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Host

What are the top 3 traits or skills every machinist must have to excel?

Can you suggest any tips or insights to develop your machinist expertise?

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David Love in Columbia, South Carolina

94 months ago

Host said: What are the top 3 traits or skills every machinist must have to excel?
Can you suggest any tips or insights to develop your machinist expertise?

The three main traits required to be the best are 1. Never ASSUME anything, be sure.
2. Use your brain as a tool, ask yourself all pertinent questions to resolve what needs to be done prior to starting any work. Always plan ahead, no matter how large or small the job is. 3. Be professional in all aspects of your job, ie;
always be punctual, reliable, knowlegable and a team player.

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Mark in Renton, Washington

73 months ago

Host said: What are the top 3 traits or skills every machinist must have to excel?

Can you suggest any tips or insights to develop your machinist expertise?

1. Learn geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (ANSI 14.5)
2. Learn trigonometry
3. Learn speeds and feeds for various materials in different conditions.

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md.carter112@yahoo.com math in Bound Brook, New Jersey

71 months ago

Host said: What are the top 3 traits or skills every machinist must have to excel?

Can you suggest any tips or insights to develop your machinist expertise?

math for the machinist needs

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Jethro Hilligan in Alamosa, Colorado

70 months ago

1. Pride! Pride in what you do. Pride in what you know. Proud of your skills and ability. I have never known a decent machinist that didn't think he was the best handle cranker ever born.

2. Ask. Every machinist I have ever known is more than happy to share his knowledge and advice. Don't be afraid to ASK! It's easier to ask than to scrap lots of iron and look for another job.

3. I have to disagree with 'Thick-Skinned' on buying your own tools. If you use someone else's tools, you don't know how they've been treated, if they are accurate, or if they are junk. Remember, it is your livelihood, and your reputation that are at stake. If you scrap something, you can't blame it on the company mics; YOU are responsible. Don't try to buy everything at once. Buy as you need it. My general rule-of-thumb was if I needed it more than once or twice a year, I'd buy one. And buy the best you can afford, you won't regret it.

Always keep in mind that everything you touch, a machinist was there first; whether is was building the actual item, or the machines the item was built with.

I used to gripe about always getting the bad jobs. I never got the 'gravy', just the jobs that kept you humped up and bent over, worrying every minute that I was going to kill it. Finally an old timer asked me if I ever wondered why I got the bad jobs and I told him it was because the foreman didn't like me and was trying to make me quit. He said, "No; it's because you can do it". That's when I really began to take pride in what I did.

If being a machinist was easy, the hamburger flippers would be doing it. Be proud of what you do.

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tony in Newburyport, Massachusetts

70 months ago

Jethro Hilligan in Alamosa, Colorado said: 1. Pride! Pride in what you do. Pride in what you know. Proud of your skills and ability. I have never known a decent machinist that didn't think he was the best handle cranker ever born.

2. Ask. Every machinist I have ever known is more than happy to share his knowledge and advice. Don't be afraid to ASK! It's easier to ask than to scrap lots of iron and look for another job.

3. I have to disagree with 'Thick-Skinned' on buying your own tools. If you use someone else's tools, you don't know how they've been treated, if they are accurate, or if they are junk. Remember, it is your livelihood, and your reputation that are at stake. If you scrap something, you can't blame it on the company mics; YOU are responsible. Don't try to buy everything at once. Buy as you need it. My general rule-of-thumb was if I needed it more than once or twice a year, I'd buy one. And buy the best you can afford, you won't regret it.

Always keep in mind that everything you touch, a machinist was there first; whether is was building the actual item, or the machines the item was built with.

I used to gripe about always getting the bad jobs. I never got the 'gravy', just the jobs that kept you humped up and bent over, worrying every minute that I was going to kill it. Finally an old timer asked me if I ever wondered why I got the bad jobs and I told him it was because the foreman didn't like me and was trying to make me quit. He said, "No; it's because you can do it". That's when I really began to take pride in what I did.

If being a machinist was easy, the hamburger flippers would be doing it. Be proud of what you do.

i agree completly.

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Thanks Tony in Alamosa, Colorado

70 months ago

As a crippledy-a$$ old machinist, I needed that.

Made my whole day for me.

Now I'mm off to see the Doc about getting a new knee that has been pounded in to mush from walking on concrete for 40 years.

I hope to buy you a cup of coffee and a good cigar someday.

Dick

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kelhdriver in Mount Prospect, Illinois

61 months ago

Jethro Hilligan in Alamosa, Colorado said: 1. Pride! Pride in what you do. Pride in what you know. Proud of your skills and ability. I have never known a decent machinist that didn't think he was the best handle cranker ever born.

2. Ask. Every machinist I have ever known is more than happy to share his knowledge and advice. Don't be afraid to ASK! It's easier to ask than to scrap lots of iron and look for another job.

3. I have to disagree with 'Thick-Skinned' on buying your own tools. If you use someone else's tools, you don't know how they've been treated, if they are accurate, or if they are junk. Remember, it is your livelihood, and your reputation that are at stake. If you scrap something, you can't blame it on the company mics; YOU are responsible. Don't try to buy everything at once. Buy as you need it. My general rule-of-thumb was if I needed it more than once or twice a year, I'd buy one. And buy the best you can afford, you won't regret it.

Always keep in mind that everything you touch, a machinist was there first; whether is was building the actual item, or the machines the item was built with.

I used to gripe about always getting the bad jobs. I never got the 'gravy', just the jobs that kept you humped up and bent over, worrying every minute that I was going to kill it. Finally an old timer asked me if I ever wondered why I got the bad jobs and I told him it was because the foreman didn't like me and was trying to make me quit. He said, "No; it's because you can do it". That's when I really began to take pride in what I did.

If being a machinist was easy, the hamburger flippers would be doing it. Be proud of what you do.

I have to agree with you on this. There are varying degrees of skills in our department. Some can work FAST. some work slow. Some get the intricate jobs done and can pull off miracles. I have never complained about the job I get because I have been told that some do better than others at tight tolerences

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kelhdriver in Mount Prospect, Illinois

61 months ago

Host said: What are the top 3 traits or skills every machinist must have to excel?

Can you suggest any tips or insights to develop your machinist expertise?

Patience, analytical skills,and an ability to look at something in a different paradigm.(Outside the box)math and heat treat knowledge is good also. As far as tools are concerned, I have to agree that you have as many as you can afford, because your job is at stake and there are always clown in the shop who would love to get over on you and make you look bad.
I personally have seen gageblocks used as a tooling point. I cringe at the thought of it every time but that is how stupid some people are.They drill into the 1-2-3 blocks, I would rather have my own, I know what they are capable of and I have no qualms about working in .0001 or less. In 1978 I paid 120 dollars for my Dial calipers. A kid who has more money than sense has bought 13 sets of ELECTRONIC calipers since he has been in the department for 10 years. My calipers are still accurate. Good tools = GOOD WORK. GOOD ATTITUDE, WORK ETHICS, all come into play.

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oldtimer9963 in Cincinnati, Ohio

56 months ago

how to to grind 40 mill taper

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oldtimer9963 in Cincinnati, Ohio

56 months ago

looking to start a grinding shop

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Roflmfao in Jackson, Tennessee

35 months ago

Thick skinned & livid in Prinsenbeek, Netherlands said: 1.) A warped sense of humour for example:-- when the unskilled imbecile foreman,/boss's asks "can you read micrometers and verniers" and "can you read drawings & blue-prints" "do you know how to work a lathe & vertical Boring Mill",...after you have been doing machining for 35 years,..(sometimes for Rolls Royce)
answer Errrrrrrrrrrrrrr YES I can,..(except on Saturdays & Sundays when I'm sh*gging the wife)

2.) Be a tight-wad miser,..never buy any of your own tools, measuring equipment when working in the USA or Canada,..as that is the scrooge-bag Managers responsibility . I don't provide my own Lathe & Milling machines, coolant, cranes etc,..
why the hell should I be expected to buy my own tools TO MAKE YOU a fat profit

3.)Never trust ANY hypocrite American boss's or sly USA companies Human Resources Departments,/staff when they say they "like your work",..and they "cannot get skilled people anywhere" then smile in your face,..while all the time stabbing you in the back and finish you up 2 weeks later,...after they shake your hands,/praise you to high heaven,..and pocket all the money-profit you made for them
Then they send you sh*tty emails anonimously

Welcome to the wonderful world of Job Shops :)

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jun.aparri in Cagayan De Oro, Philippines

28 months ago

Host said: What are the top 3 traits or skills every machinist must have to excel?

Can you suggest any tips or insights to develop your machinist expertise?

A Machinist Knows to read measuring Instrument, knows to weld and align,and can operate standard Machine shop tools.

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