Top collections specialist skills needed to get the job.

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Host

What are the top 3 traits or skills every collections specialist must have to excel?

Can you suggest any tips or insights to develop your collections specialist expertise?

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D Lynch in Rochester, New York

81 months ago

1. Control of the conversation. Be a good listener, a debtor will always give you all the information you need. Always find a way to find out where the debtor works if you do not have that information. If you have work information then if necessary you can always seek garnishment. Always try to get a payment over the phone i.e. check by phone then you will also have the banking information. It’s all about the information you gather that makes your life so much easier than having to do the work twice.

2. Never threaten or be a gorilla collector you get more money with honey. Set goals and standards and stick by them. Manage your time and you work assignment with proper follow up dates.

3 Be savvy. Many debtors think they know the laws. I call this the Matlock syndrome. Do not allow anyone to abuse you verbally. Be professional and tell the debtor that you are disconnecting the call. It is all about Behavior Modification. Read up on it. I call this tactic the Sister Margaret Mary Murphy Martin theory. Guilt works. If done properly.

Good Luck! Don't give up. So many bad collectors have made it difficult to be proud of what you do. I am proud of what I do for I always do my job with professionalism and grace.

Oh one more thing. Learn how to skip trace legally and effectively. Do not take too much time looking for one person when you can reach out to 50. Do a little bit each day. Plant the seed and watch it grow into payments.

Good luck once again.

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Inspector in Missouri

80 months ago

What makes someone go into the debt collection business ?

There is so much negative written about the field. Just curious.

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D in Rochester, New York

80 months ago

What brought me into the collections profession was the challenge of the job. Skip Tracing is my personal favorite. I enjoy the investigative nature of Risk Management. I also am able to utilize my Behavior Modification skills in developing communications with debtors.

Your second question: There are hundreds and thousands of bad collectors. You always hear about the bad. Rarely in any case will you hear about the good. That is human nature.

I think there is positive and negative in every field. Your career is what you make of it. I chose to keep lines of communication open and not be a sterol typical collector, thus I have more positive results. There is so much negative feedback because there is little to no training, especially in the third party arena. Most of these companies train to protect themselves from potential law suits. What they do not do are train employees on how to manage and control a conversation. How to break that barrier of the bad debt collector? I receive a great deal of positive feedback once my customers get to know me, and get to know them. This results in more payments and training the customer to pay their bills on time and the rewards that brings to their future financial outlook, and on the collectors side a very happy boss.

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Janna Redden in Round Rock, Texas

77 months ago

I am wanting to further my career and learn more about collections process and the background of Bankruptcy. I have been researching online and have be unsucessful at finding what courses to take or who offers such courses. Can anyone help me. I need to know what college or online courses would be suitable for learning more of the collections/ bankruptcy field. The only thing I could find was paralegal studies...

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Dianne Lynch in Rochester, New York

77 months ago

You would need for find a school, here in NY a two year degree in the para legal field. It will provide you with all the information and courses you are looking for and more. TX being a debtor state is a bit more difficult to collect in. That means that even if someone owes, you cannot garnish thier wages like you can in most other states. Do you have State Colleges? I would start there. Good Luck.

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Preity in Farmington, Michigan

63 months ago

Collection Specialist

Arkansas USA

Need Collection Specialists!!!!ASAP

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curious in Spring Hill, Florida

45 months ago

[QUOTE] "The others I call them bully's work for lost cause debtors and give good collectors that know how to communicate a bad reputation. I work very hard to dispell this reputation."

[QUOTE]i [sic] enjoy working with people. ..can give them finacial assistance and help them out of debt.

[QUOTE]Then you have your professional debtor. I love them. They think they can hide, say cars that do not belong to them yet.

[QUOTE]An ooo I love the Matlocks. People who think they are attorneys. I love them to much.

[QUOTE]So that is why I love my job. I wish my area had more jobs that paid better but I am greatful.

Why is it that most people in debt collections speak of themselves so highly in communications, but seem verbally challenged!? They're "Bullies" not "bully's", it's "dispel", not "dispell", *I* is capitalized, and "finacial" is actually spelled "F-I-N-A-N-C-I-A-L". In case three, someone is trying to say a car "doesn't belong to me yet"? Really?

"To" is a preposition, as in "Going TO the store". When you speak of something in excess, the proper usage is "Too". Finally, it's "G-R-A-T-E-F-U-L", not "greatful".

Collectors - PARTICULARLY of the student loan ilk - you should realize you're dealing with EDUCATED people. It's hard to take you seriously after reading this tripe.

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curious in Spring Hill, Florida

45 months ago

Janna Redden in Round Rock, Texas said: I am wanting to further my career and learn more about collections process and the background of Bankruptcy. I have been researching online and have be unsucessful at finding what courses to take or who offers such courses. Can anyone help me. I need to know what college or online courses would be suitable for learning more of the collections/ bankruptcy field. The only thing I could find was paralegal studies...

You won't find any college courses - at a legitimate college, that is. Most collectors go through a bare minimum of state requirements. That is to say, that in some states, the only requirement is a lack of a criminal history for certain crimes.

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candace28 in Charlotte, North Carolina

40 months ago

Host said: What are the top 3 traits or skills every collections specialist must have to excel?

Can you suggest any tips or insights to develop your collections specialist expertise?

positive attitude-self confidence-competitive spirit-a desire to succeed
Solid work ethic

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CB in Hayward, Wisconsin

39 months ago

curious in Spring Hill, Florida said: [QUOTE] "The others I call them bully's work for lost cause debtors and give good collectors that know how to communicate a bad reputation. I work very hard to dispell this reputation."

[QUOTE]i [sic] enjoy working with people. ..can give them finacial assistance and help them out of debt.

[QUOTE]Then you have your professional debtor. I love them. They think they can hide, say cars that do not belong to them yet.

[QUOTE]An ooo I love the Matlocks. People who think they are attorneys. I love them to much.

[QUOTE]So that is why I love my job. I wish my area had more jobs that paid better but I am greatful.

Why is it that most people in debt collections speak of themselves so highly in communications, but seem verbally challenged!? They're "Bullies" not "bully's", it's "dispel", not "dispell", *I* is capitalized, and "finacial" is actually spelled "F-I-N-A-N-C-I-A-L". In case three, someone is trying to say a car "doesn't belong to me yet"? Really?

"To" is a preposition, as in "Going TO the store". When you speak of something in excess, the proper usage is "Too". Finally, it's "G-R-A-T-E-F-U-L", not "greatful".

Collectors - PARTICULARLY of the student loan ilk - you should realize you're dealing with EDUCATED people. It's hard to take you seriously after reading this tripe.

First, why would you even look up this subject if you are too smart and educated for collectors? Next, why is it necessary for you to bully people who are trying to be nice and help others? So you think collectors are uneducated, whatever everyone has their own opinion. You should keep your opinion for people who think like you. We need to learn to accept and respect others so our children can have a decent place to grow up. Or atleast keep our mean and nasty thoughts to ourselves.

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I'm sooo ME in Richmond, Virginia

29 months ago

CB in Hayward, Wisconsin said: First, why would you even look up this subject if you are too smart and educated for collectors? Next, why is it necessary for you to bully people who are trying to be nice and help others? So you think collectors are uneducated, whatever everyone has their own opinion. You should keep your opinion for people who think like you. We need to learn to accept and respect others so our children can have a decent place to grow up. Or atleast keep our mean and nasty thoughts to ourselves.

lol, this guy was obviously behind on his bills and was trying to hide from a collector, which didn't end up the way he wanted, therefore... I think we should all conclude he dislikes us

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