Boom or bust?

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (1 to 50 of 106)
Page:   1  2  3  Next »   Last »

Host

Are jobs in this industry on the rise? Are there any sub-sectors that are growing?

Where are the jobs? Which places have the most machinist opportunities?

Reply - Report abuse

Dave Lyon in Lawson, Missouri

93 months ago

I know my shop could use some help. Anybody got any experence with plastic injection molds?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (17) / No (8) Reply - Report abuse

Robert Capalbo in Saint Clair Shores, Michigan

86 months ago

Dave Lyon in Lawson, Missouri said: I know my shop could use some help. Anybody got any experence with plastic injection molds?

Where is the shop I have 40 years building them?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (12) / No (5) Reply - Report abuse

Fred Buckles in Grapevine, Texas

75 months ago

I am a contract sourcing specialist for Accenture, representing Unilever Corp, a large provider of Consumer Goods. We are always looking for machine operators, production managers, mechanics, and skilled factory workers for our many plants in the US.

The Unilever website is www.unileverusa.com/ourcompany/careers/jobsearch/ . No obligation.

Good luck,

Fred

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (8) Reply - Report abuse

kim in Sun City, California

72 months ago

After 35 yrs. in the trade; I'm just starting to make some decent $. Those jobs are few & far between. I say RUN!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (23) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Robert Capalbo in New Baltimore, Michigan

72 months ago

kim in Sun City, California said: After 35 yrs. in the trade; I'm just starting to make some decent $. Those jobs are few & far between. I say RUN!

I am 60 years old and just got the kids all going for themselves. I have nothing saved for retirement and figure I will work the day I die. No big deal but they have made making a living for a toolmaker that has been in the trade for 44 years almost impossible.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (25) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

ken pruitt in Garland, Texas

72 months ago

cnc & cadcam will get you work in this area-if you are a manual
machinist with 25 years experance you cant find a job in injection
mold making

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (8) / No (6) Reply - Report abuse

SouthernFried in Smyrna, Georgia

71 months ago

As someone pointed out in a previous post, there is a still a demand for CNC Programmers/CAD/CAM Programmers. My husband is a Machinist and realized about a couple of years ago that he was going to have to go back to school to upgrade his skills. He is currently learning MasterCam/Cad and other software. This is a must if you want to remain marketable. When he done with this degree, he will transfer into a Industrial Tech. Bachelors degree. If you love what you do, don't give up on the field, just step up your game. Machinists are and will always be in demand. Someone is always contacting him about a job, even though hes currently employed.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (17) / No (5) Reply - Report abuse

Bob Capalbo in New Baltimore, Michigan

71 months ago

I am 60 years old and my short term memory is bad. I can still do anything a tool-maker can. What do I do? Where do you live?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (12) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Bob Capalbo in New Baltimore, Michigan

71 months ago

Dave Lyon in Lawson, Missouri said: I know my shop could use some help. Anybody got any experence with plastic injection molds?

I have 45 years building injection molds. Where is that job you say was there?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No Reply - Report abuse

micky62 in Patchogue, New York

70 months ago

No doubt, it's a trade that is hard to recommend to kids. I graduated the Tooling and Machining Inst. of New York in 1984. At that time it was booming here on Long Island. Grumman Corp., Fairchild-Republic, Eaton AIL and all the small shops supporting them. All gone. For what you have to know to be a good all-around machinist, the pay is peanuts. You can expect $50K with regular O.T.. A good plumber can make $70K for 35 hrs..

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (15) / No Reply - Report abuse

Cousin Marcello in San Francisco, California

68 months ago

Bob Capalbo in New Baltimore, Michigan said: I am 60 years old and my short term memory is bad. I can still do anything a tool-maker can. What do I do? Where do you live?

Please contact me re: vocational opportunities.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Robert Capalbo in New Baltimore, Michigan

68 months ago

Cousin Marcello in San Francisco, California said: Please contact me re: vocational opportunities.

Hey I need your email address.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

Cousin Marcello in San Francisco, California

68 months ago

sf_marcello@yahoo.com

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

micky62 in Patchogue, New York

68 months ago

Bob,
I guess the good part is, if you make a mistake on a job you don't dwell on it. Just kidding.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Jerry in Asheboro, North Carolina

66 months ago

I just fell victim to the layoff demon(again). I have been cutting steel since 1972 (in a Vocational High School, anyone still remeber those?). I have moved from New York to Texas back to New York, and down to North Carolina from starting work in the job shops and manufacturing companies. I am an "Old School Die Hard Toolmaker". Just like so many (or so few of us left) I can make anything that a person can dream up or tell me what they want it to do, using the manual machines. Today it is all CNC / CAD. I have attended classes on the new machines but my past employer did not have them in the shop, or if they did get one in a department it was only used by "specalists" or "technicians". At 50 years old I find myself for all practicle purposes "obsolete". Amazing how after all these years I find myself with this "now what" problem. This old dog has chased the "rabbit" a good long ways, tried to keep up, even have two AS Degrees and international experience but it seems the search this time will be a lot longer and harder. Years ago it meant moving around the country to keep working, today it requires turning back the hands of time or so it seems. I want to wish everyone who reads this the best of luck continuing in the trade and good hunting to those who like me are searching for a place where they understand what and who a real toolmaker is and capable of doing.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (13) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

robertcapalbo2001_@yahoo.com in New Baltimore, Michigan

66 months ago

I too went to vocational school and consider myself ad old time toolmaker. I moved here from New Jersey 3 decades ago because there where pages and pages of machinist and toolmakers jobe. Well I have watch it get less and less jobs posted until finally I can't even find a job posted.
This country was built by industry and in a heart beat they gave it away to other countries (NAFTA).
I have 45 years machining to close tolerance and have a lifetime experience to ofer and pass on but atlas no one sees any value in it.
I am 61 years old and can't find a job.
Someone tell me what to do.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No Reply - Report abuse

Jerry in Asheboro, North Carolina

66 months ago

Well, Robert we are in a larger group than either of us may have dreamed possible. Without toolmakers and machinists everything will eventually grind to a halt in manufacturing. The true impact of legislation such as NAFTA are only starting. At 61 years old and 45 years cutting steel you have attained what in the past would have been a status of respect and value not measured in dollars and sense but as iconic. Now the first time I laid a toolbit against a piece of steel I was 12 years old. I was infected by the steel and have carried on a love/hate affair with the trade ever since. Now 38 years later I am an obsolete Master Toolmaker. I dedicated every ounce of my energy and working life to the pursuit of perfection only to have the wood slats yanked out from beneath me. Well there are many sad stories out there and growing by the minute. What to do? I do not think jumping up and down and spitting green jellybeans is the right answer but other than continuing the search there may not be much else to do. A career change for me may be the answer (forced or otherwise). I do not give up easily, I can be beaten, just not broken. I am originally a Buffalo New York resident. I learned the trade in New York and finally had to move to both Texas and North Carolina to keep working. Where to now? I don't rightly know. My suggestion starts with a prayer to God for all of us in this mess. God has seen us through to this point in our lives and will continue as long as we don't give up on ourselves or Him. I am not trying to preach to anybody. It just seems the right time to trust that whatever happens to us is a little bigger than we are. Toolmakers are a notorious bunch concerning ego and for playing as hard as they work, which is pretty extreme. What nobody can take away from we, the American Toolmakers, is pride in a job done better than is possible anyplace on this planet. We have done more with less, longer and in the face of hardship than anybody else

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (16) / No Reply - Report abuse

Jami in Randleman, North Carolina

63 months ago

I certainly feel for you guys. I don't have near the tool making experience you have but I have 8 years of CNC. I fell victim to nafta back in 2000 when the textile company I worked for decided to move the operation south. The plant closed mid 2000 and I managed to find another job doing the same thing within a couple months. On the downside, I was laid off within 6 months. I decided to go to school on the governments dime and learn a new trade, machining. I graduated with my associate degree in 2003 and had a job even before graduation. I was pretty much locked into CNC work programming, setting up, and running CNC turning centers. Just this past January my employer decided money was tight and decided to let me go even though I was 2nd on the seniority list. Let me just say he is not someone I really enjoyed working for right out of school. He had no appreciation or gratitude for the skills I had right out of school. I pretty much took his single CNC lathe and made the best parts above and beyond expectation. After 6 years of working for him and helping him build up a lathe dept. consisting of 5 lathes he still had no appreciation for the growth of my skills. He is the type of person one cannot satisfy. So, I made a mistake on a job and he demanded I fix the mistake off the clock or find a new job. I fixed the mistake but he still felt it would serve him best if I left. So I did. I am drawing unemployment now and searching for a new job. I am nearing the end of my benefits and still I have not even been called for an interview for any of the machining jobs I have applied for. Right now I am considering going back to school to either further my knowledge in the machining or mechanical field or do a complete career change. Right now I just don't know. What can a CNC machinist do to further their career in the field? I enjoy machining but I want to acquire a bachelors degree relating in some form to machining. What can a man do?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Tradesmen in Pensacola, Florida

63 months ago

Interesting . Sorry to hear about the problems . I took machine shop in trade school in 1974 and 75 ,I really liked it . However in my area there simply were no jobs ,really don't know why but I turned around and went to the same trade school for A/C and refrigeration and have worked all the hours I can stand up to now,still am . in fact I work a job and own my own A/C company . I make 29.32 an hour with full benefits on my regular job and make 75 an hour when I run my own truck , not uncommon to make 1000 to 2000 in a day when installing equipment .Not bragging just saying a/c is a good field to go into ,at least in the south . I have to turn down work all the time .

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No Reply - Report abuse

Anthony Croenlein in Louisburg, North Carolina

63 months ago

I have a small machine shop in Louisburg, NC. I am in need of an experienced CNC operator. Any interest?

Applicant must be able to read and interpret shop prints. Ability to draw using Gibbs Cam version 9.0 2009, program, and send work pieces to CNC Vertical Milling machine(Doosan Revo 4020 3-axis with Fanuc controls Oi-MB. maximizing G and M code processing. Run 2007 Doosan Puma 2000Y mill & drill Fanuc Ser 18i-TB Controls. Must work well as a team member and possess the ability to work independently.
General requirements :
Candidate must possess a healthy work ethic. Honorability is a must. Strong organizational skills a large plus. Ability to perform with skill and accuracy is vital.
Technical requirements :
Work with Gibbs Cam 2009 software. CNC programing proficiency required.
Candidates should have some experinence with :
2007 Doosan Puma 2000Y Mill & Drill with Fanuc Ser. 18i-TB controls and 2004 Doosan Revo 4020 3 axis Vertical Machining Center with Fanuc Ser. Oi-MB Controls.
Hiring Process:
Contact Anthony Croenlein at swisstoolcraft@yahoo.com to submit resume and schedule an interview.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

FLS Taneytown in Taneytown, Maryland

62 months ago

Flowserve's Taneytown, MD location manufactures large industrial pumps.

We are always in need of experienced CNC programmer machinists who can program using Edgecam, set up/operate lathes, have experience with large castings, and work with 0.001" tolerances.

We offer competitive pay and excellent benefits. Please send resumes to TaneytownHR@Flowserve.com

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

jpryka@aol.com

62 months ago

55 and been machining over 30 years.
Didn,t know there were so many of us!
At one time we could get a good wage anywhere.
I have been lucky to of found other good jobs.
Miss machining but won't do it for wages offered.
Hurt's to realize my skills aren't valued.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Jerry in Asheboro, North Carolina

62 months ago

I am in the process of starting a shop of my own. Since my layoff in March 2009, I was lucky in that the Government has placed what is called Project GATE here in North Carolina. GATE stands for Growing America Through Entrepreneurship. I think it is presently in four States. Look it up on the internet and see what you think. You all may want to take a look at this Project GATE, AND IF IT IS NOT IN YOUR STATE START ASKING YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS WHY IT IS NOT IN YOUR STATE. It does not have to be a shop. Project GATE is for dislocated workers. Those of us laid off through no fault of our own. It is a ray of hope at the very least. I did not qualify for anything else but the way it is looking maybe I can get a business of my own going and it will be a place where the more years you have the better! Project GATE is there to help you learn how to start a business (any kind you want) and teach you about things like a business plan and help you through the process of getting going. I may find in the months to come that starting a shop is a bad idea, or that it is the right thing to do. If a shop is not possible then I will start some other kind of business. Never quit on yourself!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

GCA in Mc Minnville, Tennessee

62 months ago

Been a machinist and cutter grinder for over 30 years making less now than 20 years ago love it but no money in it anymore

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (5) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Jerry in Asheboro, North Carolina

62 months ago

The problem is not that the skills have no value. Technology has outpaced many of us in the trade. I have attended some of the classes for CNC at the local community college and find that the toolmaker of the present and future need to understand CAD/CAM and programming. I know, I know, it seems as those of us with decades of experience should be worth a very pretty penny indeed. However, what is needed today is for all of us hard core old school toolmakers to realize that we need to adapt to technology. Going back to learn the new machines is no more difficult then the way we learned the trade to begin with. The differnce is you are only trying to learn a machine, you already know what to do with it! Today machine tools do not need complex setups and all kinds of attachments. They still do need some things but not like before. Everything we know that came from inventing impossible setups and doing work that nobody else could do is still worthwhile. If you go to the schools and just give it a try you have nothing to lose. I was in a class where there was a mix of every age group. From snot nosed little kiddies to master toolmakers. Sure the puppies will yap a lot (We did when we were green too)and you may need to settle them down with facts such as you have been cutting steel since before thet were born, but once they see you as a master craftsman they get in line. You teach them something and in return they teach you the computer stuff. A little backward from what we had as apprentices but these are different times. Yeah it really does sting to be the last of our kind and in many ways back-up regarding pay and all, but think about it this way, if it is the love of cutting steel and the smell of coolant in the morning that still calls after you, we need to change. Do not become down hearted, stand with your heads held high, shoulders back and a grin from ear to ear knowing that we helped build America one chip at a time.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (9) / No Reply - Report abuse

GCA in Mc Minnville, Tennessee

62 months ago

Jerry, iwould like to see someone start a TV show to let the country see you masters in action useing nothing but what is sitting on your shoulders for a print. I don't thank the country has a clue of the knowledge you guys have is gone the impact it is going to have on this country i've seen guys that claimed to be a machinist could not read a scale. I wish all of you the very best.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

Rie in Ottawa, Ontario

60 months ago

I'm helping my dad, a machinist with over 30 years experience, locate new work. Thanks again to corporate outsourcing and the decline of the forestry industry in BC his machine shop was driven out of business. He's interested in offshore work, has anyone on this forum heard of places to search for these kinds of positions?

Thank you in advance:)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Political Atheist in Arlington, Texas

58 months ago

mjohnson0001@hotmail.com in Kellerman, Alabama said: I have been in the machinist field for 34 years. In that time I have seen machinist pay rates not keep up with other skilled labor professions.Good job opportunities are hard to come by. I would suggest someone who is thinking of becoming a machinist go into something else. I will be working until I die because I cannot afford to retire. So Run away as fast as you can.You'll thank me later.

Sir, I couldn't agree more. I've been doing it for about 30 years and wish I had never walked into a machine shop. Once again I'm unemployed laid off since July 08. I have meet some of the most worthless, back stabbing, self centered, lying creep's whilst working in machine shops. I wish I knew what else to get in to. I don't know if I can stomach going back in to another one.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (5) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

mark daly in Markstay, Ontario

58 months ago

mjohnson0001@hotmail.com in Kellerman, Alabama said: I have been in the machinist field for 34 years. In that time I have seen machinist pay rates not keep up with other skilled labor professions.Good job opportunities are hard to come by. I would suggest someone who is thinking of becoming a machinist go into something else. I will be working until I die because I cannot afford to retire. So Run away as fast as you can.You'll thank me later.

i have also been 20 years in the trade in canada its no different up here
i suggest also to run from this trade

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

mark daly in Markstay, Ontario

58 months ago

Bryan Riley in Louisville, Kentucky said: Amen! I've been in the trade 13 yrs. and its over. I guess I will go be a nurse now, like my wife. She gets 5 to 6 calls a week people wanting her to come to work for them. Toolmaker to a Nurse, gotta do something.

good idea go for it

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

mark daly in Markstay, Ontario

58 months ago

Rie in Ottawa, Ontario said: I'm helping my dad, a machinist with over 30 years experience, locate new work. Thanks again to corporate outsourcing and the decline of the forestry industry in BC his machine shop was driven out of business. He's interested in offshore work, has anyone on this forum heard of places to search for these kinds of positions?

Thank you in advance:)

what kind of offshore work does he want as i am also looking for something
maybe similar .
i saw an ad for ofshore oil rigs 21 days on 21 days off paid
the age cut off is 50 years old.
i am 50 so i did not look any further as they proberbly would not hire,or if they did would kick me out in 4 months when i turn 51
google "off shore oil rig jobs".
good luck to all you fellow machinists.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

kustomizer in san andreas, California

57 months ago

For 30 some odd years I have been taking something big and reducing it to an attractively shaped precission something smaller. I have seen and done alot with not much because someone wanted it to be like the picture in their head. I began with a p.o.s. worn out atlas lathe in pops shop and now I am owned by a small machine shop with 8 CNC mills and lathes. I am at this time perplexed by the amount of machine shops going under as upposed to the lack of available qualified applicants looking for machining positions. I quit mu last job for many of the same reasons machining is bashed in many places, poor work conditions ( cold, dirty, bla, bla ) to start one of my own thinking I would be able to have 3 or 4 people working in the shop setting up machines and running parts while I worked on new products, fixtures and the such. Almost 20 years after buying my first CNC I am still in search of those 3 or 4 people, I imagine my location in the foothills of California, 5 miles from a goldrush ghosttown could be part of my problem, but I have found not only here but every shop owner in every state has the same trouble. Work ethics are not what they were, young folks don't seem to aquire skills as readily as I think they could and I believe this has a lot to do with their upbringing but that is a whole nuther can "o" worms. I work 10 to 12 hrs a day 6 to 7 days a week so my 3 employees can work 5 - 8 hour days. They say they want to learn but the fact remains, I have to set up the machines. I have tried to explain to folks for years that everything is easy once you know how, and that machining can't be all that hard or I wouldn't be able to do it. I have two, 1 guy and 1 gal that can kind of set up a repeat job if I throw enough of time at it with them, but it takes all day to do a setup that I could do in an hour and they don't get much better as time goes by. The parts we make are cosmetic, billet parts for hotrods and dirtbikes. How do I recrute some guy or gal to help me?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Bob Capalbo in New Baltimore, Michigan

57 months ago

I have over 35 years machining and need a good adventure

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

BLR in Bay Shore, New York

57 months ago

I'am a manual machinist for last 30 years.My fault I didn't learn CNC.I liked working with my hands and running different machines. Really didn't want to work on 1 type CNC.With last company 16 years,
good job great pay plenty OT.Out of work since May09.Going to community college to learn basic CNC.Can't find job as manual.Many small shops on Long Island, all CNC.Most not hiring anyway,or if they are won't pay.Hopefully one day soon it will turn and we will be in demand again.Used to be easy to find a job in this field.I worked for Fairchild Republic, and laid off in '82.Worked for Grumman
Aerospace, and quit before a layoff in '86.I was in the next place till it went out of business in '93.Last few years life got real easy and comfortable.Always made money in this trade here.Sucks starting over again.It will get better!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Bob Capalbo in New Baltimore, Michigan

57 months ago

There are lots of us in the same boat. My problem is I am 62 and I don't think it will turn around before I am too old to do any good.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

mark daly in markstay ont canada in Markstay, Ontario

56 months ago

kustomizer in san andreas, California said: For 30 some odd years I have been taking something big and reducing it to an attractively shaped precission something smaller. I have seen and done alot with not much because someone wanted it to be like the picture in their head. I began with a p.o.s. worn out atlas lathe in pops shop and now I am owned by a small machine shop with 8 CNC mills and lathes. I am at this time perplexed by the amount of machine shops going under as upposed to the lack of available qualified applicants looking for machining positions. I quit mu last job for many of the same reasons machining is bashed in many places, poor work conditions ( cold, dirty, bla, bla ) to start one of my own thinking I would be able to have 3 or 4 people working in the shop setting up machines and running parts while I worked on new products, fixtures and the such. Almost 20 years after buying my first CNC I am still in search of those 3 or 4 people, I imagine my location in the foothills of California, 5 miles from a goldrush ghosttown could be part of my problem, but I have found not only here but every shop owner in every state has the same trouble. Work ethics are not what they were, young folks don't seem to aquire skills as readily as I think they could and I believe this has a lot to do with their upbringing but that is a whole nuther can "o" worms. I work 10 to 12 hrs a day 6 to 7 days a week so my 3 employees can work 5 - 8 hour days. They say they want to learn but the fact remains, I have to set up the machines. I have tried to explain to folks for years that everything is easy once you know how, and that machining can't be all that hard or I wouldn't be able to do it. I have two, 1 guy and 1 gal that can kind of set up a repeat job if I throw enough of time at it with them, but it takes all day to do a setup that I could do in an hour and they don't get much better as time goes by. The parts we make are cosmetic, billet parts for hotrods and dirtb

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

mark daly in markstay ont canada in Markstay, Ontario

56 months ago

i would be interested in helping out as i am old school i only need to be shown once and i will remember for ever

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

boater in Trafford, Pennsylvania

56 months ago

try becoming a field machinist. 30.00 + an hour. got to beable to travel around and set up portable machines.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

jackie garrett in Guntersville, Alabama

56 months ago

I'm a female machinist in Alabama and would love to find work in Texas. I have an Associates Degree and 5+ years shop experience. I have set-up and operated Cincinnati 3, 4, and 5 axis vertical and horizontal mills, Haas, and Fadal. I am very familiar with Fanuc, Mazatrol, and Siemens 850, 980, and 2100 controls. I would love to hear from anyone that could help me! jackiegarrett@live.com

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

jackie garrett in Guntersville, Alabama

56 months ago

I am a female machinist in Huntsville, Alabama. I love what I do and would love to find work in Texas. I have experience with Fanuc, Mazatrol, and Siemens 850, 950. and 2100 controls. I have run 3, 4, and 5 axis Cincinnati and Haas. If you know of any openings in Texas please contact me. jackiegarrett@live.com

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

machinisttoo in Greensboro, North Carolina

55 months ago

Jerry in Asheboro, North Carolina said: I just fell victim to the layoff demon(again). I have been cutting steel since 1972 (in a Vocational High School, anyone still remeber those?). I have moved from New York to Texas back to New York, and down to North Carolina from starting work in the job shops and manufacturing companies. I am an "Old School Die Hard Toolmaker". Just like so many (or so few of us left) I can make anything that a person can dream up or tell me what they want it to do, using the manual machines. Today it is all CNC / CAD. I have attended classes on the new machines but my past employer did not have them in the shop, or if they did get one in a department it was only used by "specalists" or "technicians". At 50 years old I find myself for all practicle purposes "obsolete". Amazing how after all these years I find myself with this "now what" problem. This old dog has chased the "rabbit" a good long ways, tried to keep up, even have two AS Degrees and international experience but it seems the search this time will be a lot longer and harder. Years ago it meant moving around the country to keep working, today it requires turning back the hands of time or so it seems. I want to wish everyone who reads this the best of luck continuing in the trade and good hunting to those who like me are searching for a place where they understand what and who a real toolmaker is and capable of doing.

Jerry you are so wright. I have somewhat your background(Randolph Com. College, Alamance Com. College, Davidson County Com. College) and cant find work...

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

Jerry in Asheboro, North Carolina

55 months ago

Hello machinisttoo in Greensboro,

Sorry that you are having as much trouble as I am. Things are tougher now than they were when I left New York over 20 years ago. The longer this trouble lasts the harder we need to work at sharpening our skills. I have just finished the CNC Milling 2 class and a Welding course at Randolph Commumity College and now I am taking the CAD/CAM class.

A few months ago a company called Grass America in Kernersville or there abouts seemed interested in getting a few new hires. I talked with them and sent them what they wanted but have not heard from them since. If you are up in Greensboro anyway you might stop in and see them, can't hurt to try.

Seems there is not very much going on in the tooling world around here. Best of luck to you.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

micky62172 in Patchogue, New York

55 months ago

I'm in nursing school now here on Long Island, NY. Former home of Grumman Corp., Republic Aircraft, Moniter Aerospace, Eaton AIL, huge companies who once hired thousands of machinists. I Graduated from The Tooling and Machining Institute of NY in '84. We thought at that time we maybe wouldn't get rich, but would always have a job. I remember two columns of "machimist wanted" ads in Sunday papers. This week zero ads. I love the trade, but I give up.
Mike W. Long Island NY

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

bobal in Buffalo, New York

55 months ago

I have also been a machinist for over 30 years and I have to tell ya that it sucks! I work my balls off and it's never enought! I quit being a machinist for about 5 years and worked with repairing computers. I about doubled my saley in the first year! I worked for adelpha witch closed and went to time worner. Every one was head hunted to I quit befor I got the axe and went back to being a machinist. Big mistake! I should have stayed with computers!

mjohnson0001@hotmail.com in Kellerman, Alabama said: I have been in the machinist field for 34 years. In that time I have seen machinist pay rates not keep up with other skilled labor professions.Good job opportunities are hard to come by. I would suggest someone who is thinking of becoming a machinist go into something else. I will be working until I die because I cannot afford to retire. So Run away as fast as you can.You'll thank me later.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No Reply - Report abuse

micky in Patchogue, New York

55 months ago

Well, love for the trade doesn't help you at the grocery store. By the way, I would take you a little more seriously if you knew how to spell machinist.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

vulcan in Volcano, California

55 months ago

I do know how to spell machinist, but my fingers don't. No one has ever taken me seriously, but i am eating and thriving in paradise on machinists wages as they are. Is food expensive on Long Island micky in Patchogue?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (5) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

micky in Patchogue, New York

55 months ago

Yes, food and everything else is pricey here on Long Island. Ranks right up there with the most expensive places to live in the nation. Yep, Long Island born and raised, I remember when Grumman Corp., Republic Aircraft, Monitor Aerospace, Eaton AIL, Dorne & Margolin all fought over us, machinists, everything was conventional machining, early 80's and all the 70's. It was booming. All those companies are gone, every one of them closed or merged and moved. My point to you was, guys love the trade, but the jobs are not here. Companies that do hire, pay laughable wages because there are still many good machinists here. I'm 47, I caught the tail end of the boom. I'm set to graduate nursing school in the Spring. I will make at least $27/hr to start. A top CNC/conventional foreman maybe gets that here. Times change, I chose to change with them. Not because I wanted things to be this way. Blame the morons who have chosen to destroy our nation's manufacturing capabilities. It's a disgrace.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

vulcan in Volcano, California

55 months ago

I also worked on Long Island in the late 80s and early 90s, Lived on the North Fork. I left the S.F bay area to presue arospace work.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

mikanally in Toronto, Ontario

54 months ago

I'm discovering that in this industry you really have to stand out in the skills department to get noticed. That means you must be able to set up and run both conventional and CNC as well as program them yourself. It seems that nobody in this town is willing to take a junior machinist like me. I work more as a non-machinist then I ever have as a machinist.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Page:   1  2  3  Next »   Last »

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.