How many degrees are in 1 percent

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (35)

A Crandall

59 months ago

You have been in the seat since 84 and you don't know how far out you can be on level? I guess that's the difference between setting trusses and making a heavy lift and tearing the boom out. My question to you is.... Does your employer know ? Go ask him and see what reaponse you get from them. Where do you get % from ? It's Degrees on any chart or stat I have ever seen and the fact you don't know how to read chart or know the basics of how the crane works ought to give you a clue you need futher training . If you got any to begin with. You need to kneel down and pray your luck holds with you if you are planing to stay in the seat. The rest of us don't need you killing somebody , It only makes us all look bad.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (5) / No (14) Reply - Report abuse

Cosme Perez in Lake Jackson, Texas

59 months ago

1926.550 (g)(3)(i)(D)
The crane shall be uniformly level within one PERCENT of level grade and located on firm footing. Cranes equipped with out rigger's shall have them all fully deployed following manufacturer's specifications, insofar as applicable, when hoisting employees.

Word for word off the osha site, (one percent of level grade), not one degree of level grade. my best guess is 1/2 inch in a 4 foot level is within one percent of grade, so hold on to your reins I can read load charts pretty good,

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

The General in West Palm Beach, Florida

59 months ago

Do you have a CCO Cosme ?....I take it your runnin a crane with outriggers? if you are then you must have a bubble level in the cab , right ? If not then put a level on the turntable....EXPLAIN to us what you are working with ...otherwise read the operators manual.....

"Well the crane I'm operating has a boom indicator in degrees not percent" <----- well I hope its in degrees!!!!!!!!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

Cosme Perez in Lake Jackson, Texas

59 months ago

CCO. since 03. Working near the water, In the past always leveled up as best as possible with levels mats and plywood. Now the job I have is very production based you walk up to the load pick it up and load it on the truck and go to the next one. No levels no mats no plywood. Just wanted to know how far out of level I could work without worrying to much. Hence the question ( how many degress in one percent of grade ) that way I could swing around and check my boom indicator. I looked up degrees and grades last nite and now I think .57 degrees equals 1 percent of grade not sure thou. No outrigger's on my crane. I have a blue book and need to knock the dust off of it. As far as manuals go I have read a ton of them and took a ton of test never have busted one , don't want to bust a crane either. As far as grades go I think 45 degrees equals 100 percent grade. I was looking for some help from fellow operators instesd I find some of them seem to be quite full of themselves Thanks for asking General have a good one

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

The General in West Palm Beach, Florida

59 months ago

Are you running a crawler? or a cherry picker on rubber? You need too be on level ground with or without cribbing/mats...every pick...more than 1% out of level can put your crane out of the chart depending on your load and boom lenth..more than 1% can cause a slew of problems,..such as side loading..backward stability and increased load radius....Sounds like your doing duty cycle work? have you derated your cap by 20%? ... how deep is the water your working near? You should know these things , your CCO certified......I'm not trying to be a hard ass, There are alot of good operators out there that are not working, who in your situation would make damn sure that rig was witin 1% lavel no mater what it takes...get that Contractor to level it up for you...you do get paid by the hour right? just my 2 cents.......

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (8) Reply - Report abuse

Cosme Perez in Lake Jackson, Texas

59 months ago

I stand corrected. Tomorrow I start anew. level or no pick thanks.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

A Crandall

58 months ago

Ok Cosme, You gave a stat that indicates the lifting of a man basket and you say you're doing prodution work . 2 different applications of a crane. You level the crane when using a man basket period.Not "it will be alright this time"to be out alittle. Prodution work has a manufacture's standard that may be different on each peice or type of crane and they use DEGREES. To determine degree , You use a tape measure and measure from the center of the car body to the outside edge of the track or on rubber the center of the car body to the center of the tire and divide by 90. This gives you one degree. Use the hook or a plumb bob centered on the deck to determine your degree out of level and refer to your manufacturers chart as to structural and load capibilities. If you refer to osha standards over the manufacturer, you will lose. Osha is using broad generalizations and the manufacturer is specific.This is the basics I refered to , given a chart, a tape, a level and the knowledge of how to use them an Operator knows the limits and capibilities of the crane and the proper utilization of the crane when confronted with different tasks.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (5) Reply - Report abuse

Cosme Perez in Lake Jackson, Texas

58 months ago

Thank you Mr. Crandall
I have never heard the method that you described to level up a crane, I am going to print it out and put it to practice. I have always placed a two ft. level on the turn table and 1/4 inch equals two inches out so I put two inches of plywood under the low side and check again, then I'm on the money. At the moment I am on a production job and the yard does have it's low spots, so when we have to travel with a load I keep the load either in front or back and travel square to the slope and don't swing until I'm back on level ground. We do have an old 39T that still works pretty good. We keep a level in it and use it always when we set it up.My main reason behind starting this topic was to get some questions and answers going not to ruffle feathers. Thanks again

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Harry in Bernville, Pennsylvania

58 months ago

Hello Cosme. I too was curious as to how many degrees were in 1 percent since OSHA states that cranes are to be within 1 percent of level as you pointed out above, AND we as operators do not have an instrument to measure percentages, but we do have an angle indicator to measure degrees. And any GOOD operator knows that the level bubble in a crane can be very inaccurate unless he himself set it to be truly level. So other that using an actual level on the upper rotating superstructure as CCO points out to be the best place, some operators in the "REAL" world will use the angle indicator as an indication of the levelness of the crane by swinging around in a full circle and noting the difference of the angle indicator.

To answer your questions, 5.71 degrees equals 10%, but 45 degrees equals 100%. Therefore, the ratio of degrees to percentages get slightly lower as you move up the scale. So 1% would be equal to slightly higher than 0.571 degree.

Reference this link: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grade_(slope)

So as a general rule of thumb, if you leveled your crane to within 0.5 degree (0.6 degree maximum), you would be within OSHA's 1% of level requirement. This is only my educated guess and opinion for liability reasons.

As for your other question, if on the low side the boom angle indicator says 65 degrees and on the high side it says 68 degrees, than you are a full 3 degrees out of level, which is equal to about 1.7% out of level.

Another way to check level, which I find to be impractical, is that for every 100 feet of boom, 1 percent out of level will have the load line hanging 12 inches off center. 150 feet of boom equals 18 inches, etc.

I hope this helps. Have a good day.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (8) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Cosme in Lake Jackson, Texas

58 months ago

Thank You Very Much Harry. Really do appreciate it.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Radu in Norway

56 months ago

Hi,i am from romania, and last month i worked on a 50 to grove. All the 3 bubles were showing diferent things...so first i leveled the crane by the eye, after that i started to swing around and to level the crane from the cab, until the degrees from the boom remained constant,after that i tuned the bubles

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Harry in Bernville, Pennsylvania

55 months ago

Hello Radu,

What you did was a good method. Another trick I would use, is to set the crane up so that the level bubbles read the same at all four quadrants of swing. This may take some outrigger adjusting till you get it right. But once the level bubbles stay the same during a full 360 degree swing, then the crane is level. At this point, you can reset the level bubbles to zero. Just make sure you don't change the boom angle during this process. I find (in my opinion), that the rotex of the upper is fairly balanced between the fully retracted boom and the counterweight at about 55 degrees with the boom fully retracted.

I hope this helps. Have a good day.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

w. clark in Timmins, Ontario

43 months ago

Cosme Perez in Houston, Texas said: One more thing if on the low side the boom indicator says 65 degrees and on the high side it says 68 are you 1.5 degrees out of level ?

yes. you take your change in boom angle on a full rotation and divide by 2. keep in mind flex in the upperworks is always going to cause some slight change as you swing depending on if your balanced heavy to the boom or the counterweight. You want to operate within 1 degree of level, so a change of 2 degrees on your boom angle is about the max acceptable.

really to do this levelling perfectly you want your boom angle at exactly the 'balanced' point, which unfortunately isn't in the manuals. i hear grove for example considers their RT upperworks perfectly balanced with the boom at zero degrees. however you almost never see an operator checking the level doing a 360 degree swing with the boom flat out. Myself I just remember to keep it low, usually at around 30 degrees for my check -- you want to be accurate but you also don't want to split hairs.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Blud Etampon in Rock Hill, South Carolina

42 months ago

This is trigonometry. Tangent (Degrees) divided by 100 = percent.
Tan(1 degree) = 1.75 percent

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Matthew in Seattle, Washington

39 months ago

Im surprised experienced crane operators question this? All these are clearly stated in title 29 cfr 1910, 1926 and ASME B30.5 if you are not familiar with those you shouldn't be running a crane.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (7) Reply - Report abuse

eRIC in Las Vegas, Nevada

36 months ago

SO WHAT IS THE BOOK ANSWER FOR CAPACITY REDUCTIONS WITH 2.0 OUT OF LEVEL? YES I KNOW ITS NOT CORRECTS BUT IM RECERTIFYING AND CANT REMEMBER THE ANSWER...JUST SO ITS CLEAR I'M NEVER MORE THAN .2

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

anotherbri in Bernville, Pennsylvania

36 months ago

The book answer is "do not operate". It is unacceptable and there is no reduction.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Half A Bubble Out in Libby, Montana

36 months ago

Great question. Looking through this thread, It's funny how many people rip on Cosme, and never answer the question "How Many Degrees In One Percent?" If you don't know the answer, and have nothing useful to contribute, then why are you so quick to assume you're a better crane operator than Cosme? Again, I think it's a great question, and a great topic for discussion. We're all crane operators, so I'll assume none of us are stupid. We all live or die by the numbers, and crawlers are never perfectly level. Just my 2 cents....

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Half A Bubble Out in Libby, Montana

36 months ago

For the record...My OSHA 1926.550 is in PERCENT, and my bulls-eyes and angle indicator are in DEGREES.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Half A Bubble Out in Libby, Montana

36 months ago

If a 100% grade is a 45 degree slope, shouldn't 1% be 0.45 degrees?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Cosmo in Lake Jackson, Texas

36 months ago

Half A Bubble Out in Libby, Montana said: For the record...My OSHA 1926.550 is in PERCENT, and my bulls-eyes and angle indicator are in DEGREES.

If you dont know you shouldnt be in a crane. LOL. Haft A Bubble Out, thanks for the vote of confidents. 1 percent = .57 degrees 100 percent = 45 degrees.( Wikipedia ) I have always felt may the best man get the job, I guess if some one is job scared they try to burn you than help you. Keep the pretty side up.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Matt in Seattle, Washington

35 months ago

Let's assume I am a moran. Just saying. If zero percent, which is the same as zero degrees, is level; assuming our definition of level is parallel to the horizon. Then, wouldn't "being plum" be 90 degrees? So if I use basic logic, not this technical crane stuff we are talking about; 90 degrees of level, or perpendicular is vertical, or plum. So, 90 degrees divided by 100 is percent of level. .9 rise for every 1. Not that hard, but I must apologize, I'm just a lazy union operator who makes too much. That is all.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Matt in Seattle, Washington

35 months ago

The real question is...... who can tell me how to read a bullseye level? General . . . I give a challenge!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Bluetea in Texas

35 months ago

Matt in Seattle, Washington said: Let's assume I am a moran. Just saying. If zero percent, which is the same as zero degrees, is level; assuming our definition of level is parallel to the horizon. Then, wouldn't "being plum" be 90 degrees? So if I use basic logic, not this technical crane stuff we are talking about; 90 degrees of level, or perpendicular is vertical, or plum. So, 90 degrees divided by 100 is percent of level. .9 rise for every 1. Not that hard, but I must apologize, I'm just a lazy union operator who makes too much. That is all.

Er, I believe its spelled "moron". Union huh? Muhahahahahahaaa!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Bluetea in Texas

35 months ago

Matt in Seattle, Washington said: The real question is...... who can tell me how to read a bullseye level? General . . . I give a challenge!

Elmo and Big Bird can. LOL!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Matt in Seattle, Washington

35 months ago

I already said I wasn't smart. Certainly moran should have been moron. However, I thought the focus was crane knowledge. I will be sure to focus on grammer from know on.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Cosmo in Lake Jackson, Texas

35 months ago

Circular levels ("bullseye level") and circular level vials. All pretty much the same. 2 inch rise in 20 ft. equals 1% grade or .57 degrees.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Bluetea in Texas

35 months ago

Matt in Seattle, Washington said: I already said I wasn't smart. Certainly moran should have been moron. However, I thought the focus was crane knowledge. I will be sure to focus on grammer from know on.

Just having a bit of fun with you. You're smarter than you think.

I'd trade my college degree for the ability to operate a crane anyday! At least, you have a real skill that pays. College is overrated. Heh!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Half A Bubble Out in Libby, Montana

35 months ago

Bluetea is right... If you run a crane for any length of time, you're probably pretty sharp....they don't let dumb people run cranes. We should be using these forums to share knowledge and compare notes. Just sayin'...

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Harry in Bernville, Pennsylvania

34 months ago

Finally some good comments on this subject and not a bunch of negative insecure ball busters. :-)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Cosmo in Lake Jackson, Texas

34 months ago

have Y'all herd the term ( outrigger take off )? I'm operating a new 90 ton Grove RT. and that term is in the manuel. It states even though the crane is level in some configerations it will lift an outrigger while still in it's chart. Hope my boss understands. LOL. I was told by another operator the 130 Terex states the same thing. Guess they making them as light as possible hope it aint to light.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

513 in Kansas City, Kansas

34 months ago

I have herd about the new Terex's being like that.A guy was telling me was like a wet noodle even without a load.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Rob in Cicero, Illinois

30 months ago

Cosme Perez in Houston, Texas said: Everyone says to stay within one percent of level. Well the crane I'm operating has a boom indicator in degrees not percent. Is it 360 divided by 100 ? which would be 3.6 degrees

Boom tip hight, for every 100 feet of boom tip hight you must stay within 1 foot of center. If you have 100 feet then check your boom radius in a 360 degree circle. If your radius changes less than 1 foot your fine, 200 feet would be 2 foot & 150 feet would be 1.5 feet...to check percentage you have to check RADIUS in FEET compaired to boom tip hight. If you can't check radius via a computer in the cab, check your angle in a 360 degree circle & find the low spot or high spot, swing right or left 45 degrees, step out of the cab & look at your wire rope hanging just above the ground, it should be directly in the center of your machine, but because your out of level it will hang to the right or left of center. Same rule aplies, boom tip hight... if u have 100 feet of cable hanging it should hang within 1 foot of center of the machine, 200 feet would be 2 feet of center.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Cosme Perez in Lake Jackson, Texas

10 months ago

A Crandall said: You have been in the seat since 84 and you don't know how far out you can be on level? I guess that's the difference between setting trusses and making a heavy lift and tearing the boom out. My question to you is.... Does your employer know ? Go ask him and see what reaponse you get from them. Where do you get % from ? It's Degrees on any chart or stat I have ever seen and the fact you don't know how to read chart or know the basics of how the crane works ought to give you a clue you need futher training . If you got any to begin with. You need to kneel down and pray your luck holds with you if you are planing to stay in the seat. The rest of us don't need you killing somebody , It only makes us all look bad.

hey I was hoping to get people asking questions about it, but I guess you are like so operators I met instead of helping they tried to trip you up cause they are job scared. I got my cco now for the 3rd. time and had a free ride to Vegas for con-expo to compete in the crane operator rodeo but had to pass because of work. the answer is 1.5 degrees.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Cosme Perez in Lake Jackson, Texas

10 months ago

Oop's wrong question. for this one ut's .57 dregees.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.