Is there a Job Description that I can put on my resume for a "Stay-at-home mom?"

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

83 months ago

A stay at home mom is not a job - sorry, but to the point. Years ago the term homemaker was used.

I would list your jobs in dated order. Then have a section for qualifications or experience, and list the things you have done that pertain to the job market (such as scheduling appointments, budget management, bill payment).

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

80 months ago

I don't want to sound mean - but don't try to give yourself more credibility than you have. You have children and stayed at home. Period. Don't give yourself glory for the so-called sacrifices you made.

We all balance checkbooks. We all have to maintain our homes. We all play psychiatrist at some point or another, whether it be a sister, friend, or a child.

A Stay-At-Home-Mom is more than a full time job requiring incredible, long-term self sacrifice, commitment, patience, stamina, adaptability to change and a multitude of valuable, marketable skills such as the following adapted from the top ten listed by "salary.com": Chief Executive Officer, Educator, Councillor/Psychologist, Household Manager (including housekeeping, laundry, building maintenance and gardening), Cook, First Aid, and Driver. In 2009

Really now. So what.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

80 months ago

Girl, I am about as accepting and non-judgmental as they come. Definitely.

There is a world of difference between the skills provided in the home and in the market place. The skills provided at home are for personal development and really have no way to be evaluated on a professional level.

On the other hand, you can go to an interview and give yourself glory, make your best impression, say how you organized a little league team, or whatever. That is where you get your opportunity to make an impression, at the interview.

But don't equate what you do in the home, which is exactly the same as everyone does in a home, as comparative to the skill levels provided in a job.

Job skill levels are set up by a job description and evaluated by someone (manager). An employee starts at a certain skill level and works to achieve that level and be compensated and rewarded, and to be promoted to the next level. A homemaker works for personal needs of her family - the same as every other mother.

I do not have kids. I am 51 (surprised?) I have three college degrees - and yes, unemployed. My mother stayed at home (but she was a lazy as sheet).

But don't come on here, when everything you have done was self serving, and try to compare what you do in the home as comparative to a worker trying to go up the corporate ladder.

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mary in Tampa, Florida

80 months ago

You stay at home moms can be offended all you want. My comments are solely, you made a choice, to get married, have children, and stay at home to raise them.

You got a wonderful opportunity to have a husband with a secure job and the financial ability for you to have that opportunity. I would have given anything to even get married, have children, and stay at home to raise them too.

I am not particularly pretty. I never even got married nor had children. I have to support myself. I have three college degrees, now 51, and unemployed.

Maybe I should seek therapy? Maybe you should get a reality check. Now that your financial situation has changed, you have no right, nor expectation, that ANY EMPLOYER will compare your stay at home duties to someone who has been in the workforce for even a few years.

Your comments remind me a lot of those who get NO college education, and then spend all their time arguing how they are just as educated or qualified for a job as someone who did get an education. I've heard plenty of that argument too.

Again, you made choices, and there was nothing wrong with those choices. But now that you want or need to work, don't compare your stay at home choices with those of someone who has been in the workforce.

You are all familiar with the term entry level jobs? If you have no education, no college degree, no special training, no special skills, no friends to give you a job, then you qualify for an entry level job.

Girl, you ranted on and on. Just what do you do that is so SPECIAL as a mom?

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mary in Tampa, Florida

80 months ago

Amazed, you tell them you were in the service, on active duty with the Air Force, then you became pregnant with your second child, and that that point you felt you had served your country well and now it was time to take care of your family.

There is no need to explain why you haven't worked in three years. That's obvious. If someone should ask, you just had the baby and you needed to be there in her most important years.

If you're still working on that degree, the University of West Florida has some online degrees. I took my teacher certification course through them. I plan to do my Master's that way.

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mary in Tampa, Florida

76 months ago

Any one of you has a better chance of getting a job than I do - simply because of looks; better looks bring better judgments, better reviews, better opportunities - better everything.

What will get you an interview is how well you put it together. Obviously, no one should apply for a job you're not qualified for - so I really don't understand what this forum is even about or where you're all going. Stay-at-home mother, or no kids, or no skills - you apply for jobs you are qualified for - you present yourself in the best possible light - you hopefully get an interview - and hopefully shine.

I extremely doubt any employer will not choose someone who is a stay-at-home mother if that woman is qualified for the job. The only drawback may be an employer who wants certain work hours and may not want someone who has other obligations.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

76 months ago

Kelli said; "I thought something cute or funny would be good since we do soo many things --" Someone else said "domestic engineer".

This mentality was fine back in the 1950's. It's not fine today. Face it: You are wanting a job in the real world, real corporations, big money makers - which consists of adults working on adult matters in an adult-like manner, who can think.

All an employer is enterested in is: (1) are you qualified for the job; (2) will you make money for him - or cost him money; (3) will you fit in with the other employees; (4) do you have issues that will get in the way of you doing the job he wants?

Again, folks, this is what an employer is interested in. He is not interested in how great of a mommy you are. Sorry if these things, as I am stating them, I come across as harsh, bitter, or envious - but this is what an employer is looking for.

Are you all up to be "with it" for your employer? What he wants is a worker, someone to do the job. He is not looking for someone to hire "because I love mommy's."

Sorry folks. I'm just logical and realistic. Again, insult me all you want - but I sure am glad I'm not you.

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josie51 in Oregon

76 months ago

Mother of 2 w/ 1 on the way in Dover, Delaware said: Let me ask a question? How come in today's society staying at home and raising your children is not valued? Because we are not paid with money? I guess it would be better to have children and pay someone else to take care of them while I go to work to make enough money for someone else to raise them. Isn't that kind of silly? I realize there are situations where staying at home is not an option, but if someone chooses to, why are they be valued any less in the work field. After all, it is a job and a very imporant one.

No one is not saying that staying home and raising kids is not valued, what people are saying is that staying home and the workplace are two different things.

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Jennifer in Saint Petersburg, Florida

76 months ago

brambleton in Chantilly, Virginia said: I love this topic. My opinion is that a person does not have to be unemployed to be a good parent. It's a personal choice but don't try to correlate house chores with real marketable skills, that's laughable.

GO BRAMBLE!!!

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brambleton in Chantilly, Virginia

76 months ago

The truth is that most (not all) moms who choose to stay home do so because it makes the most financial sense if they have lower earning power. Why pay daycare/nanny most or all of your paycheck? It is the rare SAHM who gives up a six figure income to spend all of her time at home in order to not miss any precious moments. So, those who hide behind the thin veil of "Mommy Sainthood" are actually envious of those who had a better choice, IMO. The earning potential these days have shifted to become more equal between men and women and therefore there are less SAHMs and those who would readily accept their position as a 'real' job. The responsibility of raising a child does not rest solely on the Mom, as there is a Dad somewhere too, supposedly. I personally work two full-time careers, mainly because I am transitioning. I've been an international flight attendant for 23 years and I am also a trauma nurse. I have three young children who are happy and well-adjusted. This has been my choice to balance it all and I am good at multi-tasking. My very best friend is a SAHM out of choice, but in reality, she never really enjoyed being in the work place. It's tough out there, period. You have to have a really thick skin. My point is that, there is no need to insult anyone's personal choice, and there is no need to defend your reasons for making them. Cheers.

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vicquefassinger in Cleveland, Ohio

76 months ago

Jennifer in Saint Petersburg, Florida said: If you're not working a bona fide job - your UNEMPLOYED. Geez. Lying on an employment application is grounds for immediate dismissal if they think you fudged your app. Anyone who has been "working" for any length of time knows that.

Again, I don't recommend writing the word UNEMPLOYED on a resume; several posts ago I explained how to present that most effectively. Again, I advocate being honest with everything on a resume - education, experience, skills, etc. - but it is not always necessary to write EVERYTHING ON THE RESUME -

AGAIN, the point of a resume is to get a phone call for a phone interview, or to get called in for an interview.

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Jennifer in Saint Petersburg, Florida

76 months ago

Dear Visque:
When you get to the interview - if you're lucky enough to win out over the 200 people who applied along with you, the employer will ask what were you doing between (example):2005 and now. If you were not working outside of the home for an employer paying you wages, if you can't account for that time, you are going to end up answering I was unemployed. Either you will say it or the interviewer will say it. If they don't say it, they think it.
So just get it over with and say it. Visque: Don't make a big deal out of this. Its not like you were in prison for murder during that time.

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josie51 in Oregon

76 months ago

Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida said: There's no reason for you to be home while your child is at school, and your family can use the money.

You think I'm jealous? Yes, I am. I am jealous of the tax breaks you get. I'm jealous of you putting on shows to glorifying your "family." I'm jealous when you have your office filled with nothing but family and kid photos, and there's no room for work.

Hi Mary,

Let's not forget all of the money they get to go to school. They get more financial aid than anyone.

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josie51 in Oregon

76 months ago

I honestly feel that some mothers want someone to just hand them a job. It does not work that way. In this day and age you have to work hard at getting a job and keeping your skills up to date. I know of some mothers personally that are angry at me because I don't have kids and because I have alot of freedom. But hey why get mad at me? I never forced anyone to have kids. Life is full of choices and so all you mothers here chose to have kids. There is no need to bash those that do not have kids. No one here is jealous. Please. LOL.

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josie51 in Oregon

76 months ago

Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida said: Damn. I didn't know that. I had to pay for my education.

So did I. Nice to meet you Mary.

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Jennifer in Saint Petersburg, Florida

76 months ago

Dear Mary:
Give up, they don't want to hear how to do it, they just want to talk about it.

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SheSaid in Columbus, Ohio

76 months ago

Here you go Mary,
Your statements of attack:
But don't equate what you do in the home, which is exactly the same as everyone does in a home, as comparative to the skill levels provided in a job.
But don't come on here, when everything you have done was self serving, and try to compare what you do in the home as comparative to a worker trying to go up the corporate ladder.
Now that your financial situation has changed, you have no right, nor expectation, that ANY EMPLOYER will compare your stay at home duties to someone who has been in the workforce for even a few years.
Your comments remind me a lot of those who get NO college education, and then spend all their time arguing how they are just as educated or qualified for a job as someone who did get an education.
Girl, you ranted on and on. Just what do you do that is so SPECIAL as a mom?
I'll tell you flakes what (yes, flakes), I'll let you have the last word. Sorry I couldn't be of help to you. Best luck in your job searches for a mediorce job.
I swear, some people think making a baby and raising it - puts them somewhere near sainthood.
Well, I need to go read. I need to work on the teacher certification program that the government is paying for - so I can get a job teaching all those babies you da people are making.

Wow Mary, you sound like you assume quite a bit about the lives of others. You also seem to be very jealous and bitter based upon these assumptions you've made. I reread a lot of the replies to you and most everyone told you to take a chill pill and stop complaining. Those are not attacks merely encouragement that one day you will find whatever it is you are looking for. I cannot begin to know your life experiences but it is really sad that you have to use this forum to be mean to everyone. Stay at home mom is a very current term as well as homemaker and can be used on a resume. And Jennifer, you too seem to be making a lot of assumptions and also sound very bitter and hateful.

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vicquefassinger in Cleveland, Ohio

76 months ago

To perhaps help those who have been out of the "official" workforce for a while (for whatever reasons) - I thought I would share with you REAL WORDING I created for a REAL PERSON who was out of work for many years and wanted to secure a job in a nursing home environment. I am going to include three roles I wrote for her - she was not paid for any of them. When I interviewed her initially, she was full of fear and anxiety because she had been out of the workforce for such a long time she didn't think she had any marketable skills or that anyone would even look at her resume. After our dicussion, I discovered she had many worthwhile experiences that could be strategically, creatively, and cleverly shared to spark an interest in potential employers.

Here's the first experience I wrote on her resume:

A CHURCH (I am leaving the name and city off to protect her privacy)
Appointed Director 2006-present
As the appointed Director of this church's Council of Ministry, the programmatic branch of ministry, provide leadership, cutting-edge initiatives, strategically-mapped directives, and creative solutions as challenges arise throughout all facets of overseeing and guiding all the "work areas" of the church ~ Worship, Music & Arts, Missions, Education, Fellowship Class System, and others. Conduct monthly sectional and quarterly meetings with all the program chairpersons and ministry groups to inform leaders of the Church's standards, policies, practices, procedures of planning events, and adherence to assigned budgets. Ever strive to bring a sense of community and connectivity in the Church among all the members and leaders.

---
Normally, I would not include a religious affiliation on one's resume, but because this individual wanted to work in a "caregiving" environment - it was apporpriate to include this volunteer experience on her resume.

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vicquefassinger in Cleveland, Ohio

76 months ago

Here is the third role/experience I wrote for her resume; this was also a volunteer job with no pay for her

A NURSING HOME
Activities Assistant 13 years
While visiting my grandmother several times a week for over a decade, not only built caring and wonderful relationships with countless other seniors living at this facility, but also embraced every opportunity to assist the staff, the residents, and other family members in every way possible. Transported residents to and from activities. Assisted residents during Bingo, craft projects, sing-a-longs, card games, and gardening activities. Made it a point to never exclude a potentially-lonely resident from an event, a conversation, or an activity. Contacted aide or nurse on shift when necessary to assist any unheard/neglected resident requesting help or assistance with something medical or personal. As a result of my regular presence at the facility, combined with my innate compassion to be of service to others, my grandmother felt more comfortable meeting new people and building genuine friendships with other seniors, and seniors who had no or few visitors of their own were able to feel significant and included. Consistently demonstrated authentic care and concern for the physical, spiritual, and emotional well-being of all individuals at the facility; achieved this by actively and non-judgmentally listening to each resident's anxieties or concerns regarding his/her particular medical/physical condition, by assessing the resident's pain by determining whether it was physical or emotional and then securing the support of professionals on staff if/when necessary, and by following my “gut” feeling and sensing if a resident was in need of a prayer, a hand held, or a smile in lieu of a conversation, an explanation, or a recommendation.

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vicquefassinger in Cleveland, Ohio

76 months ago

Normally, I do not use or recommend including any personal pronouns on a resume (I, me, my); however, in this particular real-world example, it was ok to because of her objective (not posted here) - her goal was to work in an environment where she could combine her faith with her love of people. She had former, paid employment (as a legal secretary), which I also included on the resume - but further down.

I designed it in such a way so that the reader who have a true feeling for her essence and personality.

Needless to say (but I will say it anyway) this unique, authentic way that I presented her on her resume landed her many interviews and a full-time position as an Activities Director's Assistant at a nursing home.

My point in sharing this real-wording from a real person's resume in this forum is to give everyone out there interested a better understanding of how they can present themselves and include their particular non-paying experiences to also launch them into the field of their dreams.

Hope it helped someone!

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SheSaid in Columbus, Ohio

76 months ago

I don't remember anyone on this site saying that they are on welfare. Here we go again with the assumptions...oh well.

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SheSaid in Columbus, Ohio

76 months ago

Well, you confirmed that you are not a SAHM that is not libel and I didn't say anything but what you and Mary have written on this forum. You said you worked for the legal system? Okay. I have never had a problem getting a job because I am a SAHM. In fact, most employers were impressed by honesty. I don't clip coupons and never will because thankfully I can afford to whatever I like. I'm not rich just sensible. :)

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dovelet in Saint Louis, Missouri

76 months ago

Mom of Four in Aurora, Ontario said: Yes, you do want to sound mean, unaccepting and judgemental... Learning and personal development can come from many sources not just from regular academic programming, post-secondary education and specific job experience. In the end, most, if not all of us, work to survive and provide ourselves and our families with the necessities for survival. Whether these services are provided directly or indirectly by someone who receives a salary for specialized skills to pay for the same services (such as day care) is a matter of personal choice. Both have value and all mothers, stay-at-home or working, make sacrifices and are commendable. Our culture as a whole should do more to uphold and celebrate the value of mothers within our society.

I agree with Mary in Tampa...if your resume is filled with crap like budgeting, planning, etc for a stay-at-home-Mom... most HR Managers will laugh in your face. Make sure you have computer skills (Word, Excel, PowerPoint + more). If you don't know the basci/advanced skills in computers...forget it, I don't care what you call yourself. Apply for entry level positions...you've got lots of competition.

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SheSaid in Columbus, Ohio

76 months ago

You don't have to make curt observations and being sharp and curt in the workforce isn't helpful either. I am in the workforce and the way you are talking to us wouldn't be tolerated.:) Being honest is fine but you don't have to be mean about it. That's all.

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josie51 in Oregon

76 months ago

SheSaid in Columbus, Ohio said: Well, you confirmed that you are not a SAHM that is not libel and I didn't say anything but what you and Mary have written on this forum. You said you worked for the legal system? Okay. I have never had a problem getting a job because I am a SAHM. In fact, most employers were impressed by honesty. I don't clip coupons and never will because thankfully I can afford to whatever I like. I'm not rich just sensible. :)

SheSaid, don't ever say that you will NEVER clip coupons. I have had several people that made tons of money per year and then lost it all due to job loss and having to use that money to keep a roof over their heads. They clipped coupons so don't come and act like you won't ever have to. Pride never gets anyone anywhere but a big rude awakening one of these days.

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SheSaid in Columbus, Ohio

76 months ago

Josie51 I am not proud I am just blessed that I don't have to clip coupons. I haven't made tons of money only to lose it nor have I lost a job that required to adjust my way of living. Again not proud not rich just sensible. :)

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josie51 in Oregon

76 months ago

SheSaid, to clarify what I meant: You never know when you WILL have to clip coupons. I wouldn't be so sure about anything. You might be blessed now, but what about the future? Life has a way of humbling people.

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USN&Momof2 in San Diego, California

76 months ago

mary in Tampa, Florida said: I guess I owe you people an apology. I didn't realize making a curt observation is considered attacking. It surely was not meant as an attack.

Vique: Don't try to razzle dazzle a SAHM's resume. It looks silly.

For you SAHM's if my curt observations came off as attacking you, you do not belong in the workforce. You can't handle it. Sorry, but that's the truth.

*************************************************
Mary inTampa
If anyone talked to me (to my face) they way you so unprofessionally do; you would be fired on the spot! {Which is possibly a good reason why you are unemployed and back in a school atmosphere}. Negativity in the work place brings people down and hurts overall moral. Why would any good boss want to deal with that on a daily basis? Your remarks of not attacking anyone are a joke! I almost get the feeling that you think you are better than less educated SAHM's; and on paper you may look more impressive but when that interview comes along people can "smell" your negativity and in the end want nothing to do with it or you! I would consider changing your perspective a little bit; once you get the "Teaching Cert" those so called SAHM's are going to be all over you daily...for they can smell it too!

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USN&Momof2 in San Diego, California

76 months ago

Jennifer in Saint Petersburg, Florida said: Dear Mary
You don't owe anyone an apology.
You called it as it is here.
If they can't handle this forum or critiquing, they surely won't be able to handle a job.
Especially the workforce as it is nowadays. They will eat these SAHM's alive! GO MARY.
Once last remark - leave it alone now. They aren't listening to you! Pick your battles and fight the battles you can win! You and I in the workforce can't win this bunch over.

**************************************************************
Jennifer and Mary,
As a person in the work force... you both are bringing nothing to the table here... SAHM's are tough, resourceful and educated (whether that be through education or life experience) I have a hard time believing that when a SAHM goes in for an interview and is asked: "Why is there a break in your job history?" that replying "I decided to stay home and raise my own children!" Isn't something that and employer is going to dismiss. Whether a SAHM fluff's up what they do or just leaves it blank, doesn't much matter. Taking the overall responsibility of actually raising their own children should be commended. And it shows that financially they don't need to work but they WANT to work. And that drive sometimes makes all the difference in the end.

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USN&Momof2 in San Diego, California

76 months ago

mary in Tampa, Florida said: I would love to see some of you sahm's in the workforce when someone speaks to you in a not nice tone, or yells at you. That's the workforce environment today. There is rarely seldom any nice pleasantry talk. It's more like The Devil Wears Prada.

**************************************************************
And a lot of the time the way you respond to those people makes a difference in the tone in which that conversation continues!!!! Just a piece of advice :)

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USN&Momof2 in San Diego, California

76 months ago

For those SAHM's here is a little advice to get you in the right direction~

Your cover letter is your introduction; your resume is your marketing material. There are several ways to format your resume and it's important to understand which format is best for your unique need. The two most common resume formats are “chronological” and “functional”. You can Google them there are many web sites that offer this service.
The chronological format is the most widely recognized, with former positions listed in reverse chronological order. A SAHM who has not been out of the workforce very long, or one who has a rich and relevant history of volunteer/community work, might choose a chronological resume format.
Other SAHM’s should consider a functional resume. The functional resume is often a better choice for those with gaps in their employment history or lack of relevant work experience, as this is a format that highlights skills rather than specific experience.
If you have taken significant time off to fulfill motherly duties then I would suggest taking a computer course through the local community college in your area and depending on the job fields you are searching lots of times an Accounting course would be a good choice as well. Updating your skills will improve your resume and give you more confidence when going in for interviews. These courses are usually offered at different times of the day and usually only 2 -3 days a week. There are also fast-track programs that can get you through it in a few weeks and then on your way. Another skill is to improve your typing speed. There are web-sites that will help you do this from home such as: www.typeonline.co.uk/typingspeed.php 45 words per min is the average that is looked for. Once you can get yourself to that then you can add that as a marketable skill. I am doing more research and will post more helpful hints soon. Good Luck to you all :)

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vicquefassinger in Cleveland, Ohio

76 months ago

I've always believed that if what you are doing - and how you are doing it (in your life, in your job search process, etc.) is working - then keep on doing it!

If, on the other hand, your way of doing things doesn't seem to produce the results that you had hoped, then a change, an alternative, a different approach might need to be considered.

I see hundreds of resumes a week. They all look and read the same. We are not the same. We all have our different life experiences, values, and perspectives. It's impossible to fit everyone into one mold - to force everyone to see the way we see things and to present themselves to the work world the way everyone else does.

If you are sending your resume to jobs and positions to which you know you are qualified (whether academically or empirically) and you are NOT getting a phone call for an interview, there is something wrong with your resume. It is getting lost in the shuffle; it is being overlooked; it is not getting noticed. It's the resume. Period. (If you are sending your resume to positions that you know you are truly not qualified for, then that's a good indicator of why you aren't getting called).

If your resume - however you have chosen to present yourself - IS getting you lots of phone calls and interviews - then stick with it!

If you are getting lots of interviews but nothing beyond that - then perhaps there is something with how you are carrying yourself in the interview that is causing you not to get through to the next step (that list of potential reasons is endless).

Again, the purpose of the resume is to get noticed - because once you get a phone interview and/or an in-person interview - YOU ARE INTERVIEWING THEM TOO! It's not a one-way street. Do not go on the interview hoping you say everything you think they want to hear. YOU are screening them as well. You are asking yourself "Is this where I want to utilize and hone my skills 40+ hours a week?"

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USN_Momof2 in San Diego, California

76 months ago

vicque fassinger in Cleveland, Ohio said:
Again, the purpose of the resume is to get noticed - because once you get a phone interview and/or an in-person interview - YOU ARE INTERVIEWING THEM TOO! It's not a one-way street. Do not go on the interview hoping you say everything you think they want to hear. YOU are screening them as well. You are asking yourself "Is this where I want to utilize and hone my skills 40+ hours a week!
*************
Great post Vicque!!! Since you see so many resume's do you have any helpful hints on ways to make our resumes "stand out" from the crowd? What are things that are looked at for lets say: HR or Administrative jobs? This insight will definetly help out SAHM's as far as what areas they need to be focusing on or taking re-freasher training in before submitting resume's. Thanks for your words of wisdom :)
Also, what types of questions should "we" be asking the employeer? Does asking questions and getting feedback from a possible employeer make you stand out later in their minds?
Just wondering~

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mary in Tampa, Florida

76 months ago

Hey, you people: If you have no formal education, no formal training (which is actually better than education), and you have a mediocre work background, do not equate yourselves with the rest of us. Education is nice, but I have gotten far more out of my work experience than my education.

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jessi07 in Houston, Texas

76 months ago

What exactly are you looking for? Are you looking into an online job, or somewhere outside of your home? I am also a stay at home mom, and I believe a part time would do well for both of us.
jessica :)

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USN_Momof2 in San Diego, California

76 months ago

josie51 in Oregon said: The key word is make "enough." It does not matter what one parent makes. I find that some women use that little statement right there as an excuse not to work just because their husbands make "enough". If you children are in school, then I feel BOTH parents should be working. There is no reason to remain at home after kids are in school. The financial burden should not lie only on the father.

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HUH...Yes If a family can make "enough" for a parent to stay home; whether that be the mother or the father then why not? It's better than taking a child to an over crowded day care facility, not knowing how they are being treated at that facility by the workers or other children, not to mention taking time off from work evertime they get sick or spring a fever and then staying home with them for 24 hours once it breaks b/c you can't send them back until then. The multitude of dorctor visits, again taking more time off of work! That is a family decision to be made not judged upon by you or anyone else. And to note the actual SAHM's who are on this forum are obviously attmepting to find the guidence to presue other avenues not sitting on their couches watching TV. I make plenty of money and choose to work evenings and be home with my children during the day so I know exactly what they are doing and that they are not being abused or lost in the shuffel at some daycare. That however is my choice and others may not be in the same position but making "enough" so that parents can actually raise their own kids is something to be commended!!!!

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USN_Momof2 in San Diego, California

76 months ago

jessi07 in Houston, Texas said: What exactly are you looking for? Are you looking into an online job, or somewhere outside of your home? I am also a stay at home mom, and I believe a part time would do well for both of us.
jessica :)

Hi Jessica,
I was looking over my resume over the weekend and was just going to update it a little bit, I do this every year just so I always have one ready to go! I work nights and stay home with my kids during the day. Upon my reading this forum I was just asstounded at how some women were belitteling and attacking the persuits of SAHM's. So I responded! I think part time work is a great avenue for SAHM's to looks into. It's harder when the kids a under 2-3 but once they are potty trained then finding part time work outside of the home is a wonderful idea. I have a friend who works from home as a part time medical billing specialist and she makes decent money to do it from home. Just an avenue to look into :)

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mary in Tampa, Florida

76 months ago

Hi, Josie. I know it sounds weird and unbelievable, but I truly think several of these posters are actually one person. What do you think?

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brambleton in Chantilly, Virginia

76 months ago

I used to work at a hospital that offered on-premise childcare around the clock since the hospital is a 24/7 business. It costs $35 per child/day. Employees seemed to love it since they could pop in any time during their shifts. This was a great perk and made this hospital one of the best places for working parents in the nation. Maybe your city has a major hospital that has a perk like that, you never know! Another option is to network with the moms in your neighborhood and agree to a schedule so you can share work/childcare.

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brambleton in Chantilly, Virginia

76 months ago

Also, there are many positions in a hospital that do not require more than a HS education. These are positions like tech, aids, transporters, clerical and secretarial. These positions also do not require extensive resumes or none at all, just an online application. Check online and apply. You can also call HR and tell them your situation and ask which positions might apply to you. The numerous shifts available at a hospital may benefit most SAHM. Good luck.

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brambleton in Chantilly, Virginia

76 months ago

Another thought...you can also substitute teach in your county. Believe it or not, you don't need a college education to sub. Those with an associate, Bachelor's and up would get higher pay. I have some friends who are subs and they go through once a year training. When the schools need you, they leave a computer message by a certain time and it's up to you to accept or not.

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jessi07 in Houston, Texas

76 months ago

Wow that is so awesome, I got to find out about that, I can always go and check in on my baby at my workplace. That would make me feel more at ease. Thanks for the info.

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jessi07 in Houston, Texas

76 months ago

that would be a good job, only it will be on call, it is rare when a sub is needed. Although I know teachers have flexible schedules and get out no later than 5. thanks for the suggestion.

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jessi07 in Houston, Texas

76 months ago

the hospitals over here in houston ask for experience to work as an aid, I guess becasue they want the best, I know they deserve the best. That is why I have looked into clinics instead. I dont let the requirements intimidate me, you never know, there might actually be someone out there willing to train me and give me a chance. So I have not given up. People tell me to volunteer, but I also need the money to take care of my baby. Im a single mother and I cant be volunteering, unless if I didnt have a responsiility then I would do it. I need to gain medical experience while pursuing a degree in Healthcare Administration. At the same time have money to support my baby. thanks for the info.

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jessi07 in Houston, Texas

76 months ago

I wonder if you get enough sleep eventhough you work nights. Do you sleep when your children are at school and then afterwards dedicate time for them? Im guessing that this is what you do. I want to do the same but like you said its tough whenever they are 3 yrs old and under. Mine still wakes up at night, so if I were to come home in the morning I wouldnt sleep, instead I would have to settle for two 1 hour naps that my baby takes during the day. Like you also said, its better when they are potty trained. I am actually going to school and I am going to get the Health Information Specialist Certificate which consists of the following courses: Medical Billing, Medical Terminology, Medical Coding, and Medical Office Procedures, and HIPPA. Maybe after that I can still continue with my college credit basics and have an online job like the one your friend has make decent money. I would really love that. Where did your friend apply at? How did she get the job? Please let me know. All this you have said has really come in handy and has opened much more opportunities up. I would love to work from home and be right here with my baby upon completion of my certificate. You give great advice.
jessica

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USN_Momof2 in San Diego, California

76 months ago

jessi07 in Houston, Texas said: I wonder if you get enough sleep eventhough you work nights. Do you sleep when your children are at school and then afterwards dedicate time for them?
jessica

Hey Jessica,
I'm really fortunate to have a great hubby and support system. I get off at 2am roughly is varies and I go in at 8pm (no break) so I get to do dinner with the family before heading off to the base. So I sleep from 3am to around 8am when the kids get up. Then we head out to our great church where we do play dates from 9am-1030. Sometimes my friends will let me skip out without the kids and run an errand or two and the kids stay and get some quality kids only play time. And it gives me an excuse to get up and moving for the day. 6 hours of sleep can still leave you dragging but thats what coffee is for LOL!
As far as the substitute teaching goes here in CA you need to take courses and have a teaching certificate inorder to substitute unless you have your bachelors degree from an accreditied university, but you are still required to take CA eduation classes...not too sure what they are called but I can find out!
I believe you are on the right path, main thing is to stay positive and not overload yourself to the point where you not being productive. Do you have a support system (family/friends) that help you with your baby? I know its tough when your all alone and you can't get a break. But it really sounds like you have a plan and that is definetly a step in the right direction. Look into church groups that provide free child play groups. Its a great way to meet other SAHM's and gain a healthy support system for yourself. :)

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-indeedhost in Austin, Texas

76 months ago

Hello everyone, This is a forum for people to discuss jobs, industries, companies and such. While we encourage the exchange of ideas and opinions, we ask that you refrain from making personal attacks as well as offensive comments. We also ask that you keep all comments on topic. Please help us foster a professional and informative environment for all our users. Indeed Admin

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jessi07 in Houston, Texas

76 months ago

wow you are a very busy mom. I guess its a matter of getting used to it right? I have my mom as support, she will take care of my baby if I start working, if not then I have backup. A lady at my church will take care of him. I dont mind working weekends, as long as its part time and doesnt interfere with school, my baby, and homework, and church. I like the forums page. At first I didnt know what it was so I just clicked on it and Im getting all this great advice and feedback from tons of people. thanks.
jessica

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-indeedhost in Austin, Texas

76 months ago

Hello everyone, This is a forum for people to discuss jobs, industries, companies and such. While we encourage the exchange of ideas and opinions, we ask that you refrain from making personal attacks as well as offensive comments. We also ask that you keep all comments on topic. Please help us foster a professional and informative environment for all our users. Indeed Support Indeed.com

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brambleton in Chantilly, Virginia

76 months ago

jessi07 in Houston, Texas said: wow you are a very busy mom. I guess its a matter of getting used to it right? I have my mom as support, she will take care of my baby if I start working, if not then I have backup. A lady at my church will take care of him. I dont mind working weekends, as long as its part time and doesnt interfere with school, my baby, and homework, and church. I like the forums page. At first I didnt know what it was so I just clicked on it and Im getting all this great advice and feedback from tons of people. thanks.
jessica

For me, I can not work night shift, period. I've tried it and it's impossible. May have something to do with working two jobs, since I nurse and fly. Messing with different sleeping schedules doesn't work. But then, people who manage night shift seem to love it.

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