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What is the best training for becoming a hirable machinist? What types of ongoing training or certifications are necessary to be an effective machinist?

What do non-traditional career paths look like?

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Dan in Everett, Washington

87 months ago

Take six months on EBAY purchasing tools like. Indicators Micrometers cutting tools etc. Go after lots and such they are the best bargain. There is no substitute for experience so expect to make minimum wage knowing that in 10 years you will be worth 300% more.

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shadow in Portland, Oregon

65 months ago

Host said: What is the best training for becoming a hirable machinist? What types of ongoing training or certifications are necessary to be an effective machinist?

What do non-traditional career paths look like?

Traditional Career paths in the Machinist trade tend to lean more and more to CNC Not Manual anymore If you really want to make good money in the field Set out to find and know all you can about Programming take the classes read the books and do your homework , Good Manual Machinists like myself are dying out here in Portland and all over the Northwest as CNC's get easier to program , Even the one off parts are being done on CNCs now. GOOD LUCK shadow

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Spinnerslinger in Sandy, Oregon

63 months ago

I can't say enough about apprenticeships, I think for all intents and purposes the apprenticeship programs by far the best way to go. Try and find a company that has an apprenticeship program for the type of machinist you want to become and then you will find it easier to learn the different phases of machining, whether it be CNC, EDM, Manual, Screw or even Production\Job shop Machinist. All these are different jobs are considered (machinist Jobs). But apprenticeships will most likely to be Tool and Die Maker which is the best way to go. Job shop machinist jobs are usually based on how fast you can get a part from print to part. They want you be able to receive a print, draw it, program it, set it up and machine it in less than four hours or less. Building tools is very different. Tools need to designed built and worked out and timed for optimal production. A progressive die is struck 600 times a minute and some are faster and some are slower but you have to be extremely accurate when building these dies. Then consider what job is most suitable to you. Die Maker or Production Machinist. Which one do you think you would like the most.

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phantom717 in Taylors, South Carolina

63 months ago

looks like we should all band together and start our
own company.

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phantom717 in Taylors, South Carolina

63 months ago

good luck

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shadow in Portland, Oregon

63 months ago

yes apprenticeship programs are good if you can find a company willing to train you, as for colleges you can learn a lot of theory and a little hands on practice there , but nothing will ever take the place of on the job training in a job shop or repair facility such as Hydraulic repairs. You're working with fits and sizes learning what the repair part of the Machinist Trade really is. In short the way you learn and gather Experience is by doing it. I was very fortunate to have learned the way I did I doubt there are many shops around like that anymore. CNCs have just about taken over.

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phantom717 in Taylors, South Carolina

63 months ago

tech schools and text books are good.from experieance, on the job is the best school in the world.it takes time,but once you learn the basics, the sky is the limit.once you learn,it will come natural as riding a bike.

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Allen in Santa Rosa, California

25 months ago

shadow in Portland, Oregon said: Traditional Career paths in the Machinist trade tend to lean more and more to CNC Not Manual anymore If you really want to make good money in the field Set out to find and know all you can about Programming take the classes read the books and do your homework , Good Manual Machinists like myself are dying out here in Portland and all over the Northwest as CNC's get easier to program , Even the one off parts are being done on CNCs now. GOOD LUCK shadow

Recently, I have been seeing a need, or should I say, a demand for manual machinist. I myself am a dying breed out her in Calif.I do both cnc, and manual. I had my pick between 3 shops. I say don't neglect the manual training. Get both! So many cnc guys need to know the basics about machining. Thanks, Allen Calif.

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shadow in Portland, Oregon

25 months ago

You're totally right Allen only thing is, 60% of the shops here in Portland that would train a young machinist are gone and what is left are a lot of CNC companies. But all the best of luck to anyone wanting to learn on the job.

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