Should I get my BSEE?

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John Amoah in Accra, Ghana

31 months ago

please i want u to come and take me to America and the BSEE program.May the almighty lord bless u.

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Matt in Euclid, Ohio

30 months ago

bissi in Huntsville, Alabama said: reputable companies don't hire BSEET graduate as Engineer, even though some may be as brighter as BSEE's.If you are BSEET garduate, ask yourself why didn't take BSEE program or why your school( like Devry) doesn't offer one.

That's exactly right! Here's an example to back this up, the NASA website has a job posting for a position titled "Aerospace Technology (AST)" and in the Comments section they write:

"This announcement is being advertised for entry level professional engineering positions under various
specialties. All positions require a bachelor's degree in an appropriate field of engineering, physical science,
computer science, or mathematics. A DEGREE IN ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY IS NOT A QUALIFYING DEGREE."
(Note: I did not capitalize the last bit, they did!)

Ref (though the link might not be around forever): resume.nasa.gov/JobToPdf?announcement=MS12D0005

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Mike in American Fork, Utah

27 months ago

I have been an EE (BSEE) for 22 years - I have never seen anybody without at least a BSEE solve complicated aspects of Maxwell's equations to design a new antenna (or make an existing one work better). How many engineers out there without a BSEE know about state-space control design, raise your hands if you can do a root-locus plot? Think these things are not important and you can just "wing it"? Think again - the airplane you fly on has a control system designed by PhDs - for a darn good reason - they know every nuance of control theory and just "winging it" will live your plane upside down on the run way in an ice storm. I qualified a GSM design for cell-phone compliance in less than two months - it does require complicated math and I have had to use Differential equations for some of my jobs. Life (and physics) is not easy - but it must be learned if you are going to be a good engineer. Stay in school and learn the hard stuff - it does pay to know it.

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Louisiana225 in Plaquemine, Louisiana

24 months ago

I graduated in 2008 with a Bachelor degree Electronics Engineering Technology degree. I have applied to numerous positions. If anyone can assist me in obtaining employment, please let me know.

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John in Decatur, Alabama

22 months ago

bissi in Huntsville, Alabama said: you can't transfer your BSEET credits to a BSEE program, that's all the issue. If you have a MastersSEET and want to transfer to BSEE, you will have to start BSEE all over

I see you are local to Huntsville, so I will say that at least here for the University of Alabama in Huntsville, credits from a non ABET accredited degree can and will transfer.

My individual case, I was Active Duty Navy Electronics Technician for almost 12 years, right before getting out I completed my BSEET from a regionally accredited University, not Devry but ECPI College of Technology in Virginia. After I started my MBA/Network & Communications Management with Keller Graduate School, I was done with my contracting work overseas. I moved to Huntsville, AL as I grew up here before joining the Military. Not too long ago, I decided that I would try and enroll into one of their programs. Some of your statements has truth, if I were to enroll in a BSEE program, hardly any of my credits would transfer but if I were to enroll in a MSEE or Engineering Management program, my BSEET was fully transferable and accepted as it is Regionally accredited. I simply had to take an updated GRE and after the respective departments reviewed my transcripts, I had to take 2 classes that were Math based and then accepted into the program of my choice.

So en closing I would say most Universities follow the same procedures, if you go up and not laterally, you will no doubt have to take a few classes but they ultimately have to accept your degree as it is Regionally accepted. Hope that helps clear it up for individuals that were asking about it.

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Keith in Sheffield Lake, Ohio

19 months ago

Matt in Euclid, Ohio said: That's exactly right! Here's an example to back this up, the NASA website has a job posting for a position titled " Aerospace Technology (AST)" and in the Comments section they write:

"This announcement is being advertised for entry level professional engineering positions under various
specialties. All positions require a bachelor's degree in an appropriate field of engineering, physical science,
computer science, or mathematics. A DEGREE IN ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY IS NOT A QUALIFYING DEGREE."
(Note: I did not capitalize the last bit, they did!)

Ref (though the link might not be around forever): resume.nasa.gov/JobToPdf?announcement=MS12D0005

Hi Matt, I have a Bachelor of Electrical Engineer degree from Cleveland Statue university, class of 1994.

Would you happen to know who in Cleveland is hiring? Even back in 1994 I could never get interviews. Not even NASA.

I ended up taking non-engineering jobs, and between that and being unemployed, unfortunately I have only 4-5 years of electrical engineering experience.

So now I still shoot for entry-level jobs. Know of anyone hiring? Thanks for any help.

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MasterTelecomms in Columbia, South Carolina

11 months ago

You all focus on BSEET and BSEE who is better and so forth. The point is they both are Engineering degrees and fields. BSEET degree holders can obtain engineering positions and eventually go for a PE license in my book that makes them engineers.

I know BSEE and MSEE degree holder who are working as technologist and/or technician. I even know some High school/GED holders that are in the field never went to college holding engineering, technologist and technician positions.

As far as money they both do well I know people with BSEET degrees making way more than BSEE degree holders. Yes the degree is slightly different depending on the school but they also can both do the job well. I went to Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) and the ET and EE both took up some of the same courses and worked together. Fighting who is a engineer and who is a technologist or technician make no sense. You are not answering the young person question.

All who have earned EE or ET degrees should talk about the positives and negatives of the degree. What they experience during a interview or when they obtained a job and/or career. Talk about your career field.

When these young kids come on these boards to seek advice show you are a professional. If I was a young kid looking for what is better ET or EE and listen to these unprofessional comments I would think twice being either.

Scientist, Engineers, Technologist and Technicians all work together to improve the human kind way of life. Show that to these young people and stop fighting about who is what. Help each other like we do in the field. Help other get jobs in the field if you have that ability or so forth. Show that you are a professional regardless of what degree you hold or school you went to.

That's my professional advice.

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