What is the use of Cover Letter

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Comments (9)

xxBexx in west chester, Pennsylvania

55 months ago

would you advice actually talking about the company's accolades and why you really want to work with said company (i.e You're the number one in your industry and you rated number XX on Businessweek's poll)...or is it best to sell yourself by sticking to why you are best for the position being advertised?

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xxBexx in west chester, Pennsylvania

55 months ago

Thank you, Displaced..you have been a major help to me on here :)

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ody in Fremont, California

54 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said:
Find out who entertains resumes at the company. Find out the person's name, correct spelling of the person's name and the person's title. Verify the company's mailing address. Place these items as your inside address immediately above the salutation. The salutation should read "Dear Mr./Ms. Jones." DO NOT use "To Whom It May Concern" or "Dear Hiring Manager" or similar impersonal salutation.
QUOTE]

I would have to respectfully disagree on trying to find the hiring manager's name, unless you know someone in the company (who you plan to mention during the interview process) who can provide that information. It wouldn't be too difficult to find out the name of the human resources manager in a particular company, but sometimes department managers do their own hiring.

I think if a hiring manager wanted their identity to be revealed, they would put their name in the listing (as many do). To me, it is a little on the invasive side to try to track it down.

Just my opinion.

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ody in Fremont, California

54 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: That is not what I suggested. I did not say to find out the **hiring manager's** name per se. I said to find out the name of the person who entertains resumes. That person is likely to be in HR.

I used "Dear Hiring Manager" as a specific example of a salutation NOT to use.

Sorry, I took the hiring manager to be the same as the person who entertains resumes.

I have been trying and trying to think of a clever, unusual salutation that will stand out without being completely corny, but so far I have not been able to think of one. The HR person where I used to work once received a cover letter that began with "Dear Master of my Destiny," and the HR person thought it was funny and passed it around, showing everyone.

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apatel17 in Allston, Massachusetts

54 months ago

I was wondering if anyone here could provide me with some feedback about a resume creation service website that is currently being developed, MyJobbert. The site has a set of interactive tools to assist job seekers with the creation of resumes and other job-seeking materials. The user will be able to either import a pre-existing resume to be edited by the system, or generate a brand new resume by answering simple questions and picking out an appropriate template. The service will also allow users to create their own website and email address to share their resumes with potential employers. In addition, the site will be able to recommend certain job positions to the user based on how well their resume fits the job description. MyJobbert will also be able to recommend qualifying users to perspective employees.

What do you all think about this concept? Is this a resume creation service that you would be interested in using? In what ways could MyJobbert be changed for the better? All suggestions and comments are welcome.

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Bluetea in Texas

30 months ago

jean11919 in boston, United States minor outlying islands said: A cover letter is an important factor in recruitment process gives your resume a boost. A well written cover letter can get the employers attention to your profile. that's why Cover letter is as important as your resume.

Cover letters are important if you are applying to Larry's Typewriter Repair Service.

Where I work, they don't even accept them anymore. I think I have written two or three in the past ten years.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

30 months ago

xxBexx in west chester, Pennsylvania said: would you advice actually talking about the company's accolades and why you really want to work with said company (i.e You're the number one in your industry and you rated number XX on Businessweek's poll)...or is it best to sell yourself by sticking to why you are best for the position being advertised?

I know this is an older discussion but since it has recent comments... Keep in mind that the ultimate goal of job seeking is to get the right company to say "yes" to you. Yes, we want to talk to you, and yes, we want to hire you.

A cover letter is a tool to make people want to look at your resume, which is what makes them want to talk to you. Neither get you a job.

While a cover letter may seem archaic, it is a way to stand out from the crowd. It tells a lot about you, and a well written one that points out the value you'll be bringing to the company if they hire you means they just might spend more than 30 seconds looking at your resume. Don't recite what you know about the company in it, highlight why you're someone they should interview and what to focus on in your resume.

So if you email your resume directly, make that email a good cover letter. If you're using an online application process and have the opportunity to include a cover letter and you're genuinely interested in the job, include a resume (especially if you're not an exact match to the position as written). If nothing else, it shows that you're genuinely interested in the job.

There are all sorts of filtering points in the hiring process even when there's high demand for candidates. Don't filter yourself out.

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JD in Yerington, Nevada

29 months ago

Yes, cover letters can be a great first look - for those employers that bother to read them. At the last conference I attended with some local employers here in Nevada, 95% of them don't want cover letters - they barely have the time to read the resume, much less any attachments. The rule of thumb I use is to submit a cover letter only if it's specifically mentioned in the job description. Otherwise, send resume only.

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Bluetea in Texas

29 months ago

JD in Yerington, Nevada said: Yes, cover letters can be a great first look - for those employers that bother to read them. At the last conference I attended with some local employers here in Nevada, 95% of them don't want cover letters - they barely have the time to read the resume, much less any attachments. The rule of thumb I use is to submit a cover letter only if it's specifically mentioned in the job description. Otherwise, send resume only.

I think I have written 2 or 3 cover letters in the past 10 years. Many companies don't even want a resume anymore. Its all online now.

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