I sent a follow-up email and got a nasty response

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Matthew Howland in Clyde, New York

72 months ago

Jen,

I am not sure that the person meant to be rude. Some people are just very direct and to the point and in doing so come across as being rude.

He may have been a little annoyed with your follow up because he told you that he would contact you, but I would not let it bother you too much. I don't think that it will reflect poorly because it shows that you are persistent and organized in your job search.

I think that if you end up working with the person you will find that many of his emails are written that very way. One to two lines.

Matt
[comment edited by forum moderator]

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Matthew Howland in Clyde, New York

72 months ago

Jen in Calverton, New York said: Just to add an update I got the job! :)

So that follow up call did not sink you. I would be interested to find out if they hired you because you followed up, or if they had already made the decision by that point.

Matt
[comment edited by forum moderator]

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Jen in Wading River, New York

65 months ago

On a side note...I had posted about the lead interviewer responding in a nasty way to me. Well it turns out that that particular person is not good at writing emails. She has actually asked people to show her how to be more friendly in her emails, lol. I have gotten other emails from her like that and its nothing towards me just how she is via email....

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Job Seeker in Norcross, Georgia

65 months ago

It's me again (interviewed with my husband's company) and I had an interview with this company Monday Dec 21 and told I was going to get a second interview the following Wed or Thurs (before Christmas) so that the new hires could start Mon Jan 4. I didn't hear anything back and had already left two voicemails with my interviewer.

By this time it was Wed Dec 30, and to my surprise I got a call from the person doing the second interviews by phone. I felt like this interview went even better than the first one, and the interviwer seemed really pleased with my responses (she kept saying "good" and "we like that"). At the end of the interview I asked what the nex6t steps were, and she said she would send the initial interviwer an email and I should expect a call that day or the next day. Here it is Saturday Jan 2 (3:42AM)and I haven't heard anything.

I'm wondering if I will ever hear anything since both interviwers expressed that they wanted new hires to start Mon Jan 4. I hunted down the company website and got an email address but I am reluctant to send a thank you email because I have to address the interviwer by name and I'm not exactly sure how to spell it.

I just told myself that since it took them so long to call me for the second interview, maybe it will take just as long to get the call about a job offer.

What should I do??

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Job Seeker in Norcross, Georgia

65 months ago

By the way,

I never heard anything back from my husband's company, so I decided to email and quickly got a response saying they went with another applicant.

Makes me wish I would have sent a follow-up email earlier!!

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Job Seeker in Norcross, Georgia

64 months ago

Well I feel like I got it. I'm just tired of waiting. I have other offers on the table but this job is my first pick, and I want them to honor their timeline. I'll give them another couple of days, call, and then forget it.

And I'm not desperate; just impatient. And I don't like accepting my second pick and then my first pick drags feet and finally offers me a position.

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Job Seeker in Norcross, Georgia

64 months ago

I'm upfront so I want others, including employers, to be upfront with me as well. There's no ultimatum about it. It's fact... I'll wait a couple days and then move on. What else is there to do....

And yes it is extremely nice to have options. :)

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Job Seeker in Norcross, Georgia

64 months ago

I got it! Man they call late.

Thanks anyway.

Peace!!

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Job Seeker in Norcross, Georgia

64 months ago

I suppose. I guess everyone is different because I hear different things. I hear that the hiring person will more than likely give the job to the person that seems the most interested (following up frequently), and I've also heard that following up too much may turn the hiring person off.

I guess you just have to evaluate each situation.

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Replying to Displaced in Norcross, Georgia

64 months ago

Following up helps though. It does show that you are still interested and possibly put ahead of SOMEONE if not the top of te pile.

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Allentonian in Boca Raton, Florida

64 months ago

Jen in Oakdale, New York said: Hi,

Just wanted to share my experience and gather other opinions. I went on an interview for a position I really want 3 weeks ago. The day following my interview I sent a thank you letter to everyone on the interview. About a week later I received an email from the leader interviewer requesting my references (which was 2 weeks ago). I sent a followup email this morning to see what the status was-a very friendly and brief email expressing my interest in the position asking if they had finalize the decision. The response I got was VERY rude.-one line stating " Jen, A decision has not been finalized. As state on the interview all candidate will be notified."

Of course I'm playing scenarios in my head like if they were choosing me they would have been nicer. Or if they are debating between me and another candidate now I probably just made them want the other person.

What do you think?

This is a standard response, Dear; nothing rude.
Rude would've been NO ANSWER; at least you got a follow-up !!

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To Displaced in Norcross, Georgia

64 months ago

Well look at it like this Displaced,
If the company is stuck between 2 candidates and ONE of the candidates follows up with an email or call, that will be the deal maker for that candidate.

And they ask if you are still interested because in those few days or weeks it took them to get back to you, you could've accepted a position with another company.

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Jayden T in Alabama

64 months ago

Guy in Ohio in Cleveland, Ohio said: I wanted to ad, but ran out of room..... I am not trying to put you down, so I hope this doesn't come off bad:

It sounds from reading your posts that you put the job and company on a pedastal, where I as a potential employee is lucky to get an interview, and am at the companyies mercy.

Maybe it's a generational gap, or a gap in what we do, but i don't agree with that. I feel a company would be lucky to have me, and if I am applying while still employed, or mulling over multiple job options, then the ball is in my court, not theirs.

Now I agree with this post of yours.

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Jayden T in Alabama

64 months ago

HR Hiring Individual in Denver, Colorado said: I have worked in HR (State) for several years and will give you some good information.

1) Jen didn't do anything wrong by following up..just don't do more than one follow-up either email or phone. You don't want to come off as desperate but you do want to make sure that they know your interest in the position.
2) State, Government, and Federal jobs have a different hiring process then most. We have to process req which take a long time for approval. It can take up two 2-8 months to fill a job and that is after the last three candidates were looked over.
3) Do one follow-up two weeks after and then leave it be. Apply for other jobs like you didn't get the job. Don't be surprised if you get a call several months later.

Jen you did the right thing. Chicago Job Seeker you already followed up with an email calling HR is not necessary. It just makes our jobs harder. YOu should just call or email once. If you don't hear a response don't take it negative. We are just overwhelmed with so much to do that we don't response back until the department makes thier decision. If you don't hear anything then you didn't get the job. I know that is not a professional practice but with today's market it is hard doing the work of three people and being able to follow up. Sorry to say that.

Thanks for the information. Nice to have someone with a HR background to give an opinion.

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Jayden T in Alabama

64 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: This is my query to "HR Hiring Individual in Denver, Colorado" as it appears on p.1 of this thread:

I really would like to see the user, "HR Hiring Individual in Denver, Colorado," answer my questions.

I find it interesting that the HR Hiring Individual did not offer up an opinion about the in office interviewing and then not following up. I just think it gives insight that this person doesn't care, and this is the attitude a lot of the employers are taking these days. An in office interview should be followed up with a response or phone call no matter what the outcome is. Simple as that.

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skin.cares09 in West Palm Beach, Florida

64 months ago

Sent my resume and received a reply from the owner. He said he wanted to start an email conversation and move on from there. So we talked via email for 2 weeks at length several times a day. He then asked if he could call me. At this point I was very comfortable with him and welcomed a phone interview. Once we finally spoke, we chatted for hours. He said that the email interview set me apart from other candidates and the phone conversation was even better. He asked if he could fly me up the next week, since they would all be in town for their sales meeting/holiday party and to meet with the other owner (the more corporate type)
I flew in on Thursday, was welcomed warmly. Everyone was very casual and laid back. It seemed more like a week long holiday party than meeting. I was told it was my chance to interview them. I sat in product trainings, spoke with the other employees. I was given xmas gifts and taken to meals. I was scheduled to fly home the next day at noon. I assumed at some point they had time set aside to let me "interview" with the other owner. I arrived in the office at 830 Friday morning and sat with everyone, watching the clock tick on. At 10am the owner arrived. My limo was arriving at 1045. I was in a training and did not want to be rude. At 1032 I was asked to come and chat with the other owner. By the time he sat me down, I had 8 min to talk with him. Mind you I had done hours of prep work, compiled a full market strategy and was prepared to discuss the position.
To my surprise, he knew nothing about me. The 2 weeks of continuous interviewing with his partner was not shared. I was prepared to get into specifics and he didnt know a thing about me. After the 8 min speedy intro, he asked if I had any questions (while the taxi honked outside). I left with an uneasy feeling. I sent a follow up email twice since then. There was xmas and new years ik I was told they were talking to 2 other candidates and they would be intouch ASAP. Do I email again?

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skin.cares09 in West Palm Beach, Florida

64 months ago

It was a Regional Management position.
I have been considering that uneasy feeling. Its just becoming increasingly difficult to swallow. I have been getting to the end in several interviews and then nothing. The companies are dropping the professional ball with their follow up. I cant tell myself that every single job has the same problem!!!
It was apparent that there was a disconnect between the "good cop/bad cop" partners. I felt that my opportunity rested on the meeting with the bad cop, and perhaps I was right.
I just had such a great repore with the good cop, I was comfortable continuing our email relationship.
They compare their hiring method to a dating experience. I feel like I got dumped. And I questioned why I was flown in for a week long holiday party, but I assumed they knew their hiring process better than I did.

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

64 months ago

Most supposed job experts say it's perfectly fine to call the company to follow up within a week plus - assuming they have not told you in the interview when they plan of making a decision. So if they said that they will be making a decision in a month, don't call before that month ends.

In addition, very few people actually write a thank you letter accordng to job stats - like only 5% of people. So by writing one, you will at least stand out in this regard.

Lastly, most companies don't call you to let you know that you didn't get the job even if they say they will. So waiting for that phone call can drive one insane.

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

64 months ago

Most supposed job experts say it's perfectly fine to call the company to follow up within a week plus - assuming they have not told you in the interview when they plan of making a decision. So if they said that they will be making a decision in a month, don't call before that month ends.

In addition, very few people actually write a thank you letter accordng to job stats - like only 5% of people. So by writing one, you will at least stand out in this regard.

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

64 months ago

I said supposed, because everyone offering such advice thinks they are a job interview/employment guru, but having said that - I think it is still good advice. Most companies don't call you back to tell you that they have hired someone else, so best you call them.

Additionally, for me anyway - I always ask in an interview when they hope to make a decision and then request a time period when I should follow up with them ala if I don't hear from you by such and such date, do you mind if I touch base with you? It works and lets them know that a phone call will be coming at some point.

Only a sucker waits for the phone to ring. As long as you are patient and give them a reasonable amount of time to potentially come to a decision - a 5 second phone call following up is a smart thing to do.

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

64 months ago

Well see there is an art to that ONE follow up phone call. Never leave a message and don't let them know you are calling if possible (call block your number). What you want to do is wait until you get the person on the phone and then find out what the deal is. No repeated calls or further follow up - just that one.

I learned the hard way about never leaving messages. See some companies don't have an erase and re-record feature on their phone system, so when I screwed up on my message - I found out that I couldn't change it and now that message was going to go to my potential employer. It's just better to wait until you get them on the phone.

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

64 months ago

I disagree completely. If they liked you, they will welcome your call. If they had no intention of hiring you, it doesn't make a difference except for the fact that you would still be waiting for their call.

If a simple and understandable phone call is going to atagonize anyone - maybe you don't want to work with this person. Having said that, if you are their top candidate - a phone call is not going to make them shread your resume.

By the way, what are your experiences?

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

64 months ago

I have considered that - you do what you have to do and use common sense. You don't call daily until you get the guy on the phone. If you do have to deal with the secretary, then you will have to leave your ONE message if they don't answer and that's it.

Do you agree with me that most companies will say that they inform everyone if they have hired someone else, but don't actually do that and that is why everyone hates playing the waiting game.

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

64 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Yes. Employers are such liars! But the waiting game is not the employers' problem. It's the candidates' problem. Of course, waiting to hear from a company is agonizing.

Again, you don't know what goes on behind the scenes. My rule of thumb is to give a company maybe ten working days, plus or minus. If I don't hear from that company by that time, I move on. In the meantime, keep applying for jobs. Don't put your life on hold waiting for that phone call.

One thing you have failed to address is the fact that companies have often stated that they hope to have someone start ASAP, but don't actually make the hire for months. So even though you still may be their top candidate after all this time - are you really suggesting that I should wait months to hear about my dream job and not maybe follow up?

By your way of thinking, one would assume they didn't get the job and would have moved on to something else, even though they would have wanted this job more.

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

64 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: As the Rolling Stones sang, you don't always get what you want. You still have to live your life.

I would wonder about the company's veracity if it said it wanted someone to start ASAP but didn't make the hire for months. I would ask myself if I really want to work for that company. In the meantime, if I were still hell-bent on working for that company, I could always leave the job I have or take its job if I were unemployed.

ALL companies hope that someone could start ASAP, but the reality is that the process can take longer than they thought. It just makes sense to save yourself the trouble by making a phone call.

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

64 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Whatever you think.

Well I think you should find a happy medium to advise people. While YOU may have made the choice to never follow up, it's reasonable to follow up after such and such time.

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

64 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: I stand by my advice. I've given my rationale for my advice. You do what you want to do.

But unless I missed it, you are not offering an example of why you feel the way you do. Did you call someone at one point and get a harsh response? Did they tell you that they were going to hire you, but since you called - forget it now? Why are you saying never call?

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

64 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: One final point for you, Toronto. IMO I don't think I should have to call a company with whom I interviewed to ask if I got the job. It's demeaning - akin to groveling.

Once again, my experience is companies have called me if they're interested in me. In fact, one company, which was a prominent local law firm, sent me a blanket no-openings letter in response to my letter of interest and resume. A month later, the firm called and asked if I was still interested.

You are not calling specifically to find out if you got the job - you are calling to see if a decision has been made or when it will be made hopefully.

You have had bad experiences with the follow up call obviously and that is why you feel the way you do, but most don't have bad experiences - which is why a simple Google search will find countless sites that tell you to call.

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Hey Man in Toronto, Ontario

64 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Thought we had agreed to disagree. So much for that.

You do what you want to do, my friend. I stand by my advice.

We are just talking here.

Have you ever sent a thank you letter when you DIDN'T get the job?

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todd zuck in pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

64 months ago

I'd appreciate any advice:
So a friend set me up with an interview with the hiring manager at a major company. The interview went very well. I asked when they expected to fill the position, and the manager said "yesterday." I was contacted later that very afternoon to interview with the national leader in the division (the hiring manager's boss). That interview went well as well, and I was told I was "in the pipeline."
That all happened mid December. On January 6, after hearing nothing, I emailed the hiring manager. On January 8, she responded that she would put me in front of the recruiter for paperwork in the middle of the next week." My friend emailed the hiring manager asking how I was faring, and the hiring manager said I scheduled for the next round of interviews.
After hearing nothing for 2 weeks, I emailed her politely a 2 line message stating that I was looking forward to hearing from the recruiter. I heard nothing.
7 days later, I emailed her again telling her I was still interested and if she could provide some sense of a timeline as to the evaluation /hiring process. I have yet to hear anything.
Is this bad, or this normal in some industries? I mean, I don't think she'd just blow me off since she wants to maintain rapport with my friend, a professional colleague of hers.
Any thoughts are most welcome.

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todd zuck in pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

64 months ago

I really appreciate your thoughts! thank you.
It just seems strange that if this were just a courtesy interview, she wouldn't just give me some abrupt comment to cut me off at this point, given that she's gonna obviously speak with my friend again about it. If it was in fact just a courtesy then I'd think she'd just cut it off with me and tell him it's not working out.
(Also, my friend has introduced 2 other people to this company and they both received offers eventually).

Again, any comments are greatly welcomed.

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Job Seeker in Kansas City in Kansas City, Missouri

63 months ago

HR Hiring Individual in Denver, Colorado said: I have worked in HR (State) for several years and will give you some good information.

1) Jen didn't do anything wrong by following up..just don't do more than one follow-up either email or phone. You don't want to come off as desperate but you do want to make sure that they know your interest in the position.
2) State, Government, and Federal jobs have a different hiring process then most. We have to process req which take a long time for approval. It can take up two 2-8 months to fill a job and that is after the last three candidates were looked over.
3) Do one follow-up two weeks after and then leave it be. Apply for other jobs like you didn't get the job. Don't be surprised if you get a call several months later.

Jen you did the right thing. Chicago Job Seeker you already followed up with an email calling HR is not necessary. It just makes our jobs harder. YOu should just call or email once. If you don't hear a response don't take it negative. We are just overwhelmed with so much to do that we don't response back until the department makes thier decision. If you don't hear anything then you didn't get the job. I know that is not a professional practice but with today's market it is hard doing the work of three people and being able to follow up. Sorry to say that.

I totally agree with you on the Government hiring practices. I remember back in 2006 after graduating from college I wanted to work for the Government so I applied for a couple positions at different levels of Government. After several months of hearing nothing from the Government on those positions I decided to search other job opportunities. I ended up landing a position with an major Insurance Company. Then, 2 months after I started working my new job I received a letter in the mail indicating the Federal Government had selected me for a position without ever interviewing me. I then made a big mistake of turning it down.

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MillenemumFalcn in White Plains, New York

63 months ago

Jen did nothing wrong. I worked in a company where every potential candidate received a response in a timely manner. We viewed as while we did not hire this person hopefully we left a professional and respectful view of the firm. Everyone is busy, acting professional is part of the job.

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Erin Myers in Reseda, California

62 months ago

You know, I'm in the Game myself right now, and I do the "Big Three"....Cover Letter/Resume, Show Up/Interview, Thank You Note/Email.

That's it...if they want me they want me, if not, I'm interviewing with other Companies and not waiting around, period.

First Offer Wins!

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Anon in Annandale, Virginia

62 months ago

There is a big difference between "nagging" and "bothering", as Displaced Legal Professional loves to claim, and legitimately "following up". Yeah, obviously one should never email and call non-stop right after an interview if they don't hear something right away. But an email or call placed one to two weeks after the interview (assuming they didn't give you a longer time line) can work to your advantage. The last two jobs I've had involved me having great interviews, sending thank you notes, following up 1-2 weeks later, and then ultimately getting offers. People are busy, procrastinate, get distracted, etc. So, it's never a bad idea to stay on their radar screen in a professional, polite, and brief manner. You don't want to get lost in the shuffle of everyday business. Now, would this happen in a perfect world? Obviously not but that's life.

When you follow up you really have nothing to lose. If you don't hear back after awhile either you're in the running or you're not. If not, at least you force the hiring firm to act responsible and tell you. If you are, you show that you're professional, interested, and organized and you get on their immediate list of "things to do".

No one ever lost a job because they followed up in a professional manner. Now, if you're rude, impatient, and pushy that's another story. But no one is going to go from wanting to hire you to wanting to ding you just because you sent a polite, professional email two weeks after your last interview.

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Anon in Annandale, Virginia

62 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Continued from above....

The lesson here, at least from Mr. Green's viewpoint, is hiring managers are busy. They don't have time nor want to deal with candidates nagging them, nor does following-up impress them. In other words, give them a chance - you will hear if you made a good impression. Mr. Green's point about candidates coming off as needy - and PUSHY - is especially poignant.

Maybe you need to reread that again. What Mr. Green is saying and what I'm saying are the same thing just said two different ways. Do you see that? Neither one of us is advocating someone be rude, annoying, impatient, etc, etc. What we are saying is that politely following up can help you if your interview went well. He doesn't recommend calling and I can see that but we seem to be on the same page about sending written correspondence. I prefer email as I think a letter in the mail is too formal.

The other thing you and others reading this thread need to keep in mind is that you keep getting proven wrong. The original person who started this thread followed up post-interview, against your advice, and she got the job. I've done it twice now and gotten the job both times. Others in this thread have done the same thing and gotten the offer. You, on the other hand, seem to offer no evidence except what you think and platitudes based on generalities. Who do you know has lost a job opportunity only because they followed up? Has it happened to you? A friend? Or is it just something you've read about somewhere in an article written by some "expert" who is vague on the details?

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Laura in Franklin, Tennessee

62 months ago

Hi Jen I just want to know how long did you wait to get an answer. I also interviewed 3 weeks ago for a governement job, and I have not heard anything. The wait is killing me. Thank you for your response

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xxBexx in west chester, Pennsylvania

62 months ago

Jen in Calverton, New York said: Just to add an update I got the job! :)

thank goodness, because i was contacted by a recruiter saying if selected, they would contact me to interview sometime between month A and month B. well month B is here and still have heard nothing . So I contacted the recruiter but he never responded.

I have been agonizing that i might have screwed things up ever since. i only contacted the recruiter because we graduated from the same alma mater and I read a few online articles written but this person about how much he loves to help fellow alumnis get the job.

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xxBexx in west chester, Pennsylvania

62 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Did you read Mr. Green's article that I posted, above? Was the recruiter a company recruiter or third-party agency recruiter? According to Mr. Green, if the recruiter was the latter, you screwed up nothing by contacting that person.

In any event, too much time has passed. You should have heard something by now. Forget about that job and continue to look for other jobs. So much for alums helping fellow alums.

No, it was a recruiter with the company and i dont know how you could say that too much time has passed with such authority. she said that interviews would start sometime in month B. She didn't say when.Month B hasn't passed yet. I didnt think there would be any harm, though, because she did also put her contact in the email (phone number, email, ect)

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xxBexx in west chester, Pennsylvania

62 months ago

I think my best bet is to contact career services at my school. they have dealings with this particular recruiter on a fairly consistent basis, so hopefully they can give me some more information/advice on what to do.

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Nick L in Medford, Massachusetts

62 months ago

It is just rude for recruiters to act 'put upon' if one dare follows up maybe twice a week max. This includes 'agency recruiters' that make up 95% of all listings on this board. One is told they are a strong candidate with an 'impressive background' and then never heard from that recruiter again.

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xxBexx in west chester, Pennsylvania

62 months ago

ah thanks for clearing that up. =) you would think they would make more of an effort to contact back. especially since i would not have even contacted this recruiter if they never told me they were going to follow up with me in the first place.

I never know what to make of companies, anymore. The last place where i worked said they'd get back to me in a week...i waited a month and a half before hearing from them again.

My school told me they would put me in contact with the company recruiter who regularly recruits at my school...which turns out to be the same recruiter. So, we'll see...

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Once again, companies waste no time in contacting candidates with whom they want to follow up. That is my experience based on nearly forty years in the workforce (thirty-two years full time since college) and having applied for and held several jobs in three industries during that period. Further, you noted it is now Month B. Assuming you mean actual calendar months and the current month is Month B, half of Month B has passed. You wrote that you contacted the recruiter and he never responded - your words. That is how I can say too much time has passed without a response with such authority.

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BurnedoutRN in Atlanta, Georgia

62 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Companies are supposed to be professional and respond to candidates timely. Candidate treatment is supposed to be professional and respectful.

Nonetheless, bottom line, companies don't like candidates bothering them and nagging them after interviews.

No, they don't. My family is pressuring me to send another e-mail to the hiring manager who turned me down flat for a job which has been reposted for the third time in as many months. It was made clear to me that they did not require the skills of a professional to do this job, even though I made it equally clear to them how much I wanted it and that I was willing to do it for less money. Nothing I do or say is going to make them change their minds, and I am not going to give them (or anyone else, for that matter), the satisfaction of thinking that they have made a beggar out of me. I've never been (and won't be) that desperate...or sorry.

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xxBexx in west chester, Pennsylvania

62 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said:

That said, except for the obvious reason why one isn't called back - that the employer liked other candidates better - determining why an employer has not called is problematical. Candidates are on the outside looking in. Unless one has a mole within the company, no one knows what is going on therein.

thats actually what i thought, too! but is too naive to think that he wouldve told me that?

[quote]

It's all very frustrating and agonizing. I know. It also sucks not to receive a response to a followup. In the OP, Jen's, case, above, at least she heard back from her government hiring manager. As I suggested, above, you should continue to look for other jobs. IMO I don't feel another followup will help you, but if you feel compelled to follow up again, you could try Mr. Green's idea and send the recruiter a letter by mail.

no way. Im not contacting again. with exception of what my school is doing for me, i'm not doing anything else. best just to wait it out. and I am def looking for other jobs. I'm not going to stop looking until I actually get hired and have completed my first day at the new company...since hiring companies are so fickle these days even after getting an offer letter one cant be too sure

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xxBexx in west chester, Pennsylvania

62 months ago

Nick L in Medford, Massachusetts said: It is just rude for recruiters to act 'put upon' if one dare follows up maybe twice a week max. This includes 'agency recruiters' that make up 95% of all listings on this board. One is told they are a strong candidate with an 'impressive background' and then never heard from that recruiter again.

im confused. how often are we suppossed to keep in contact with recruiters. maybe that is partly my fault why I am in this predicament. the recruiter emailed me in January and told me they'd be in touch Feb/March and I never thought to follow up every week because they told me that *they* would be in touch. I didnt want to harass them.

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xxBexx in west chester, Pennsylvania

62 months ago

what page is Mr.Green's advice? I just remembered that I received an email from the assistant of the hiring manager for a position I had applied to. This was back in late January and I was told that they would keep the position open until mid Feb. By Feb 15, the hiring managers would contact the qualified applicants but whether one was selected or not, we would definietly all be hearing back. would it be annoying for me to follow through? I obviously dont think I got it (as its one month after the closing date) but would it hurt to follow up?

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Erin Myers in Reseda, California

62 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: I posted Mr. Green's article in its entirety on page 3. Here's a link to his article:

I think you are dwelling too much on this company, especially considering you haven't even been interviewed. IMO you should concentrate more on digging up new leads and following up on them.

I agree. I made the mistake a couple of weeks ago, since I had had 4 Interviews within a week and a half's time, to assume that 1 of those 4 would "pan out". Now, those were the 1st Interviews that I had had, in almost a year's time, and I was interviewing badly...offering up way too much info, nervously repeating myself, not dressing appropriately, etc. NONE of those Jobs "panned out" but yet, I waited for over a week and wasted valuable time. NOW, I spend my "down-time" at home sending out Management Resumes and brushing up on my Interviewing skills by reading Articles online on "how" to Interview. I also did a FULL re-write of my Resume and Cover Letter, and bought a newer suit that fit me better and was more stylish (old one was over 5 years old and well-worn). I also decided at this time, not to undersell myself or my skill-set, no matter how "general" the Job was, whether it was back in Management or not. Since I have more Interviews this week, I'm letting those cycle-through...and THEN I'm getting out there and banging on doors..you HAVE to MAKE JOB HUNTING a full-time Job.

First Offer wins, and you need to have several Offers "working" at once, because who knows if any of them will follow-through. :)

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xxBexx in west chester, Pennsylvania

62 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: I posted Mr. Green's article in its entirety on page 3. Here's a link to his article:

www.jobsearchinfo.com/tip49.htm

Here again, you've been advised about the perils of following up. You had said you would work with your school's placement office because it has had dealings with that recruiter. I thought that was a good idea. Further, according to your post, above, you haven't even been interviewed! IMO a second followup without any response and not even being interviewed is pushing it big time.

I think you are dwelling too much on this company, especially considering you haven't even been interviewed. IMO you should concentrate more on digging up new leads and following up on them.

what do i do, displaced? should I tell the school to put me with a different recruiter? Tell them that I changed my mind, I'll just wait for the recruiter to get back to me as I already contacted her? You're right...I'm going to look annoying!!

I had no idea they'd place me with her...my boyfriend's sister is a recruiter at this company, as well, but she's no help since she doesn't seem to know *anything* about this recruiter or this branch (she told me every branch might as well be a different company).

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xxBexx in west chester, Pennsylvania

62 months ago

xxBexx in west chester, Pennsylvania said: what page is Mr.Green's advice? I just remembered that I received an email from the assistant of the hiring manager for a position I had applied to. This was back in late January and I was told that they would keep the position open until mid Feb. By Feb 15, the hiring managers would contact the qualified applicants but whether one was selected or not, we would definietly all be hearing back. would it be annoying for me to follow through? I obviously dont think I got it (as its one month after the closing date) but would it hurt to follow up?

oops! meant to clarify that this is a different company...this is *not* the same company that I sent a follow up to and the one where my school is putting me in contact with a recruiter. the one I followed up on is a major company.

The one I didnt follow up on is a university (not sure if that makes much of a difference)? I need advice as to whether or not I should follow up with this second company (the one who said theyd contact no matter what). And just to clarify, my boyfriend's sister is a recruiter at first company (the one where I sent the follow up to). she cant help me, though.

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xxBexx in west chester, Pennsylvania

62 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: No......just continue working with your school's placement office as you decided to do, above. I suggest again - do NOT send a second followup to that recruiter, ESPECIALLY considering you have not been invited to interview. Don't forget - legions of other people, and maybe from your school, have also applied to this company. Is this company the only one to which you have applied? Surely other companies look for folks with your quals. You should channel your energies toward applying to those companies. Or are you simply hanging your hat on the recruiter being an alum of you school and hoping he'll help you? If that is the case, and take it from someone is who much older than you, I'm sure, that is not much of a basis upon which to base your hopes.

Thank you for your response, Displaced. You prob did more to help me than my own suppossed mentor-lol. No, I applied to so many companies...easliy sent out over 150 applications between now and Jan 2010. But this company is my favorite. I thought I had a shot because they tried to recruit me in college (as an intern) but I didn't bother with them because if I would have interned with them, my department wouldn't give me academic credit (as the company isn't in the "right" industry, according to my academic advisor). I also thought I had a shot because out of all the companies I've applied to, they're the only ones who actually seemed to have taken an interest in me (a recruiter contacted me via LinkedIn), then when I applied, a real recruiter actually followed up with me. The other companies pretty much just ignored me...didn't even bother to send me a rejection letter.

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