Do LPNs have to draw blood?

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Comments (14)

Holly in Terre Haute, Indiana

66 months ago

I am considering going to school for LPN but im a little weary of having to deal with to much blood. I want to help people and get in the heaalthcare profession but i cant handle dripping blood. Should i turn back before i get any farther or would i not have to deal with blood too much?Also, are LPNs the people you see BEFORE you see the doctor or RN when going into the doctors office? is it the people that take blood pressure reading,weight,write down on the files..ect? or is that the Medical assistant. Please give me any advice you have!I appreciate it!

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simone in Wilson, North Carolina

66 months ago

in many places you do have to draw blood now. if u dont like dripping blood maybe this isnt the profession for you. u can work part time. if you become a lpn, home health would probably be good for you. most md offices hire med assistants or rns. do yourself a favor and go for rn. ive been a lpn for 14 years and the difference in pay is unreal but theres not much difference in duties. plan on going back to school for something in radiology next semester. good luck.

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Kat in Mansfield, Texas

65 months ago

Nurses usually do not draw blood. I have worked for 3 years and have not had to draw blood once. In fact, it is not a skill usually taught in nursing school. In hospitals and nursing homes, a phlebotomist is the one that usually draws the blood. You would more likely to have to start and IV than draw blood. Depending on where you work, you will most likely not have to deal with much blood. It's the other bodily fluids that you will have more contact with...

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Kat in Mansfield, Texas

65 months ago

Holly in Terre Haute, Indiana said: Can you work part-time as an LPN or do people mostly only hire for full-time?

Nursing is very flexible, you can work part time, full time, over time, or PRN (an "as needed" basis where you choose when you want to work).

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monty in Fairfield, Ohio

64 months ago

im trying to find out what are the different jobs an lpn can have and what are the differences in them

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monty in Fairfield, Ohio

64 months ago

what is the difference between a two year degree lpn and a certifcate progran lpn thats a year long (full time student)and is there a pay difference

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nubianqueen in Bronx, New York

63 months ago

i am an LPN and i draw blood. if u where trained in school then i think its ok to draw blood

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Kat in Arlington, Texas

63 months ago

monty in Fairfield, Ohio said: what is the difference between a two year degree lpn and a certifcate progran lpn thats a year long (full time student)and is there a pay difference

You won't have any pay difference. All LPNs take the same licensing exam called the NCLEX-PN. The advantage to having a degree is that it will make bridging to becoming an RN easier. Other than just having a few extra basic classes I don't see any difference between the two. LPNs are normally employed at nursing and rehabilitation centers, assisted living facilities, doctor's offices and clinics, hospitals, dialysis, and in home health and hospice.

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Oilrelax in Vacaville, California

34 months ago

nubianqueen in Bronx, New York said: i am an LPN and i draw blood. if u where trained in school then i think its ok to draw blood

The scope of practice for an LVN/LPN varies from state to state. In California LVNs can draw blood/start IVs as long as they acquire separate IV/Blood Withdrawal Certification.

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harrisoncarolena@yahoo.com in Bedford, Indiana

34 months ago

Kat in Mansfield, Texas said: Nurses usually do not draw blood. I have worked for 3 years and have not had to draw blood once. In fact, it is not a skill usually taught in nursing school. In hospitals and nursing homes, a phlebotomist is the one that usually draws the blood. You would more likely to have to start and IV than draw blood. Depending on where you work, you will most likely not have to deal with much blood. It's the other bodily fluids that you will have more contact with...

I've worked in a healthcare facialty for 7 yrs and we draw the labs and do IV's both if you can't stand blood then this is not for you

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andeocuvar in Tampa, Florida

34 months ago

Kat in Mansfield, Texas said: Nurses usually do not draw blood. I have worked for 3 years and have not had to draw blood once. In fact, it is not a skill usually taught in nursing school. In hospitals and nursing homes, a phlebotomist is the one that usually draws the blood. You would more likely to have to start and IV than draw blood. Depending on where you work, you will most likely not have to deal with much blood. It's the other bodily fluids that you will have more contact with...

I've been an RN for 5 years and I've worked in a hospital that whole time. I deal with blood on a daily basis. I draw blood, give blood, start IVs, pull out IVs, clean blood from when the patients rip out their IVs... So lots and lots of blood in nursing. I don't know where this person works that they never had to deal with blood, but whatever it is they are doing it is an exception not a rule.

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Lpn 18years in Leesburg, Virginia

33 months ago

Worked in Maryland and Northern Virginia in long-term care and rehab facilities hardly did any blood draws. Usually had Phlebotomist available and lab close by in facility. IV starts were by IV nurses brought in but had to hang IV meds, flushes, and discountinue lines. Most patients came in with Pic lines or central lines already. Always have to deal with blood though from other areas such as wound care, and it coming from several orafices. Now I work in employee health center and draw blood daily. It's great being a nurse (LPN) for 18 years. Going for health care administration now maybe masters ;-)

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ashley stanley in Magnolia, Texas

31 months ago

Holly in Terre Haute, Indiana said: I am considering going to school for LPN but im a little weary of having to deal with to much blood. I want to help people and get in the heaalthcare profession but i cant handle dripping blood. Should i turn back before i get any farther or would i not have to deal with blood too much?Also, are LPNs the people you see BEFORE you see the doctor or RN when going into the doctors office? is it the people that take blood pressure reading,weight,write down on the files..ect? or is that the Medical assistant. Please give me any advice you have!I appreciate it!

its the nurse before docter comes in.

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toddlerlvn in Vacaville, California

31 months ago

Holly in Terre Haute, Indiana said: I am considering going to school for LPN but im a little weary of having to deal with to much blood. I want to help people and get in the heaalthcare profession but i cant handle dripping blood. Should i turn back before i get any farther or would i not have to deal with blood too much?Also, are LPNs the people you see BEFORE you see the doctor or RN when going into the doctors office? is it the people that take blood pressure reading,weight,write down on the files..ect? or is that the Medical assistant . Please give me any advice you have!I appreciate it!

Many clinics use LPN/LVNs to take vital signs, collect patient history, give immunizations, and assist doctors with minor procedures. In California LVNs can draw blood or start IVs, but only after completing an additional certification.

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