Dealing with difficult tenants

Comments (4)

T in Modesto, California

65 months ago

Any and all advice on this subject will be very appreciated.
I've been managing my property for 4 years. I have one tenant that challenges everything. This is a govt subsidized facility which requires annual recertification for all tenants. During the year there are many different requests for the tenants to provide information in order to be compliant. I have one tenant (thank God only one!) that scoffs at signing documents that are required for the program and for tenancy per the property management companies requirements. Protocol communication between the tenants and I is usually a written request by me to them in an envelope taped to their door. All of my tenants read these notices and follow up with the instruction. The difficult tenant I'm speaking of has always used this protocol as well, even tho still scoffing at the requests, but now has decided not to respond to any notices placed on the door and will just leave them there forever.... I had 5 envelopes on the door during a 3 week period. This tenant will not open the mailbox at the complex and only uses a PO box. I'm now posting notices on the door and mailing the copy of the notice to the PO Box as well. The tenant send me "certified mail" stating that she has not received any of my correspondence and acts as if I am ignoring "reasonable accommodation" requests that she continually bombards me with. She has an obvious mental disability, and I've always been patient and wallow through in order to get things done. My problem now is that since I can't communicate with the tenant except for mailing things to the po box, it is just a time waster, and a money waster. I really don't have the time to deal with a tenant that wants to make their own set of rules. My management company atty has written lease violations to this tenant, but the tenant pretends that she never has received them. She's forcing us to mail things "certified" but my guess is that the tenant probably wouldn't sign for them.

Charlie Wade in Bay Area, California

65 months ago

T in Modesto, California said: My problem now...

Except it is not your problem. You have followed both legal and your own employer's rules regarding communicating such notices to your tenant. If she chooses to ignore them, then that's her problem, not yours.

You're in California. So legal delivery of notices to tenants includes posting such a notice on the main entrance to the rental unit. So long as you have documented yourself when you made such a posting and what it is, that's the end of your 'problem'; you have done your job.

So what if she sends you 'certified mail' (is it truly that or is she just labeling regular mail to that or ??) saying she didn't get it? You've done your job.

Since you can lawfully post such notices to her door, you're not being '(forced)' to mail her notices at all, much less certified. One of the reasons why posting is allowed is simply because some people will not accept certified mail. Posting notices to a front door obviate that issue.

You already have an attorney involved. So just do your job, which now is to simply deliver the notices by lawfully posting them on her door, keep a record of that (and signing/dating any such statements as required saying you did), and forward on any responses to the attorney.

BTW, there is no 'reasonable accommodation' when it comes to the lawful delivery of notices to tenants. That is just a bunch of bull. You can either hand it to her; post it onto the mail entrance to her dwelling; or certify mail it.... and that's it. It isn't up to her to decide which method she will or will not accept. That's your choice and that's it. 'Reasonable accommodation' has nothing to do with it.

T in Modesto, California

65 months ago

Thanks, I feel much better now! ;)

Charlie Wade in Bay Area, California

65 months ago

No problem. Just stay within your job and let everything else about it go. Don't get emotionally involved with it, especially with difficult tenants. If you let a tenant piss you off, all that hurts is you because either the tenant doesn't care or the tenant is trying to piss you off.

As soon as the attorney gets involved in a problem, I actually love it because it means I'm off the hook for creating the solution anymore and my workload decreases. And by that point, I'm ready to be rid of dealing with that tenant anyway.

When the tenant (inevitably) comes rushing up to me because they got a threatening letter from the attorney, I just shrug my shoulders and tell him/her, hey, the letter tells you want you need to do, I can't help you with this now, call the attorney, have a nice day.

When a tenant decides to get our attorney involved, that is the tenant's decision, they have to live with that decision. From that point forward, all I do is deliver the notices.

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