B.S. Geology, need job

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wilkeje in Bluefield, West Virginia

106 months ago

mikeg19_82 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin said: I graduated in May 2008 with a BS in Geosciences from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. I have had no luck finding work. I've applied for many many jobs including oil companies, as well as local, regional, and national environmental consulting jobs. One world-renowned company I just about got hired to in Washington, DC had a hiring freeze after my final interviews. My resume is on most databases and the "environmental jobs" websites.

What do degree holders do with this degree? I'm currently a part-time bank teller. I need help.

I'm in the same boat - BS in geology, been applying for 7 months. I hope someone provides some insight!

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Matthew in Grand Rapids, Michigan

99 months ago

I'm glad to hear that I am not the only one having problems finding a job with a BS in geo. Got my degree June 08 and I am still serving at the hotel I've been working at for 5 years. I've even been trying to get an internship with some company, but you need a minimum 3.5 gpa to get into most of them. I am so in debt I don't think I can afford to go back to grad school, but I don't know what my other options are. The local college where I live offers a wind-energy technician certification that only takes about 26 weeks to complete, so I am thinking about taking that avenue--maybe get the certification and see if I can get something that would allow me to go back to school for a masters.

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Ryan Weller in Sydney, Australia

99 months ago

The Geo job market is a bit better in Australia.
Coal Seam Gas (aka CBM) and metal/coal mining are on the rise with demand from China and Asia.

I moved from the US to Australia for a job logging core with coal seam gas exploration, and hope it is just a stepping stone. I was mudlogging and enviro consulting for 2 years in the US before I came here. Hope to move to something more intellectually challenging soon.

If you can find an employer to get you a 457 sponsored visa that would be best, but there are a few other visa options available too (www.immi.gov.au). However with boom/bust and the influx of geologists it seems that immigration has recently become more focused on protecting Australians, asking companies to hire Australians before internationals.

I only got 1 bite from about 50 applications back in December. Try your luck here if you're interested.

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h6 in Richmond, Texas

93 months ago

If there was one word I could use to describe The Mudlogging Co, it would be 'LIARS!' They lied to me about sooooo many things and all the people I worked with in the short time I was with them were fed the same pack of lies I had been. They turned keylogging on all their computers and would call up people and scream at them for applying for other jobs! I witnessed a phone call where they made a 30 year old man cry for watching youtube videos at 3am when they were barely drilling enough to take a sample once every 8 hours and frequently shutting down due to mechanical problems. Just terrible! I wouldn't advise ANYONE to work for those villains.

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yz in Mauldin, South Carolina

92 months ago

I went to an interview with The Mudlogging Company. An orientation was "planned" to take place the day after the interview. When i showed up, the orientation was canceled and I had to buy another plane ticket home. The HR Rep really screwed me. The fact that they are always looking for loggers shows that they cannot retain new employees. There are surely some big problems with this company. I would advise to stay away.

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h6 in Richmond, Texas

92 months ago

yz in Mauldin, South Carolina said: I went to an interview with The Mudlogging Company. An orientation was "planned" to take place the day after the interview. When i showed up, the orientation was canceled and I had to buy another plane ticket home. The HR Rep really screwed me. The fact that they are always looking for loggers shows that they cannot retain new employees. There are surely some big problems with this company. I would advise to stay away.

They tried to get me to attend an orientation that was scheduled for the next day too! And then they wanted me to start later that week when they knew I had no place to stay. They didn't even interview me so much as when I came in the only question I was asked was "Why do you want to be a mudlogger?" and then the HR guy (It's still the same guy so I know exactly who you're talking about) pretty much hired me on the spot. Its like they are desperate to hire anyone they can get in their office because nobody stays on longer than a month.

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pld geologist in Lake Jackson, Texas

89 months ago

h6 in Richmond, Texas said: I was lured to Houston from Illinois by a horrible mudlogging job from a DISHONEST company. They told me I'd be working with a team of all-female mudloggers. It wasn't until they sent me out on my first rig that I learned I was not only the youngest person at the drillsite (by about 10 years), I was the only female. I quit after a month and the only job I've been able to get since is at JCPenney. All you geology undergrads- DON'T come to oil, DON'T come to Houston, you'll REGRET it like I am right now.

The same thing happened to me back in 2001. It was a terrible experience for me and I got screwed big time.

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Kristina in Ogden, Utah

87 months ago

I am currently enrolled at Weber State University. Originally I wanted to do the AEG degree, but a semester in changed to Geology because I wanted a more specialized field to have a better base for graduate school in the future. I am a little discerned after hearing all your guys stories. What would be a solid option for school for something related to the Geosciences? Do you guys feel this is simply an economic slump thing? or should I plan on something different in general. I really love science (particularly earth science) and have thought about geophysics, even though I am not yet great with math. I have a exceptional aptitude for technical things and feel as though I would be able to handle whatever is thrown at me. However I want something that is 40k plus and can pay off my loans. What would your guys suggest as advice?

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old geologist in Clute, Texas

87 months ago

It has been over two years, but I am still looking.

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Kristina in Ogden, Utah

87 months ago

mikeg19_82 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin said: I am the original poster. I landed a government job at a water purification plant. It's semi-related to some courses I took in college and I like it. It only requires an associates degree, but the younger hires have bachelors and masters in sciences (...)

I appreciate your reply. What have you heard about Environmental Engineering? When I decided to do Geology, I thought it was a great foundational science. I originally wanted to have the knowledge to know what impacts will happen as result of Climate Change. I wanted to mitigate. And I felt the best way to do that was to get an education on how to recognize that. Seemed pretty obvious at least at the time. My brother keeps telling me that I should do this Engineer. As it would allow me to use my passion and knowledge as foundational to actually "mitigate" by resolving those "found" probs. I just never thought about it that way. However I feel if any woman can do it, I can. But you see alot of jobs post for either (Geology, Env Engineer, Hydrologist). So it makes me wonder, if that is even as glamorous as it seems.

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Wabs in Casper, Wyoming

86 months ago

Geology is ridonkulous! I wish I would have done something else in school because being outside in a blizzard and windy conditions sucks ass! If you like spending tons of time outside completely alone, in the middle of nowhere doing things that are redundant and boring than go into geology. Every geologist i've met is old and boring, they like rocks and are excited about reading maps. It's not a fun career! I mean i've found a good job but the options are very limited if you don't have a PHD because monkeys can do a geologists work. I feel bad for recent grads due to the fact that they end up sampling dirty groundwater or doing oversight on a drill rig in the middle of nowhere in the cold at midnight. It isn't fun work, you will be worked to death with no future reward unless you stay in the field (meaning outside work) for ten to fifteen years! DO SOMETHING ELSE IN SCHOOL! I know every grad out of school has the view of an amazing future within the field but it isn't that great, it's a job. THATS IT AND THATS ALL!

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h6 in Richmond, Texas

85 months ago

You know, I'll give you one good reason why it sucks to be a female working in geology. MENSTRUATION. Try having your period while you're on an oil rig and get back to me. Unless you are a woman who has experienced what I have, don't you dare say that "being a woman" is a crutch for a bad attitude. I am not a feminist, I don't blame men for everything, and I certainly don't look for discrimination everywhere I work. I have never, ever, ever felt that being a woman has held me back from anything in my lift EXCEPT for this. And women can do the job. They can do it no problem- in my experience the problem lies with the men who work in that field who are now pissed off at your very existence because they can no longer piss of the side of the rig whenever they want and feel like they have to walk on eggshells because their employers (big oil) have convinced them that a woman on-site is a sexual harassment case waiting to happen.

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christophicus in Irvine, California

84 months ago

Wabs in Casper, Wyoming said: Geology is ridonkulous! I wish I would have done something else in school because being outside in a blizzard and windy conditions sucks ass! If you like spending tons of time outside completely alone, in the middle of nowhere doing things that are redundant and boring than go into geology. Every geologist i've met is old and boring, they like rocks and are excited about reading maps. It's not a fun career! I mean i've found a good job but the options are very limited if you don't have a PHD because monkeys can do a geologists work. I feel bad for recent grads due to the fact that they end up sampling dirty groundwater or doing oversight on a drill rig in the middle of nowhere in the cold at midnight. It isn't fun work, you will be worked to death with no future reward unless you stay in the field (meaning outside work) for ten to fifteen years! DO SOMETHING ELSE IN SCHOOL! I know every grad out of school has the view of an amazing future within the field but it isn't that great, it's a job. THATS IT AND THATS ALL!

If you had no interest in maps or rocks, why did you choose geology as your career path?

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CuteKitty in Houston, Texas

83 months ago

h6 in Richmond, Texas said: If there was one word I could use to describe The Mudlogging Co, it would be 'LIARS!' They lied to me about sooooo many things and all the people I worked with in the short time I was with them were fed the same pack of lies I had been. They turned keylogging on all their computers and would call up people and scream at them for applying for other jobs! I witnessed a phone call where they made a 30 year old man cry for watching youtube videos at 3am when they were barely drilling enough to take a sample once every 8 hours and frequently shutting down due to mechanical problems. Just terrible! I wouldn't advise ANYONE to work for those villains.

And this my friends is why the oil/gas industry is not for everyone =P. I Mudlogged for about 3 years (2 of which was with TMC). I knew what I was getting myself into, I did the research. It is a very male dominated role but either way I learned a ton and made a good living doing it. Mudlogging was probably the only way a non-graduate degree individual can become a Geologist with a production company.

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oilpatch in Rockwall, Texas

83 months ago

I must say, Mudlogging is not a sexy job in the O&G industry. You get dirty, you are away in the field for days, weeks, a month or two at a time. Time off is way too short and precious.
I have been doing this since '93, straight out of the military (9yrs. active duty). Started with a small outfit that slowed down in '98. Moved on to another and then another. The current employer (The Mudlogging Company) has done me right.
I preform a job that is looked down upon in the O&G industry. I am the first one the Company man calls to get answers or to chew my ass for my telling a geologist too much drilling information. jack of all trades? yep, that's a mudlogger.
Martin Ridge: Did I have any prior experience? No. Did I have to learn the job on my own? No. It is called OJT. Some in the field of mudlogging train better then others. I was lucky to have had a decent trainer that took the time to explain, or maybe I asked the right questions. I pull down better then 60K/yr. It comes at a very high cost. Many have asked me why I have stayed in the mudlogging field. I would have to say that I like what I do and am damn good at it. But then a mudlogger is only as good as his last successful well.
Martin Ridge: I have trained so many hands I have lost count. If they stay longer then a year, I feel lucky. If they make it a year, there is a good chance they will go two. Many roll out after just a few weeks or months. Did I mention the lifestyle is not for everyone?
I have trained my sister~in~law, my wife, my brother, the wife of a fellow logger to log and am now working to get my daughter to try logging.
I guess what I am trying to say is, Mudlogging is not for everyone. If you try it, stick with it a year to give yourself the best chance of learning the minimum about to job and see if it becomes easier over that time. Otherwise keep looking for something else. I have only a limited amount of time to train my replacement.

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Girl in Lafayette, Louisiana

82 months ago

h6 in Richmond, Texas said: Kristina, as a woman as well as with someone with a BS in geology that I've gotten absolutely no use out of, please know that if you choose to stick with it you are not choosing an easy path and the fact that you are female is an added challenge. My short experience as a mud-logger (which is pretty much all you're going to get with just a BS) showed me that women are NOT welcomed onto rigs with open arms. In fact, they aren't welcome at all.

I completely disagree with everything you have said on this forum, H6. I am a girl and have been working on oil rigs (offshore and land) for over a year. All the men (except for one or two grumps) have been nothing but nice to me, treating me as they would a sister. They look out for you because you are a girl, not in spite of it. I don't love this job (I'm a field engineer by the way, but work alongside mudloggers), but it's because of the lifestyle, not the people I work with. Also, I've never worked out my arms a day in my life, but I've been able handle almost all the lifting that is necessary for the job. And on the rare occasion I can't lift something, I just ask a rig hand for help and they are glad to. Finally, I've gotten more periods on a rig than I can count. Suck it up and move on. It's not pleasant, but when is it ever? Pop a Midol and get to work!

Anyway, I would just hate to think of any girls not going into the oilfield based on the bad experience of one woman with a bad attitude. Rig life isn't perfect, but being a girl has nothing to do with it.

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ss in Calgary, Alberta

82 months ago

ehm, how do u get experience in geology?? Evry job posting I looked at need experience!! How am I gonna get exp. if I just graduated?

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Kajun-odo in Bakersfield, California

80 months ago

I can definitely relate to most of you guys. After graduating in 2009 with a Bachelors Degree in geology, it took me more than a year before I got my first job. Yes, it is mudlogging job but the company I am working is relatively better than the ones you can read on this forum. They fly us in and out of the location (our contracts are mostly in southern california), even if you are from the east coast or hawaii(?) they will fly you to california. We stay in a motel in a nearby town and they provide us with rental cars. We go back to the town everyday where we can drink beer at the local bar or dine in restaurants. Our company has been hiring over the last 6 months and around 20 new people have been accepted already. I believe the hiring will continue because most of the older loggers here are going back to grad school.

All I can say is work on your resume and make it look as good as possible. That's what I did. You dont need to pay several hundreds of dollars for other "specialist" to make your resume. You can do it yourself. Although I have to read several resume writing articles and ebooks to furnish my long and boring resume.

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G.Jenk in Newark, Ohio

80 months ago

Thats cool! my one prob is I have never performed mud logging. Here in Ohio its mostly drilling for soil samples n classifying it and in some cases we rock core but lol Ohio is either shale limestone or sandstone(boring geology) lol

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G.Jenk in Newark, Ohio

80 months ago

old geologist in Lake Jackson, Texas said: Just heard from a mining company in another country. They said I do not have the skills they desire. Funny, I have done the same job in the past and I found minerals. I wrote the report and calculated the reserves. I even laid out the mine area for the engineers. I do not think these HR people have a clue about just what a Geologist does or how to read a resume. Anyone else have these types of experiences?

Yeah I have lol, Im in Ohio n all I have ever worked with has been civil engineers had one tell me that he doesn't beleive in using Geologists on projects said just a waste of budget said he can describe soil n rock just as well so yeah im in the same boat man.

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Texan in Dallas in Midland, Texas

80 months ago

Yea, my experience is that that some folks have no idea what to look for sometimes when looking at resumes. You can only hope someone who knows the industry looks at your resume. I've also gone on interviews where the guy doing the interview desribes a job that sounds unlike the job posting

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G.Jenk in Newark, Ohio

80 months ago

Yup! hell i even took a day off from work to go to an interview with the Ohio EPA only to be told that the job went to someone internally! missed a whole days pay. I have came to the conclusion I need to get out of Ohio lol

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Mudlogger in Pine Grove, California

78 months ago

I don't know why everyone here has had such bad luck. I graduated in spring of 2011 and EVERY member of my graduating clas in geology was either employed before graduation or within a couple of months. I myself was hired as a mud logger within a month of graduating. You guys looking for jobs need to network with your classmates and professors in order to find a job. Most young geologist I know got jobs because someone knew someone who was hiring. Your professors know geologists in the industry and you need to capitalize on that. They all have friends who are senior geologists or run their own companies. Pick their brains, befriend a professor, see if you can help them with their research. There is more to getting a Geo degree than showing up and turning in your homework. Network within the small Geo community and it will pay off. As far as mud logging I love it. I've work oil and geothermal wells all over the world. This is definitely a job for people that don't mind working long hours or traveling a lot. I also work directly with energy company geologists and already have had a couple ask me to come work for them. I garuntee you if you work hard and look in the right places you will find a Geo job. Their are tons of them out there.I have friends working for environmental, oil, geotech, and engineering companies and they are all hiring right now. Get out there and good luck.

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s.williamson in Muncy, Pennsylvania

78 months ago

Best comment I have ever seen on this forum. This is the attitude you should have, upon embarking on your new career.

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Sneji in Granada Hills, California

78 months ago

s.williamson in Muncy, Pennsylvania said: Best comment I have ever seen on this forum. This is the attitude you should have, upon embarking on your new career.

Easy to say.....

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Ekaterina in Toronto, Ontario

78 months ago

I'm HR consultant looking for geologists,chief geologists, exploration managers and mining professionals for my clients all over the world.
I can't guarantee a job but an additional opportunity to find it. All interested can contact me by e-mail: e.kimaeva@inbox.com
Best regards,
Ekaterina

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McNutty in Massapequa, New York

77 months ago

Ive read some pretty depressing posts on here, Whew- I was hoping someone with some experience in Geology could give a breakdown of what types of jobs catagories there are in Geology. Let me say, Im 32 I have a degree in Business, hated the work, landed a job as a Driller -Stabo work, and I bumped elbows with some geologists. I actually like drilling as sadistic as that seems. I decided to study Geology, and I really want to land a job on an oil rig, or in some remote location somewhere near the corner of the earth getting really dirty, freezing cold, and attacked by bears or something. Can anyone suggest, what path to take in my studies to get me the best chance of landing that sweet job. No joke as funny as it seems. I will do whatever it takes to land a job in some remote mountain region, desert, or ocean!

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jake noneyour in salt lake city, Utah

77 months ago

McNutty in Massapequa, New York said: Ive read some pretty depressing posts on here, Whew- I was hoping someone with some experience in Geology could give a breakdown of what types of jobs catagories there are in Geology. Let me say, Im 32 I have a degree in Business, hated the work, landed a job as a Driller -Stabo work, and I bumped elbows with some geologists. I actually like drilling as sadistic as that seems. I decided to study Geology, and I really want to land a job on an oil rig, or in some remote location somewhere near the corner of the earth getting really dirty, freezing cold, and attacked by bears or something. Can anyone suggest, what path to take in my studies to get me the best chance of landing that sweet job. No joke as funny as it seems. I will do whatever it takes to land a job in some remote mountain region, desert, or ocean!

I work for an oil service company and just got off an offshore rig in the Gulf. I am a mudlogger or "mud logging geologist" to be fancy. I obtained a degree in Geology and didn't specialize in anything specific. It depends what you really want to do, if it's oil go for petroleum engineering, if it's mining go to a school of mining and engineering, Montana has a good one. But really a straight geo degree will do, but it may be a little harder to find a job. It took me about a year. Right now things are booming in the Gulf as the Moratorium situation is dying down. I am new at my job, just 4 months in and I have done so much, traveled to different countries for training, worked along side wellsite geologists, and many more!

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jake noneyour in salt lake city, Utah

77 months ago

McNutty in Massapequa, New York said: Ive read some pretty depressing posts on here, Whew- I was hoping someone with some experience in Geology could give a breakdown of what types of jobs catagories there are in Geology. Let me say, Im 32 I have a degree in Business, hated the work, landed a job as a Driller -Stabo work, and I bumped elbows with some geologists. I actually like drilling as sadistic as that seems. I decided to study Geology, and I really want to land a job on an oil rig, or in some remote location somewhere near the corner of the earth getting really dirty, freezing cold, and attacked by bears or something. Can anyone suggest, what path to take in my studies to get me the best chance of landing that sweet job. No joke as funny as it seems. I will do whatever it takes to land a job in some remote mountain region, desert, or ocean!

So my advice, do internships during your summer breaks, volunteer, become a member of professional societies, oh and study of course. Good Luck! Geology is one of the greatest studies!!

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gf in Muscat, Oman

77 months ago

jake noneyour in salt lake city, Utah said: So my advice, do internships during your summer breaks, volunteer, become a member of professional societies, oh and study of course. Good Luck! Geology is one of the greatest studies!!

does pursuing a bachelors of science in geology involve alot of math coursework or is it just the basics with just alittle of complicated stuff lol

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bubba in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

76 months ago

Come to Canada they are begging for geologists to work here, and you will make more money than most Doctors.

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Geofun in Tuscaloosa, Alabama

76 months ago

I completely agree. Not one person had ever heard of a PG in my class until we started interviewing. My personal belief for professors at our college not mentioning it is they spent minimum time in industry and don't think about telling us this.

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bob curfman in Calgary, Alberta

75 months ago

carpediem in Davenport, Iowa said: Just Curious what type of work you did straight out of college? I am really hurting here. I graduated 6 months ago with a BS in geology and I haven't have one phone call yet. I've had two internships with the government during my college years but still that doesn't seem to help me. I've been digging so deep for jobs. I've applied for almost every single job category in the geosciences.

Anyone have any suggestions for good mud logging companies or anything, just anything. Thank you.

I am looking for geo's work in ohio b-curfman@hotmail.com

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bob curfman in Calgary, Alberta

75 months ago

looking for geo's have work b-curfman@hotmail.com

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bob curfman in Calgary, Alberta

75 months ago

looking for geo's have work b-curfman@hotmail.com

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Mudlogger in San Jose, California

75 months ago

Kajun-odo in Bakersfield, California said: I can definitely relate to most of you guys. After graduating in 2009 with a Bachelors Degree in geology, it took me more than a year before I got my first job. Yes, it is mudlogging job but the company I am working is relatively better than the ones you can read on this forum. They fly us in and out of the location (our contracts are mostly in southern california), even if you are from the east coast or hawaii(?) they will fly you to california. We stay in a motel in a nearby town and they provide us with rental cars. We go back to the town everyday where we can drink beer at the local bar or dine in restaurants. Our company has been hiring over the last 6 months and around 20 new people have been accepted already. I believe the hiring will continue because most of the older loggers here are going back to grad school.

Which mudlogging company do you work for? Looking to maybe switch. Thanks!
All I can say is work on your resume and make it look as good as possible. That's what I did. You dont need to pay several hundreds of dollars for other "specialist" to make your resume. You can do it yourself. Although I have to read several resume writing articles and ebooks to furnish my long and boring resume.

Which mudlogging company do you work for? Currently looking to maybe switch companies. Thanks!

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Rockhead in Carlsbad, New Mexico

75 months ago

For those still in school or wishing to pursue an MS in geology (or other sciences), you may wish to look into the Bureau of Land Management's Student Career Experience Program (SCEP): www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/res/blm_jobs/students_and_recent/scep.html

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SD in Calgary, Alberta

74 months ago

old geologist in Lake Jackson, Texas said: I do not think these HR people have a clue about just what a Geologist does or how to read a resume. Anyone else have these types of experiences?

Older Geophysics MSc student here, you're absolutely right about clueless HR types, the trick has always been to get around these gatekeepers and it's not easy. I'm a recent BSc. grad from the wrong side of the age tracks(40+) and even though I graduated in the top 10% of my class I can barely get an interview(10% hit rate) and I've never gotten even a summer internship in three years of trying.

I see all this happening and then I see women and minorities and minority women get the red carpet rolled out for them by these HR types, even when their GPAs were mediocre at best. I've seen 60% of new grad jobs get staffed by the "protected" classes and the very best students not get a single offer because they not "favored".

I've been informed by a headhunter off the record that I'm "unemployable" because most O&G and resource company HR departments are fixated on youth and will absolutely not entertain the idea of an entry level grad over the age of 45. This when I have almost 20 years of computer experience and a physics BS in addition to a Geophysics(hons) BS degree.

All potential geoscience students need to realize that the information put out by O&G companies and their service companies are 99% propaganda and hype. The so called demographic hiring crisis when the Boomers retire is all hot air, what a lot of these companies have done is offshore the jobs like other companies in other sectors.

The only reason they keep broadcasting this propaganda is to collect resumes and select only the most perfect candidates, ie 4.0 GPA, the right pedigree in terms of clubs, community organizations etc.
In effect less then 5% of new grads will be picked up by the super majors and I think only about 25% of new grads of any year will be hired, if they're lucky.

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Mine Recruiter in Colorado Springs, Colorado

74 months ago

When an individual is immerse in generalities and prejudices, their perspective is skewed and the individual no longer has an accurate viewpoint or understands the issue. In every profession there are good people who are skilled professionals and there are bad people who for one reason or another are in a position in which they should leave immediately. However, we work in an industry to which we have no room for people who are not productive. No room for unproductive people in HR as well as in Geology.

As a candidate, you have to meet the criteria of the position. I find that older Geologists do not know the current mining software applications. Mining employers are not training people. You have to have the specific experience and you have to be able to present this in your resume. A lot of people have also hurt themselves by being unproductive on their previous job or not being able to work with other people. It's a small world and it doesn't take but a couple calls to find out that a candidate is a bad apple.

You can complain about HR, the government, the man, whatever or you can be realistic. Don't apply for a job that you are not qualified for. How do you know that the Geology team knows you are a buttock hole and they have told HR to throw your resume in the trash. Stop making assumptions and be realistic. Pointing fingers and blaming people does nothing for no one.

Take a realistic analysis of your skill set. Go after opportunities that closely match your experience. Do your homework. Everyone wants to work for the big players in the industry versus working for a junior mining company.

It takes work. I think you are partially right. You need to contact people in the industry to see if there are opportunities out there that meet your skill set. Don't burn bridges. If you make a bad name for yourself, people are not going to hire you.

I sincerely wish you the best.

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rock doc

74 months ago

I gave up looking for a job during 2008 after a headhunter told me I am unemployable because my degree is too old. I recently took the ASBOG FG exam and passed it the first time I took it. I guess I did well because I have been teaching geology courses as an adjunt during the last couple of years.

I still have headhunter calling me, but all they want is for me to explain technical terms to them. They keep asking,"What does that word mean?" or "What should I be looking for on a Geologist resume/cv?"

As an old geologist who is unemployable, I have found the various software packages used in mining, as well as o&g, to be easy to use. I go to the companies site and down-load the demos and play with their example data base. I construct cross sections from e-logs and seismic sections for o&g or cuttings and cores for mining.
The software companies have demos and training resources of their sites, but they are expensive.

That is just my experience, during the last three years as I spend time in my cardboard box under one of the I-45 overpasses in Texas, after a headhunter told me I am unemployable because I have a bad reputation or poor grades or lack experience or I am just too freaking old.

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trans-pecos dot com in Odessa, Texas

74 months ago

Oil & Gas is probably the most demanding industry to work in, and it's simply not for most people. That being said, if you think you are the right person, getting a job in the current market is not very hard at the moment. I would also add, that most people who condemn O&G's "cyclical" nature, and characterize it as being unreliable, are only the people who have been jaded by it, or have been told that by someone who has. If you get into a quality organization, and are not jumping ship every six months to a year for an extra $5.00/hr or some other frivolous benefit, long term employment is not some long lost concept. Companies do not terminate quality people!

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hammer in Elkins, West Virginia

73 months ago

mikeg19_82 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin said: I graduated in May 2008 with a BS in Geosciences from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. I have had no luck finding work. I've applied for many many jobs including oil companies, as well as local, regional, and national environmental consulting jobs. One world-renowned company I just about got hired to in Washington, DC had a hiring freeze after my final interviews. My resume is on most databases and the "environmental jobs" websites.

What do degree holders do with this degree? I'm currently a part-time bank teller. I need help.

I understand your situation because I was in the same boat. Get your Masters Degree. I almost started on 2 occassions however marriage, kids and debt kept me from going. You will have a better chance with an advanced degree. GET YOUR MASTERS and you won't be working as a technician.

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me

72 months ago

Mine Recruiter in Colorado Springs, Colorado said: When an individual is immerse in generalities and prejudices, their perspective is skewed and the individual no longer has an accurate viewpoint or understands the issue. In every profession there are good people who are skilled professionals and there are bad people who for one reason or another are in a position in which they should leave immediately. However, we work in an industry to which we have no room for people who are not productive. No room for unproductive people in HR as well as in Geology.

As a candidate, you have to meet the criteria of the position. I find that older Geologists do not know the current mining software applications. Mining employers are not training people.

Do you think universities train undsergraduate students to use mining software applications? I have a PhD and I teach geology courses. I can tell you that there is not enough time to introduce all software applications in any course. They are too expensive for an university to buy all of them. Some are of very limited use, and that is is a gentle and kind statement. Which universities teach the use of specific mining software applications to undergraduate students?

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Val Bayuga in Angeles, Philippines

72 months ago

Good day to all the Geologist on this site. I am not a Geologist but I am seeking advice from all of you. Don't have money to pay for Geologist consultant so here we go.

Cement, gravel, sand and water as usually applied in road building or construction of highways. This one is different.It is perhaps, the most hardened cement concrete one can ever imagine. The presence of affirmative evidence proves that the endurance and hardness of the same is comparable to iron steel. Based on continuing studies and research, there is that enormous amount of silica quartz and pyrites mixed together with undetermined amount of resin adhesive and hardener. There is also an authentic presence of fly ash and intrusion aid. The process of mixture is dry pouring method. The moisture of the soil served as a slowing catalyst.
My question is how can I break this seal? Portable jackhammer is painstaking. Can't use a bigger jackhammer because there is little room to work. Drilling takes too much time and I have used a lot of bits because it keeps breaking or tip smoothen out. I've been told that there is a chemical that I can se that can aid or hopefully break and even melt this formidable seal. Location is in a cave and yes this seal is man made. I appreciate for any input from all of you fine Geologist.

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londonguy in London, United Kingdom

71 months ago

Garrett in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania said: If you don't even have enough professional experience to know how to proofread your own "writting" what makes you think that people will want to work for you?

you are a douchebag.

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Garrett in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

71 months ago

londonguy in London, United Kingdom said: you are a douchebag.

I thought it was good advice since the poster was asking for "excellent writting skills." Bottom line: An employer shouldn't demand professionalism if they are not professional. It's usually a very stressful thing attempting to get a job, and yet you have companies coming on here and telling stressed out people that they want a high degree of professionalism without having much themselves. A job should be a MUTUAL privilege between the employer and employee, not "You'll want to work for us no matter what we say, how we act, or the amount of professionalism we exhibit." If an employer expects you to show up to an interview in a suit, I expect THEM to be able to proofread themselves.

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Garrett in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

71 months ago

jenny in Houston, Texas said: Hello all,

I debating on going back to school as a post baccalaureate student for geology. I currently have a nutrition degree therefore it would only take me roughly 2 years to finish a second BS in geology, but would it be absolutely nessecary to get a MS in geology? After i am done with school, i would like to get into the job market asap. Is this highly unlikely?

I agree with what the other poster (BN97201) said. Geology is one of those professions where a Master's makes a world of a difference. I would also recommend investigating the many sub-disciplines of Geology (if you haven't already!) and perhaps Google "What types of jobs can a _____ get." There's the fantasy of Geology - working in the field and making decent money, going to exotic locales, being immersed in nature...Then there's (what could be) the reality - working long hours in an unstable energy industry, being in the middle of nowhere in less than favorable weather, being a grunt where "field work" is generally seen as bottom rung of the corporate ladder (if you want to advance you will probably be working in an office).

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bubbalutz in Regina, Saskatchewan

71 months ago

huami in Vancouver, British Columbia said: I m in Canada looking for geology jobs. I have no experience. Really anything I can take even without pay.

Move to Calgary

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Blah in Rock Springs, Wyoming

71 months ago

Tom in Texarkana, Texas said: A mud logger doesn't need to have a geology major for the position. No one can never start at the top, but their are oilfield positions besides mudlogging that are entry level and pay twice as much. Having a 40,000 dollar degree and going to work at 13 an hour for 5 years is unproductive. Mudlogging companies just use and abuse Geology graduates. Almost all follow crude practices. Anyone here have a positive mudlogging experience?

Believe it or not there are quite a few mudlogging companies that only hire degreed geologists. Although, I have heard that it dosent take much to be a mudlogger in Texas. I have been a mudlogger in Colorado for about 2 years now and have had a fairly good experience thus far. Granted its not something I want to be stuck doing for the rest of my life. I make around 80k a year and get to take off as much time as I want. Typically, I work approx. 2-3 weeks a month. You WILL need a Masters to get a Ops Geo position with an O&G company. However, they do offer many geotech positions that assist the exploration and productions teams as well for undergraduate degrees. You gotta start somewhere right?

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Tom in Dallas, Texas

71 months ago

Blah in Rock Springs, Wyoming said: Believe it or not there are quite a few mudlogging companies that only hire degreed geologists. Although, I have heard that it dosent take much to be a mudlogger in Texas. I have been a mudlogger in Colorado for about 2 years now and have had a fairly good experience thus far. Granted its not something I want to be stuck doing for the rest of my life. I make around 80k a year and get to take off as much time as I want. Typically, I work approx. 2-3 weeks a month. You WILL need a Masters to get a Ops Geo position with an O&G company. However, they do offer many geotech positions that assist the exploration and productions teams as well for undergraduate degrees. You gotta start somewhere right?

Yes, I am aware many companies only hire people with Geology degrees. As far as Texas mudlogging companies, your looking at making 150 - 200 a day. At these rates if you worked every single day of the year you would only be around 50k - 65k. Your either working all the time, or Colorado day rates are significantly higher in the Niobrara. You said 2 - 3 weeks a month? That would put your day rate at about 350. I am sure everyone on this board would want to know which mudlogging company is paying that rate.

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