been considering that uneasy feeling. Its just becoming increasingly difficult to swallow. I have been getting to the end in several interviews and then nothing. The companies are dropping the professional ball with their follow up. I cant tell myself that every single job has the same problem!!!
It was apparent that there was a disconnect between the "good cop/bad cop" partners. I felt that my opportunity rested on the meeting with the bad cop, and perhaps I was right.
I just had such a great repore with the good cop, I was comfortable continuing our email relationship.
They compare their hiring method to a dating experience. I feel like I got dumped. And I questioned why I was flown in for a week long holiday party, but I assumed they knew their hiring process better than I did.

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

55 months ago

Most supposed job experts say it's perfectly fine to call the company to follow up within a week plus - assuming they have not told you in the interview when they plan of making a decision. So if they said that they will be making a decision in a month, don't call before that month ends.

In addition, very few people actually write a thank you letter accordng to job stats - like only 5% of people. So by writing one, you will at least stand out in this regard.

Lastly, most companies don't call you to let you know that you didn't get the job even if they say they will. So waiting for that phone call can drive one insane.

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

55 months ago

Most supposed job experts say it's perfectly fine to call the company to follow up within a week plus - assuming they have not told you in the interview when they plan of making a decision. So if they said that they will be making a decision in a month, don't call before that month ends.

In addition, very few people actually write a thank you letter accordng to job stats - like only 5% of people. So by writing one, you will at least stand out in this regard.

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

55 months ago

I said supposed, because everyone offering such advice thinks they are a job interview/employment guru, but having said that - I think it is still good advice. Most companies don't call you back to tell you that they have hired someone else, so best you call them.

Additionally, for me anyway - I always ask in an interview when they hope to make a decision and then request a time period when I should follow up with them ala if I don't hear from you by such and such date, do you mind if I touch base with you? It works and lets them know that a phone call will be coming at some point.

Only a sucker waits for the phone to ring. As long as you are patient and give them a reasonable amount of time to potentially come to a decision - a 5 second phone call following up is a smart thing to do.

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

55 months ago

Well see there is an art to that ONE follow up phone call. Never leave a message and don't let them know you are calling if possible (call block your number). What you want to do is wait until you get the person on the phone and then find out what the deal is. No repeated calls or further follow up - just that one.

I learned the hard way about never leaving messages. See some companies don't have an erase and re-record feature on their phone system, so when I screwed up on my message - I found out that I couldn't change it and now that message was going to go to my potential employer. It's just better to wait until you get them on the phone.

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