Getting out of adjusting

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CB in Orlando, Florida

27 months ago

fighting saints in Bemidji, Minnesota said: I and some friends left claims and got into subrogation. We all like it a lot and even though we have hundreds of files the stress is much reduced. We like collecting money back and there is very little contact with insureds, contractors public adjusters, body shops or lawyers. Just throwing it out there.

Can you assist answering some questions for someone wanting to do that in Florida..?

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fighting saints in Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin

27 months ago

I know nothing about Florida but will try to help. Fire away with the questions.

CB in Orlando, Florida said: Can you assist answering some questions for someone wanting to do that in Florida..?

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CB in Orlando, Florida

27 months ago

The state is inundated with mitigation and restoration companies (big business here)... How did you get sarted.. not detailed out, but business plan, capital? Certifications?

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fighting saints in Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin

27 months ago

OK I am a little confused now. We started a subrogation vendor company but that has nothing to do with mitigation or restoration companies. If you are looking into mitigation or restoration I will be of no help to you. Sorry.

CB in Orlando, Florida said: The state is inundated with mitigation and restoration companies (big business here)... How did you get sarted.. not detailed out, but business plan, capital? Certifications?

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Still Interested in College Park, Maryland

26 months ago

I am in need of a career change. I have worked various office administrative jobs for the past 15 years and my last job ended this week. I applied to Progressive, Crawford & Company and Allstate for trainee positions. Should I follow up with these companies or just simply wait to hear from them?

I keep reading that the work is stressful and how one is not appreciated. I would still like to give this a shot. It is better than what I just came out of. I have a degree and am working on my Master's in cyber investigations. However, I need a change in employment now and in a different industry related to investigations, fraud, etc. Any thoughts on how I can get started?

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NeedingFreedom in San Diego, California

21 months ago

I have been in claims for over 20 years - 13 of those as an adjuster, 7 in management. My years as an adjuster were miserable - dreading going to my desk, dreading Sunday afternoons (because I had to get up on Monday to go back to a hellish job), dreading picking up voicemails since they are usually full of complaints or whining, and in one position, throwing up on Sunday nights. I couldn't handle the stress, and I tried to get out desperately, but I didn't want to give up the decent (but not great) money. I got laid off from my dream job in management in 2009, and I was pretty depressed that nobody wanted me. Then I found a temp job handling auto claims, which is the most stressful type of claims in my opinion. I could only take it for about 2 months, and I just had to quit, with no job prospects ahead. I know it's crazy in these times, but with the paltry salary I was making, and the extreme stress of probably 100 phone calls a day, most of those from people who want something NOW, or with a bad attitude, I decided that I cannot do it anymore. I am going to go live with my parents while I look for anything else - grocery store, big box store. A friend is in underwriting and told me she'd help me get into that. I just don't care anymore. Adjusting is the worst job out there these days. I don't know one person who enjoys it, and most hate it.

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eas in Parker, Colorado

20 months ago

is a sad situation. have been in the auto appraisal buisness sine 73, both independant and company employed.

used to be if had knowledge of job and wrote a fair honest estimate all was good.

now if employed by company, are forced to abide by less than honest "guidelines" or leave the company.

worse yet if independant, forced to follow same disreputable "guidelines" or just will not be selected to do appraisals. if questioned by company rep re tech issues, they generally have no earthly idea what you are trying to explain to them, as they have ABSOLUTELY no idea how systems relate to each other.

so after all these years am unemployed, same basic story as has been repeatd so many times before.

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Just say no in Wayne, New Jersey

20 months ago

Hi all,

When I started at Progressive Insurance in 1997 they paid about 38000 a year and it was easy to move up. Fast forward to today and it looks like the pay hasnt changed nearly 16 years later. Lets say I joined the Air Force in 1997, then I would be looking to retire in 4 years with benefits and making a lot more cash then what is being paid at these companies.

Another good example. In 2003, a field claims adjuster could expect 50-60k as the starting salary at most any of these companies. The companies would then give you a company car, a computer, cell phone etc. which you could use for personal use. On top of that, they would let you clock a little bit of overtime every now and then. Fast forward to today and now they pay 50k for an experienced field adjuster and you can just about forget it if you are starting out..something like 35k. That company car now has advertising stickers all over it, the computer is heavily monitored and forget about putting in overtime.

Quite honestly, I guess if your only other option is homelessness then taking an adjuster job might be a good idea. Of course, there are successful people in the business I know of who seemed to glide up to management fast and now making six figures, but those people are few and far between.

My advice to anyone who is considering an adjusting job is to look elsewhere. It doesnt pay to be an adjuster. Its like one step up from collecting unemployment.

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

20 months ago

It's just disgusting the way companies have downsized our paychecks. I was making more in 2001 than I am now. 10 years ago I made $68,000 a year with great benefits, a 401k and a pension. Now I can barely make $60,000 and pay over $800 a month for medical ins for a family of 5. There is no pension and any contribution from the company to my 401k is questionable.

When I first started in claims way back in the 1980s, I was treated like a white collar worker. I had a private office, a claims assistant, a company car and flexibility in my work day and some authority to actually use my brains and common sense to resolve claims.

Now, after years of experience, I am treated like a trainee, doubted and questioned at every angle and condescended to by a supervisor who is my same age!! Awful situation. We are treated like customer service reps at a call center making minimum wage--in fact it is minimum wage when you consider the amount of time you spend and the high cost of the benefits!! Fed UP.

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

20 months ago

The only suggestion I can make is to network on linkdin. with other adjusters. I got a contract adjusting job handling Hurricane Sandy claims that way. I made my annual salary in 8 weeks. Yes ANNUAL salary. I socked the money away and took the next 6 months off. I am hoping to get more CAT work. There are classes you can take online to learn property claims. When a major disaster hurts, independent companies will take you with little training. It is good money. When the job is over, go on unemployment to live on along with the money you put away from working CAT claims. Then next disaster, go to work again, put money away.

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ME in Blanchard, Oklahoma

19 months ago

I think it's very funny the amount of false info here. Look, it sounds like some of you are just burnt out. I get it, I was burnt out from doing 17 years of door to door sales making crazy money (200 plus). About 4 years ago I took the Texas adjusting licensing class. After passing the exam I had this piece of paper in my hand that I was told could make me $200,000 a year and I could do it in 6 months or less. I searched high and low for this company that had this new "golden opportunity". I remembering calling at least 50-80 IA companies a day. FINALLY I found one willing to give me a shot. I started to dream about the big RV that I was going to do this in. Four years later I still haven't made the "big bucks" yet but what I have done is found something that I love doing. Unlike sales, claims is very challenging. When I was doing sales I never had a goal that I couldn't reach. My managers would set some crazy number for me to achieve and I would do it while yawning. I was still lost in life with zero debt and not knowing what i wanted to do when I "grow up". This New Years eve I decided that I am officially done chasing the money and I am going to do claims full time. This Tuesday I have my fourth and final interview with a MAJOR carrier for a field position. Yeah the pay is only 55 but the company car and all the other perks are well worth it. To all the negative people on here.. It is possible to get a decent salary with little experience. It is possible to get compete against college grads at 40 YEARS OLD with NO DEGREE. When I read most of the posts on here It just sounds like a bunch of defeated people that need to go out and find their passion. I finally found mine! Also, for the claims adjusters that are crying about not receiving a raise for the previous three years... go pick up daily claims on your day off from an IA company. Or go spend your four weeks vacation working a major CAT for an IA. Whatever it is, quit being the victim and start thinking of a s

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

4 interviews for a $55K a year job? Really? Wait until they put GPS and a company logo on that company car and start controlling every minute of every day of your life. Ok, so you're working IA. Great. No benefits, no insurance, nothing, plus you bear ALL of your own costs. $55K is chump money, I was making that 15 years ago when being an adjuster was still a noble profession and we didn't have management breathing down our necks, tracking us and constantly second guessing us. Want to get out of claims? Here's how I did it. Got my CPCU and ARM and found a job with a broker in Loss Control. There IS life apart from claims, but you have to have a plan and an escape route. You'll make more money and be happier too.

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: The only suggestion I can make is to network on linkdin. with other adjusters. I got a contract adjusting job handling Hurricane Sandy claims that way. I made my annual salary in 8 weeks. Yes ANNUAL salary. I socked the money away and took the next 6 months off. I am hoping to get more CAT work. There are classes you can take online to learn property claims. When a major disaster hurts, independent companies will take you with little training. It is good money. When the job is over, go on unemployment to live on along with the money you put away from working CAT claims. Then next disaster, go to work again, put money away.

>>> Jumping from cat to cat, supplementing your income with unemployment and living out of a suitcase isn't a life for everyone.

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: It's just disgusting the way companies have downsized our paychecks. I was making more in 2001 than I am now. 10 years ago I made $68,000 a year with great benefits, a 401k and a pension. Now I can barely make $60,000 and pay over $800 a month for medical ins for a family of 5. There is no pension and any contribution from the company to my 401k is questionable.

When I first started in claims way back in the 1980s, I was treated like a white collar worker. I had a private office, a claims assistant , a company car and flexibility in my work day and some authority to actually use my brains and common sense to resolve claims.

Now, after years of experience, I am treated like a trainee, doubted and questioned at every angle and condescended to by a supervisor who is my same age!! Awful situation. We are treated like customer service reps at a call center making minimum wage--in fact it is minimum wage when you consider the amount of time you spend and the high cost of the benefits!! Fed UP.

>> Yep. This is exactly correct. Luckily I had the foresight back in the early 90's and saw this coming. I started taking IEA/CPCU courses and got my ARM also, which helped me transition OUT of claims. Another thing to blame was BELL VS. FARMERS. Back in the day, it was as you say. We were salaried and exempt, and mgt. didn't care if we came in late or finished early just so long as the work got done. An occasional late night or Saturday was no big deal as it all balanced out. Then the Northridge quake hit. Longer hours, absurd work loads and abuse ensued. Adjusters filed Class Action lawsuits for misclassification and unpaid OT and prevailed with record sized settlements. It's all different now, folks!

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California said: >>> Jumping from cat to cat, supplementing your income with unemployment and living out of a suitcase isn't a life for everyone.

Did not have to leave the comfort of my home. There are CAT jobs that pay very well and you do not have to go anywhere. A little secret not known to many. You need to network on Linkdin and check out CAT sites.

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California said: >> Yep. This is exactly correct. Luckily I had the foresight back in the early 90's and saw this coming. I started taking IEA/CPCU courses and got my ARM also, which helped me transition OUT of claims. Another thing to blame was BELL VS. FARMERS. Back in the day, it was as you say. We were salaried and exempt, and mgt. didn't care if we came in late or finished early just so long as the work got done. An occasional late night or Saturday was no big deal as it all balanced out. Then the Northridge quake hit. Longer hours, absurd work loads and abuse ensued. Adjusters filed Class Action lawsuits for misclassification and unpaid OT and prevailed with record sized settlements. It's all different now, folks!

I agree. I think the Bell v Farmers suit ruined if for a lot of us. I NEVER got any pay for OT although I worked at places where other adjusters did. Not sure how HR came to the conclusion which adjuster was eligible and who wasn't.

I too went back to school. I got my AIC and adjuster license. I now have multiple adjuster licenses. Seems most carriers want Progressive or Gieco employees not seasoned adjusters. And, none of the carriers want you to think or use logic. They want you to adjust a GL claim as if it were a Work Comp claim and everything fits into some black and white category. That explains why I can be rear ended by a State Farm insured and the adjuster at State Farm denies liability because I "stopped suddenly" for a pedestrian. Adjusters at carriers have no idea how to assess liability, review the law or evaluate medical specials!

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: Did not have to leave the comfort of my home. There are CAT jobs that pay very well and you do not have to go anywhere. A little secret not known to many. You need to network on Linkdin and check out CAT sites.

>>> Then you are not truly doing boots on the ground CAT duty. You're doing desk adjusting or claims processing administrative work. I don't know what you think "well paid" means, that's subjective, and most companies don't have many work at home positions for non-exempt employees which is what almost all states have classified claims adjusters as.

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: I agree. I think the Bell v Farmers suit ruined if for a lot of us. I NEVER got any pay for OT although I worked at places where other adjusters did. Not sure how HR came to the conclusion which adjuster was eligible and who wasn't.

I too went back to school. I got my AIC and adjuster license. I now have multiple adjuster licenses. Seems most carriers want Progressive or Gieco employees not seasoned adjusters. And, none of the carriers want you to think or use logic. They want you to adjust a GL claim as if it were a Work Comp claim and everything fits into some black and white category. That explains why I can be rear ended by a State Farm insured and the adjuster at State Farm denies liability because I "stopped suddenly" for a pedestrian. Adjusters at carriers have no idea how to assess liability, review the law or evaluate medical specials!

>> A lot of HR departments made a lot of bad decisions or in the case of BELL, the HR department KNEW all along what they were doing did not comply with existing labor laws. In response to BELL and several other related cases, the carriers took it on the chin with several HUGE awards, so now they're taking it out on their hourly, non-exempt employees. Hourly people are prevented from using independent judgment, make no decisions, are monitored electronically and have their lives controlled every minute of every day. I know, I was a claims manager for a non-standard auto carrier post Bell, and I was one of the good guys!

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California said: >>> Then you are not truly doing boots on the ground CAT duty. You're doing desk adjusting or claims processing administrative work. I don't know what you think "well paid" means, that's subjective, and most companies don't have many work at home positions for non-exempt employees which is what almost all states have classified claims adjusters as.

Well...it IS CAT duty. 7 days a week, 8am to 8pm from my home. Made $45,000 in 9 weeks. Off now for about 3 months and getting ready to take on new files in a week or two.

As a Litigation Specialist III I made $68,000 a year and probably about $38,000 after taxes. $45k in 9 weeks as a 1099 is fantastic considering I do not have any travel expenses. Since I work self-employed, I write off a lot of things-including all my licensing fees, insurance, CE.

Yes it may be a little less than CAT field adjusters but then again, I am not on a roof in the cold or heat nor out of pocket anything. Additionally, I am not in some cubicle having my every move watched, listened to or recorded.

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

And NoMoreClaims4me in Fullerton, I don't think you are really grasping what I am telling you, but no problem. More work for me. I am not with any carrier. I am a true independent contractor so there are no worries about non-exempt and there is PLENTY of work for remote claim examiners especially those, like me who have multiple licenses and years and years of experience. Once you prove yourself to be motivated, proactive and well experienced in claims, the work is endless.

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California said: >> A lot of HR departments made a lot of bad decisions or in the case of BELL, the HR department KNEW all along what they were doing did not comply with existing labor laws. In response to BELL and several other related cases, the carriers took it on the chin with several HUGE awards, so now they're taking it out on their hourly, non-exempt employees. Hourly people are prevented from using independent judgment, make no decisions, are monitored electronically and have their lives controlled every minute of every day. I know, I was a claims manager for a non-standard auto carrier post Bell, and I was one of the good guys!

There is a BIG difference between being a GL adjuster at a commercial carrier and handling non-standard auto. Non-standard auto is the low class of all insurance claims. I understand why non standard auto adjusters are treated like McDonald's employees. Most are uneducated and lack basic life experience. The only requirement is they have a GED and be bilingual even tho' their English skills are debatable. I have known non-standard adjusters who did not know the difference between an insured and a claimant, or 1st party from 3rd party or basic DMV codes.

It's a different World. I started out when companies like State Farm, Travelers had extensive training programs. You learned everything from the bottom up, how to appraise car damages, contracts, torts, legal and medical terminology. You had to have a college degree or pass a very difficult aptitude test. Now days different. If you worked at Chili's last week you could adjust a claim this week. If you were the night manager at Burger King, you could now be Claims Manager.

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

Having stated the above, I would like to add this is why when there is a catastrophe, carriers do not utilize their staff. Instead they pay an independent contractor, like me, $5000 a week to work as an inside claims adjuster from my home...so I guess what I am saying is, change is good.

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: There is a BIG difference between being a GL adjuster at a commercial carrier and handling non-standard auto. Non-standard auto is the low class of all insurance claims. I understand why non standard auto adjusters are treated like McDonald's employees. Most are uneducated and lack basic life experience. The only requirement is they have a GED and be bilingual even tho' their English skills are debatable. I have known non-standard adjusters who did not know the difference between an insured and a claimant, or 1st party from 3rd party or basic DMV codes.

It's a different World. I started out when companies like State Farm, Travelers had extensive training programs. You learned everything from the bottom up, how to appraise car damages, contracts, torts, legal and medical terminology. You had to have a college degree or pass a very difficult aptitude test. Now days different. If you worked at Chili's last week you could adjust a claim this week. If you were the night manager at Burger King, you could now be Claims Manager.

>>> Sorry, but the NSA carrier I worked for PAID better, had more mature, more experienced and longer tenured employees across the board. We did NOT hire trainees. Average experience in the unit I managed exceeded 15 years, and all my direct reports came from companies like Allstate, Farmers, 20th, etc. Management was more competent and the PTO and benefits plan far exceeded what I had at my prior claims job at a "preferred" carrier, where BTW I handled just about everything including Commercial and Personal lines Auto, Property, Marine, Inland Marine, CGL & GKL.

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: Having stated the above, I would like to add this is why when there is a catastrophe, carriers do not utilize their staff. Instead they pay an independent contractor, like me, $5000 a week to work as an inside claims adjuster from my home...so I guess what I am saying is, change is good.

>> I worked CAT all across the country with a Major carrier in the late 80's and early 90's. They would simply pull from a pool of employees who had either volunteered, were on a CAT team, or lived in areas of the country where the CAT had not hit. $5K a week working CAT duty from home with no on site client or PA, contractor or policyholder interface, no on site appraising, estimating or carrier direction? I smell and call BS. You, sir are a liar.

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: And NoMoreClaims4me in Fullerton, I don't think you are really grasping what I am telling you, but no problem. More work for me. I am not with any carrier. I am a true independent contractor so there are no worries about non-exempt and there is PLENTY of work for remote claim examiners especially those, like me who have multiple licenses and years and years of experience. Once you prove yourself to be motivated, proactive and well experienced in claims, the work is endless.

>> As my current position is in WC Loss Control, I know *exactly* what an independent contractor is as well as what it is not. You cover all of your own expenses and receive NO benefits of any kind. Zero. Not an ideal position for everyone.

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California said: >> As my current position is in WC Loss Control, I know *exactly* what an independent contractor is as well as what it is not. You cover all of your own expenses and receive NO benefits of any kind. Zero. Not an ideal position for everyone.

I do not think I said you do not know what an independent contractor is. I only stated I work that way thus OT is not an issue nor whether or not a company allows non-exempt people to work remotely. As for benefits,these days emploees have crappy benefits. The last permenant position I had (18 months ago) merical benefits for a family of 4 was $800 for a PPO. No pension and the 401 sucked.

I don't care whether you believe me or not. I was trying to give information to those posting who a struggling with where to go. I was paid 65% of a flate rate charged by the IA I contracted with. Their fee to the carrier was $350. I handled 200 files. Do the math.

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California said: >> I worked CAT all across the country with a Major carrier in the late 80's and early 90's. They would simply pull from a pool of employees who had either volunteered, were on a CAT team, or lived in areas of the country where the CAT had not hit. $5K a week working CAT duty from home with no on site client or PA, contractor or policyholder interface, no on site appraising, estimating or carrier direction? I smell and call BS. You, sir are a liar.

The CAT did the scope and estimate. I took it from there. Reviewed coverage, explained loss and deductibles, negotiated settlement. (See response below) Not BS and thankfully your ignorance is ehy there is plenty of work for me!

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: The CAT did the scope and estimate. I took it from there. Reviewed coverage, explained loss and deductibles, negotiated settlement. (See response below) Not BS and thankfully your ignorance is ehy there is plenty of work for me!

>> Not for $5K a week, bro. I know what you IA's get paid, many times I was the guy hiring you and signing the checks. I still have friends running their own IA firms that contract with subs like you. Nice try.

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

Nomore: You forget about Bell and OT. Most carriers do not use their own staff. The OT would kill them. Instead they contract with Independent Adjusting firms who in turn contract with adjusters like me. Additionally if the carrier only uses an IA for the field inspections, they still need the inside staff to handle the rest of the claim and resolve it. The IA I worked with offered a flat rate to handle the entire claim and not over burden the carrier's inside staff who were already handling a backlog of non-catastrophe claims and could not possibly take on 35000 hurricane sandy claims.

Believe what you want. I tend to think I have been around longer and have aore diverse background than you, therefore I knew enough about finding these opportunities.....for the re ord I am neither a liar or male. Good day.

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: I do not think I said you do not know what an independent contractor is. I only stated I work that way thus OT is not an issue nor whether or not a company allows non-exempt people to work remotely. As for benefits,these days emploees have crappy benefits. The last permenant position I had (18 months ago) merical benefits for a family of 4 was $800 for a PPO. No pension and the 401 sucked.

I don't care whether you believe me or not. I was trying to give information to those posting who a struggling with where to go. I was paid 65% of a flate rate charged by the IA I contracted with. Their fee to the carrier was $350. I handled 200 files. Do the math.

>> Bottom line is, most people posting here want OUT of claims and in some cases OUT of the industry. Going the IA route may be an attractive option for SOME, but not many. There are "pros" and "cons" to being an IA, but being around as long as I have and understanding the Insurance industry as well as I do, there are FAR more "cons" to choosing IA claims work as a career path. If you are indeed making $5K a week working from home, you are BY FAR the EXCEPTION, not the RULE, and you would do the people posting here, looking for help a better service by being a bit more forthcoming by pointing this out, as "work from home" scams and schemes are ALL OVER the internet and elsewhere, and it's 99% BS.

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: Nomore: You forget about Bell and OT. Most carriers do not use their own staff. The OT would kill them. Instead they contract with Independent Adjusting firms who in turn contract with adjusters like me. Additionally if the carrier only uses an IA for the field inspections, they still need the inside staff to handle the rest of the claim and resolve it. The IA I worked with offered a flat rate to handle the entire claim and not over burden the carrier's inside staff who were already handling a backlog of non-catastrophe claims and could not possibly take on 35000 hurricane sandy claims.

Believe what you want. I tend to think I have been around longer and have aore diverse background than you, therefore I knew enough about finding these opportunities.....for the re ord I am neither a liar or male. Good day.

>> Do you hold a bachelors or higher degree? Have you ever been in management? Have you ever managed managers? How long? How many industry designations do you hold? Sorry, you're the person that's still schlepping claims, not me. I've known people like you my entire career, and fired even more.

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: Nomore: You forget about Bell and OT. Most carriers do not use their own staff. The OT would kill them. Instead they contract with Independent Adjusting firms who in turn contract with adjusters like me. Additionally if the carrier only uses an IA for the field inspections, they still need the inside staff to handle the rest of the claim and resolve it. The IA I worked with offered a flat rate to handle the entire claim and not over burden the carrier's inside staff who were already handling a backlog of non-catastrophe claims and could not possibly take on 35000 hurricane sandy claims.

Believe what you want. I tend to think I have been around longer and have aore diverse background than you, therefore I knew enough about finding these opportunities.....for the re ord I am neither a liar or male. Good day.

>> Sorry, wrong again. The major carriers upped their game concerning CATs a long time ago. Most, if not all, have dedicated CAT teams strategically placed across the entire nation. I know many people who do this AS EMPLOYEES, full time! We've all seen the commercials with the mobile field offices, emergency response teams, etc, etc, and these depictions are TRUE! These employee CAT team folks CAN make good money in some cases $100K + a year, but again, there will be a work/life balance that will emphasize the "work" side, and it's NOT FOR EVERYBODY!

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California said: >> Bottom line is, most people posting here want OUT of claims and in some cases OUT of the industry. Going the IA route may be an attractive option for SOME, but not many. There are "pros" and "cons" to being an IA, but being around as long as I have and understanding the Insurance industry as well as I do, there are FAR more "cons" to choosing IA claims work as a career path. If you are indeed making $5K a week working from home, you are BY FAR the EXCEPTION, not the RULE, and you would do the people posting here, looking for help a better service by being a bit more forthcoming by pointing this out, as "work from home" scams and schemes are ALL OVER the internet and elsewhere, and it's 99% BS.

My God you are a hostile person. You are correct under "normal" situations IAs make on average $65k to $80k in southern CA. $5k a week is for CAT pay. Carriers will pay IAs a flat rate usually anywhere from $350 and up. It mostly depends on the total value of the claim.
Plus paying an IA is an EXP and a write off unlike paying a payroll.

I am not promoting any "work at home" scam. I am offering suggestions to people who have a claims background but like me became disgusted with companies and lack of pay. This is an alternative. All I am saying.

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: My God you are a hostile person. You are correct under "normal" situations IAs make on average $65k to $80k in southern CA. $5k a week is for CAT pay. Carriers will pay IAs a flat rate usually anywhere from $350 and up. It mostly depends on the total value of the claim.
Plus paying an IA is an EXP and a write off unlike paying a payroll.

I am not promoting any "work at home" scam. I am offering suggestions to people who have a claims background but like me became disgusted with companies and lack of pay. This is an alternative. All I am saying.

>> It IS an alternative, but it is NOT realistic for everyone! It is easier for an IA to transition to Ins. carrier employment than it is the other way around. At my last job, many of my team adjusters had been IA's in their prior lives, and they made GREAT employees. Every single one of them were happy to have made that move! Being an IA has a lot of down side and uncertainty and you fail to point that out, that's what I'm trying to state here.

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California said: >> Do you hold a bachelors or higher degree? Have you ever been in management? Have you ever managed managers? How long? How many industry designations do you hold? Sorry, you're the person that's still schlepping claims, not me. I've known people like you my entire career, and fired even more.

Managed, been in the field, worked for large international carriers, been an independent adjuster, a TPA , handled public entity, self insureds, excess claims, death claims, employers legal liability, malpractice., D & O, CD.....all sorts of things. I have Professional designations:AIC, a law degree, a law license, adjuster licenses.

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California said: >>> Lady, you could NEVER do my current job. Not in a million years... The kinds clients, risks and exposures I deal with would blow your mind!

If your job is so great and wonderful, why are you here?

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

FYI, here's a few of the things I might deal with in a week. DOT, Trucking, warehousing, light and heavy industrial, HealthCare and surgery centers, medical offices, Veterinary offices, Ergonomics, Industrial Hygiene, Food Safety, Asbestos, Nanostructures, NFPA, Fire detection and suppression systems, USLW&H, FECA, FELA, Port Operations, Aviation, Intermodal Freight handling/Bulk Break, Federal OSHA, CAL-OSHA, PEO's Staffing firms, logistics, Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Captives, Micro Captives, Rent-A-Captives, Reinsurance, Foodservice, Hospitality, etc. etc. etc! There IS life after claims, and I'm loving every minute of it!

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: If your job is so great and wonderful, why are you here?

>> Trying to HELP people get OUT of claims, by showing them how it can be done! Is it easy? NO! You have to have a PLAN, and do something toward executing that plan EVERY DAY! Nobody has to continue to suffer working a job they hate!

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nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: Managed, been in the field, worked for large international carriers, been an independent adjuster, a TPA , handled public entity, self insureds, excess claims, death claims, employers legal liability, malpractice., D & O, CD.....all sorts of things. I have Professional designations:AIC, a law degree, a law license, adjuster licenses.

>> Why aren't you practicing law??? Hmmmm.. It costs a LOT to go to law school and pass the bar.. Why not open your own law firm? Hmmm...

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

nomoreclaims4me in Fullerton, California said: >> Why aren't you practicing law??? Hmmmm.. It costs a LOT to go to law school and pass the bar.. Why not open your own law firm? Hmmm...

You have no idea what it costs to be in business especially in an unfriendly business climate as California. Since I am nearing retirement age, opening my own firm would be stupid. I did work as house counsel but attorneys lke everyone else got downsized or let go when mergers happened.

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nomorelcaims4me in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: You have no idea what it costs to be in business especially in an unfriendly business climate as California. Since I am nearing retirement age, opening my own firm would be stupid. I did work as house counsel but attorneys lke everyone else got downsized or let go when mergers happened.

>> I've lived in California since 1967, and the bulk of my client base is here too, so I do indeed know that it is a difficult business environment. I also know that people here live, thrive, profit, and do just fine, and that some do not. Mergers happen. I got caught up in TWO. In both cases, I picked myself up, dusted myself off and kept going. Evolve or die. It's that simple. Sorry about your bad career choices. Enjoy your retirement.

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

nomorelcaims4me in Fullerton, California said: >> I've lived in California since 1967, and the bulk of my client base is here too, so I do indeed know that it is a difficult business environment. I also know that people here live, thrive, profit, and do just fine, and that some do not. Mergers happen. I got caught up in TWO. In both cases, I picked myself up, dusted myself off and kept going. Evolve or die. It's that simple. Sorry about your bad career choices. Enjoy your retirement.

Well....I was born here and have seen the state go from one of being the Golden state to one with a falling down and broke system. So whatever YOU think advantages you have gain, I doubt. You are merely receiving the crumbs of what was already devoured by those before you.

I never said I made bad career choices or that I am retired. I am near retirement thus it would be insane to spend my assests and investments on opening a law practice. Not every attorney wants to have her own firm.

Your "I am better than you attitude" is exactly why the insurance industry sucks thses days along with the rest of corporate America. You are the reason I work as an independent so I can tell talking heads like you to pound sand!

If anyone is truly interested in learning how to work CAT claims as a field person or a a remote file reviewer or examiner, check out catadjuster.net. Free yourself from working under so-called "managers" who could not lead the fry crew at McDonalds let alone mentor you.

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HahA

19 months ago

You had me until Catadjuster.net. This people are the most negative people in the world. They think the only way to get into claims is to ride around with an adjuster for two years.. Wake up its 2013. Thy crap might have worked in the 90s but not now.

I believe you do make 5000.00 a week doing reviewing considering I have two friends that make just as much but are busy all year. They got lucky and found the right IA company and they have the experience to back it up. That money is real but less than 1 percent or all reviewers will ever find an opportunity like that. There will be a day when that money goes away. We all know that true field IA's use to make bank. When computers took over the pay went down. In the field side there are guys doing 300,000 a year but you have to be super experienced and very lucky that you started ground floor with a company like Pilot, Eberls, etc etc.

Please do not lie or disclose reality about what someone is really expected to make.

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Anotherone in Los Angeles, California

19 months ago

HahA said: You had me until Catadjuster.net. This people are the most negative people in the world. They think the only way to get into claims is to ride around with an adjuster for two years.. >>>>>>

Ahh...You really are not familar with the site are yo? It is a job listing site like indeed. I have gotten 3 contracts, paying jobs from the site and 8 other leads.

Anyway.... done with this nonsense. There is work out there, using your skills while not having to be at the mercy of downsizing, idiotic corporate rules or souless managers. You just need to be creative and not affraid to trust yourself.

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patrick.harrington@att.net in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: Well....I was born here and have seen the state go from one of being the Golden state to one with a falling down and broke system. So whatever YOU think advantages you have gain, I doubt. You are merely receiving the crumbs of what was already devoured by those before you.

I never said I made bad career choices or that I am retired. I am near retirement thus it would be insane to spend my assests and investments on opening a law practice. Not every attorney wants to have her own firm.

Your "I am better than you attitude" is exactly why the insurance industry sucks thses days along with the rest of corporate America. You are the reason I work as an independent so I can tell talking heads like you to pound sand!

If anyone is truly interested in learning how to work CAT claims as a field person or a a remote file reviewer or examiner, check out catadjuster.net. Free yourself from working under so-called "managers" who could not lead the fry crew at McDonalds let alone mentor you.

>> Claims chump dummy. No wonder why claims people ride in the back of the company bus. Strike a nerve? The truth sucks sometimes..

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patrick.harrington@att.net in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said:

Claims drone dummy. No marketable skills, no future. Can only do what you're told to do. A mindless drone...$8-$10 an hour tops. Expendable. NEXT!

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patrick.harrington@att.net in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

HahA said: You had me until Catadjuster.net. This people are the most negative people in the world. They think the only way to get into claims is to ride around with an adjuster for two years.. Wake up its 2013. Thy crap might have worked in the 90s but not now.

I believe you do make 5000.00 a week doing reviewing considering I have two friends that make just as much but are busy all year. They got lucky and found the right IA company and they have the experience to back it up. That money is real but less than 1 percent or all reviewers will ever find an opportunity like that. There will be a day when that money goes away. We all know that true field IA's use to make bank. When computers took over the pay went down. In the field side there are guys doing 300,000 a year but you have to be super experienced and very lucky that you started ground floor with a company like Pilot, Eberls, etc etc.

Please do not lie or disclose reality about what someone is really expected to make.

>> Pilot? LOL!!! You must be joking! LOL!

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patrick.harrington@att.net in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Claims adjusting is a dying profession. I can't think of a worse career choice in 2013. No respect, no money, no future. Claims USED to be a noble profession. Those days are long gone. Don't believe me? Proceed at your own peril!

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patrick.harrington@att.net in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

Anotherone in Los Angeles, California said: Well....I was born here and have seen the state go from one of being the Golden state to one with a falling down and broke system. So whatever YOU think advantages you have gain, I doubt. You are merely receiving the crumbs of what was already devoured by those before you.

I never said I made bad career choices or that I am retired. I am near retirement thus it would be insane to spend my assests and investments on opening a law practice. Not every attorney wants to have her own firm.

Your "I am better than you attitude" is exactly why the insurance industry sucks thses days along with the rest of corporate America. You are the reason I work as an independent so I can tell talking heads like you to pound sand!

If anyone is truly interested in learning how to work CAT claims as a field person or a a remote file reviewer or examiner, check out catadjuster.net. Free yourself from working under so-called "managers" who could not lead the fry crew at McDonalds let alone mentor you.

>>> Again. I have moved on from claims. Those days for me are OVER, and you could NEVER, not in a million years get the job I have and do what I do. NEVER, EVER! Get your CPCU, ARM, ALCM and APA and *maybe* we could have a discussion. Until then, you're just a puff of smoke.

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patrick.harrington@att.net in Fullerton, California

19 months ago

I'm out of here. Done and gone. Claims is a dying profession. If you're in it and you're unhappy, it's not going to get any better no matter where you go. Sad to say..... I wish it wasn't true. You can take my advice or leave it. It's up to you. Evolve or die. Get busy living or get busy dying. Low pay, long hours, constant criticism, micromanagement, stress, anger, frustration, low pay. I've been there and done that. NOMORECLAIMS4ME!

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