Anything Positve to say about Massage Therapy???

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BrittShiv in Colorado Springs, Colorado

57 months ago

Sabeena is right. You have to own a business (spa, salon, wellness center, etc.) and have employees to make a decent income these days. But, right now, the economy has everyone in a choke hold. So if you are thinking of opening a business, be sure to do your research. Massage is so over-saturated in some areas that it's hard to keep regular clients OR employees/subcontractors.

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Sabeena in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

57 months ago

BrittShiv in Colorado Springs, Colorado said: Sabeena is right. You have to own a business (spa, salon, wellness center, etc.) and have employees to make a decent income these days. But, right now, the economy has everyone in a choke hold. So if you are thinking of opening a business, be sure to do your research. Massage is so over-saturated in some areas that it's hard to keep regular clients OR employees/subcontractors.

My dearest friend lives in a town where there are 4 massage businesses on every corner. That's not an exaggeration. There are over 200 listings in her zip code, and she figures for every listing there are 2 others who aren't listed, like her. But she keeps regular clients with her outstanding customer service skills. They're rabidly loyal to her. It is possible, but again very difficult.

I worked for myself renting space at a high-end gym before opening my own spa. I worked 4 days a week and netted around $40K (after expenses). That's a pretty decent living for part-time work.

I pay my employees $36 an hour plus tips which average $9 per hour. They do an average of 18 massages a week which means they make close to $40 but don't have to pay for rent, business cards, do marketing, laundry, cleaning, insurance billing, appointments or any of the other sh*t work like that. Plus I pay for a decent health insurance plan, 2 weeks of vacation and CEUs. Not too shabby.

That's why that scumbag Gray Neher must be lying about how much ME employees earn. It takes around $45/hour to make his reported $30-$45K. ABZ is correct, it must be around $28K.

Honestly, I don't know any other employer who pays as well or offers benefits to their MTs like I do. I've read about some on this board, so good employers exist. I have waiting lists with dozens of names of fantastic MTs who will work with me at the drop of a hat.

It's just darned near impossible to find. You have to make it for yourself. It's not much fun.

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Nunya Beezwax in Dallas, Texas

57 months ago

I don't get it. You claim to be doing well but don't really like it or think it's much fun? Why keep doing it?

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Sabeena in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

57 months ago

Nunya Beezwax in Dallas, Texas said: I don't get it. You claim to be doing well but don't really like it or think it's much fun? Why keep doing it?

I massaged to put myself through college and only went back to it after my company went bankrupt. It was the largest employer in the state of Oklahoma. My INTENT was to massage as a temporary solution until I found a real job again in technology.

The tech jobs went away but the damned massage clients kept flocking to me. I didn't want to open a spa, but my uncle gave me money to start it so he could get regular spa treatments. My INTENT was to build it and sell it. The investors are nowhere to be found but plenty of massage clients are still stalking me. ARGGGGHHH!

I enjoy marketing, business building and technology. Massage is OK, but I don't love it. I detest laundry, insurance billing, and cleaning. I am a businessperson at heart and have very few lofty, romantic ideas about spirituality or healing or any of the touchy-feely ideals other people get into massage for.

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Tracy in Las Vegas, Nevada

57 months ago

Sabeena in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma said: I massaged to put myself through college and only went back to it after my company went bankrupt. It was the largest employer in the state of Oklahoma. My INTENT was to massage as a temporary solution until I found a real job again in technology.

Massage IS a real job! I'm annoyed by your complaining about having a successful business but educated by the story. I need business skills. I keep reading over and over again that business and customer service skills are the key to a successful massage practice, not necessarily how well you massage.

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Sabeena in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

57 months ago

Tracy in Las Vegas, Nevada said: Massage IS a real job! I'm annoyed by your complaining about having a successful business but educated by the story. I need business skills. I keep reading over and over again that business and customer service skills are the key to a successful massage practice, not necessarily how well you massage.

Yes, massage is a real job for others. It doesn't suit my self-image, I don't like it or want to do it, so it doesn't feel like a real job for me.

Here's my message to the massage community: It doesn't really matter what your "subconscious beliefs" are. I know being a MT violates my "subconscious beliefs" because I feel bad doing it.

Don't waste your time figuring out your subconscious beliefs or what you want to do. JUST DO IT. Your subconscious beliefs will be revealed to you during the process, so you can make adjustments as you go along. My "secrets" can all be found in the Guerilla Marketing series: gmarketing.com. It's perfect for anyone, whether you want to be an employee, independent contractor or spa owner.

And no, I won't teach or write about it. It's perfect and waiting for whoever wants it. I would be an arrogant a$$ to presume I have any more to bring to the table than already exists.

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thebodyworker in Seattle, Washington

57 months ago

Actually you don't quite understand unconscious beliefs. They are what are causing the bad feelings. Anytime you are feeling anything other than love or joy you can know it is your unconscious beliefs showing up. Things don't violate your unconscious beliefs. Your unconscious beliefs are the beliefs that tell you things like you are not good enough or some variation of that.

If you feel bad doing massage, you can change the feeling if you so choose or you can just keep buying into the old belief system. Since you can't change your feelings easily it is easier to just start changing your thoughts.

If you have such a successful massage business then why are you so unhappy doing massage? Your complaints about the profession are telling you what you do want - Focus on what you want changes the bad feelings. There is much wisdom in complaining.

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BrittShiv in Colorado Springs, Colorado

57 months ago

Sabeena in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma said: Yes, massage is a real job for others. It doesn't suit my self-image, I don't like it or want to do it, so it doesn't feel like a real job for me.

Here's my message to the massage community: It doesn't really matter what your "subconscious beliefs" are. I know being a MT violates my "subconscious beliefs" because I feel bad doing it.

Don't waste your time figuring out your subconscious beliefs or what you want to do. JUST DO IT. Your subconscious beliefs will be revealed to you during the process, so you can make adjustments as you go along. My "secrets" can all be found in the Guerilla Marketing series: gmarketing.com. It's perfect for anyone, whether you want to be an employee, independent contractor or spa owner.

And no, I won't teach or write about it. It's perfect and waiting for whoever wants it. I would be an arrogant a$$ to presume I have any more to bring to the table than already exists.

Please don't tell me you're selling the gmarketing.com series... NOOOOooooo!!! lol Or did you just pay for the $20,000 master training and succeeded in the spa industry that way?

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Sabeena in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

57 months ago

BrittShiv in Colorado Springs, Colorado said: Please don't tell me you're selling the gmarketing.com series... NOOOOooooo!!! lol Or did you just pay for the $20,000 master training and succeeded in the spa industry that way?

Now how long did it take me to reveal my "secret"? I've been on this board about a year and never spoke of it! I don't know anything about the 20,000 master training. I just read the books. They were part of my master's curriculum.

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Sabeena in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

57 months ago

Now I see. I had no idea about the master training. No, no, no, don't even think about that. The $15 books on Amazon will do, and working with a mentor is better.

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BrittShiv in Colorado Springs, Colorado

57 months ago

Sabeena in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma said: Now I see. I had no idea about the master training. No, no, no, don't even think about that. The $15 books on Amazon will do, and working with a mentor is better.

Oh, I see... Just wanted to make sure you weren't yet another savvy business person trying to pry even more unnecessary funds out of the fists of hopeful new broke massage therapists in this awful economy.

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Massage No More in Hyattsville, Maryland

56 months ago

Massage is a hobby not a career and it is most certainly not a profession.

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abodyworker in Las Vegas, Nevada

56 months ago

Massage No More in Hyattsville, Maryland said: Massage is a hobby not a career and it is most certainly not a profession.

Why do you say that? (I think I might agree with you, BTW!)

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thebodyworker in Seattle, Washington

56 months ago

Whether massage is a career or a hobby depends on how you approach it - just like any other career. If you want to just do it part time you can. If you want to do it professionally and be a professional you can. You can get involved in professional organizations to help it grow as a profession. There is much being done right now as far as licensing and legislation and the creation of the Federation of Massage State Boards that will help take it to the next level.

I think part of the problem really is that the average age of massage therapists was 45 years old until a few years ago when massage schools started going after the younger crowd to fill their classes so that they could fill the low paying ME jobs.
Since it was mainly adults and people over 34-40 going to massage school it assumes that you know how to use critical thinking skills and act professionally so they don't teach it much in school. I think with the way things are going you will soon see massage being a 3-4 year program so it can adapt to the younger people's needs for more training.

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George Borg in Warren, Michigan

56 months ago

thebodyworker in Seattle, Washington said: Whether massage is a career or a hobby depends on how you approach it - just like any other career. If you want to just do it part time you can. If you want to do it professionally and be a professional you can. You can get involved in professional organizations to help it grow as a profession. There is much being done right now as far as licensing and legislation and the creation of the Federation of Massage State Boards that will help take it to the next level.

I think part of the problem really is that the average age of massage therapists was 45 years old until a few years ago when massage schools started going after the younger crowd to fill their classes so that they could fill the low paying ME jobs.
Since it was mainly adults and people over 34-40 going to massage school it assumes that you know how to use critical thinking skills and act professionally so they don't teach it much in school. I think with the way things are going you will soon see massage being a 3-4 year program so it can adapt to the younger people's needs for more training.

I really don't see that as reality. The only common thread I've experienced between associations and licensing is that they each want to get a cut of your profits. Licensing sounds like a good idea until you find that they do nothing to protect the industry quality, they just want their check.

I also doubt that massage schools were taking in younger students to take lower paying positions. Many advertise that "you too can go to school for a year and start earning great money!" HA! Eventually, the field was so full of massage therapists that competition made it very hard to make a living. The schools have no problem taking in more students because their only concern is profits from tuition.

The average massage therapist career lasts 7 years. It may be different in the northwest, but here in the Detroit area its a different story.

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Sabeena in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

56 months ago

George Borg in Warren, Michigan said: I really don't see that as reality. The only common thread I've experienced between associations and licensing is that they each want to get a cut of your profits. Licensing sounds like a good idea until you find that they do nothing to protect the industry quality, they just want their check.

I also doubt that massage schools were taking in younger students to take lower paying positions. Many advertise that "you too can go to school for a year and start earning great money!" HA! Eventually, the field was so full of massage therapists that competition made it very hard to make a living. The schools have no problem taking in more students because their only concern is profits from tuition.

Agreed. Regulation and associations in my experience LOWER the quality standards...not that national standards for massage can be any lower! Before the state regulated massage, in OK we had 4 levels of training (none was required to practice massage): apprenticeship training, the basic 600 hours to be considered a technician, a 2000 hour program to be considered a para-professional, and a 4 year program to work in therapeutic settings along side PTs and OTs.

Now that OK is just CONSIDERING following the national standards of requiring a paltry 600 hours of education, guess what more people are opting to do? Yes, the minimum 600 hours! Schools are finding it difficult to recruit students into the longer programs because after all, the NATIONAL requirements are only 500 hours, so that must be good enough.

I completely support Oklahoma's hands-off approach with VOLUNTARY education and certification. I had 2000 hours of basic training and certification in advanced modalities including Myoskeletal Alignment and Hanna Somatics.

KEEP STANDARDS HIGH BY KEEPING GOVERNMENT OUT OF YOUR BUSINESS!

I think career length is 7 years anywhere you go. It's a hard, sweaty, nasty thing to do with your life...

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George Borg in Warren, Michigan

56 months ago

Sabeena in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma said: Agreed. Regulation and associations in my experience LOWER the quality standards...not that national standards for massage can be any lower! Before the state regulated massage, in OK we had 4 levels of training (none was required to practice massage): apprenticeship training, the basic 600 hours to be considered a technician, a 2000 hour program to be considered a para-professional, and a 4 year program to work in therapeutic settings along side PTs and OTs.

Now that OK is just CONSIDERING following the national standards of requiring a paltry 600 hours of education, guess what more people are opting to do? Yes, the minimum 600 hours! Schools are finding it difficult to recruit students into the longer programs because after all, the NATIONAL requirements are only 500 hours, so that must be good enough.

I completely support Oklahoma's hands-off approach with VOLUNTARY education and certification. I had 2000 hours of basic training and certification in advanced modalities including Myoskeletal Alignment and Hanna Somatics.

KEEP STANDARDS HIGH BY KEEPING GOVERNMENT OUT OF YOUR BUSINESS!

I think career length is 7 years anywhere you go. It's a hard, sweaty, nasty thing to do with your life...

Michigan just started a state licensing this spring, and before that every city had their own licensing, so it was a mess. I believe the only reason the state started in was to get the money. Theoretically, you could practice without an education in some cities, while others outright forbade it.

I went to school and got national certification, but it doesn't mean anything when escorts and prostitutes are allowed to do the same thing (with a happy ending).

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SLM1 in Hazel Dell, Washington

56 months ago

Sorry but I just joined the crowd that says Don't Massage. As a recent graduate with previous business experience I was all excited to get going with my own business. The county put a stop to all my dreams. I can't open without complying with impossible ADA and building permit requirements. I won't degrade myself by working for Massage Envy. Government regulations are choking us and only getting worse. Used to be they only picked on high dollar professionals like doctors but now the little guys like us are targets too. The one guy here is dead on, Obamacare will finish off any remaining shred of hope for independence. The American dream is dead.

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George Borg in Warren, Michigan

56 months ago

Actually, I'm a big supporter of a single payer health plan (Lyme Disease since 1998, and still dealing with the symptoms and bills). Besides that though, I agree that regulation is killing the massage therapist.

When I first started, I contacted my city to learn what their rules were for massage. I was given an application to work in adult entertainment, had to have a background check, interviewed by the sheriff's department, check by the health department, etc. All of that doesn't even count building rules (a separate room and bathroom for males and females, zoning restrictions, etc.).

My school and others have been pushing for a state license for years, but it seems that what they also want is to put some schools out of business because they don't teach the same things. It sounds good at first, but in practice I have my doubts.

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mirabella in Fort Lee, New Jersey

56 months ago

In response to your fustration about the massage industry, I have to say , I also refuse to get paid manimun wage to work for a franchise,and or 15 per hr ONLY when theres clients. Im currently working at a pt office but barerly making ends meet. ALthough this will only be a temporary financial dilema, the bills continue to collect dust. The best advice to all out there is,no matter what youre age or financial situation may be, Start thinking of a new career for yourself. If massage therapy and helping others is youre true passion in life, you can continue, but just do it partime. its a VERY physical job! If youre considering school,research somethingthat you can get a degree in the medical field!

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Kay in Dayton, Ohio

56 months ago

Massage No More in Hyattsville, Maryland said: Massage is a hobby not a career and it is most certainly not a profession.

Right. Thats why this billion dollar industry exist. That's why docters perscribe it to thier patients. Why people take time out of thier schedules to pay me. To perform a hobby? Are you kidding me. Get informed. You need to read up on A&P and realize how massage influences ALL of the functions of the body. In my state of Ohio, massage is a limited branch of medicine which requires a medical license. And, I might mention that only about 30% of people pass it. So if massage is just a hobby, than I must be an excellent hobbyist. Because myself and thousands of other PROFESSIONALS make a good living off something that started as a hobby!

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George Borg in Warren, Michigan

56 months ago

Kay in Dayton, Ohio said: Right. Thats why this billion dollar industry exist. That's why docters perscribe it to thier patients. Why people take time out of thier schedules to pay me. To perform a hobby? Are you kidding me. Get informed. You need to read up on A&P and realize how massage influences ALL of the functions of the body. In my state of Ohio, massage is a limited branch of medicine which requires a medical license. And, I might mention that only about 30% of people pass it. So if massage is just a hobby, than I must be an excellent hobbyist. Because myself and thousands of other PROFESSIONALS make a good living off something that started as a hobby!

I'm in the Detroit area, and admittedly don't know what the laws are in Ohio regarding massage. Frankly, I've NEVER had a client that was prescribed massage by a doctor here. Massage is also not covered by medical insurance (unless performed in a chiropractor's office). Yes, I understand how massage influences most functions of the body, which is why I first got into it, but that doesn't pay the bills. Most people would rather pop a few aspirins for pain than pay for a massage, typically out of pocket.
Congratulations if you're able to make a healthy living from massage, but I believe you're obviously an exception to the rule. I really find it hard to believe that massage is doing so well in Ohio when their economy isn't much better than Michigan's. I also find that there are many therapists out there that will tell you that "their business is doing great, it must be you."

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thebodyworker in Seattle, Washington

56 months ago

Did you ever contact doctors to ask them to refer to you and show them the research that makes massage a legitimate profession?

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George Borg in Warren, Michigan

56 months ago

Kay in Dayton, Ohio said: Right. Thats why this billion dollar industry exist. That's why docters perscribe it to thier patients. Why people take time out of thier schedules to pay me. To perform a hobby? Are you kidding me. Get informed. You need to read up on A&P and realize how massage influences ALL of the functions of the body. In my state of Ohio, massage is a limited branch of medicine which requires a medical license. And, I might mention that only about 30% of people pass it. So if massage is just a hobby, than I must be an excellent hobbyist. Because myself and thousands of other PROFESSIONALS make a good living off something that started as a hobby!

I just looked at Ohio's licensing program, and don't see anything about needing a medical license, in fact, it doesn't look any different than any other state with a licensing program. From what you've said, I can only assume that the motive behind your statement is similar to that of a massage school. What you stated reminds me of the stuff they constantly pushed when I went to school.

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George Borg in Warren, Michigan

56 months ago

thebodyworker in Seattle, Washington said: Did you ever contact doctors to ask them to refer to you and show them the research that makes massage a legitimate profession?

In Michigan, once again, Massage Therapy is not covered by insurance unless performed in a chiropractor or doctor office. Money talks, and when its not covered by insurance, people that are tight on money aren't going to pay for something that they think can be fixed with a pill.
This is also the Detroit area, not the northwest. Opinions towards massage are that it's an extra, not necessary. I could try to promote massage left and right, and it wouldn't get anywhere here. Besides all that, I studied to be a massage therapist, not a lobbyist for massage, giving out free massage, writing books and blogs, and all the other crazy stuff that's been suggested.

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thebodyworker in Seattle, Washington

56 months ago

No promotions probably won't work in your area - educating people will. I send letters to doctors with a few of the most resent research studies and have a section on my website for physicians only to educate them first. Yes we have people who are more open about massage-it is something that should be studied. I am originally from western NY where they are really behind in accepting massage. I probably would have never become a massage therapist if I had stayed there.

Yes everyone just seems to want to do massage but not do the work that is needed to get it to be accepted more or to get the clients that they do need.

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George Borg in Warren, Michigan

56 months ago

thebodyworker in Seattle, Washington said: No promotions probably won't work in your area - educating people will. I send letters to doctors with a few of the most resent research studies and have a section on my website for physicians only to educate them first. Yes we have people who are more open about massage-it is something that should be studied. I am originally from western NY where they are really behind in accepting massage. I probably would have never become a massage therapist if I had stayed there.

Yes everyone just seems to want to do massage but not do the work that is needed to get it to be accepted more or to get the clients that they do need.

Yea, maybe you're right, we're all just lazy, that's it. Stupid me listened to the typical rhetoric from the schools that tell people about how it's a great field and you can get a job anywhere. Even though I'm against it, I can kind of sympathize with the girl that went to school and sued because she couldn't find work. It gets tiring hearing these trade schools making unreasonable claims.

I could try to educate people here about massage until I'm blue in the face, but it comes down to one thing, money. With an unemployment rate over 15%, and insurance not covering massage for those that still have it, it's like hitting a brick wall (I sometimes wonder if this is how chiropractor's felt before they started getting insurance to cover their work).

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Kay in Dayton, Ohio

56 months ago

Ohio was the first state to make massage therapy a limited branch medicine. Which means you can't practice as a hobby, you can't call your self a therapist, you can't knead a shoulder for pay unless you pass an exam given by the state medical board. Period. End of story. Your state just NOW pssed a law to require state licensing and is trying to figure out what YOUR scope of practice Should be.
So you see, our states are not even alike in the simple of terms. You comment was offensive to me. And what makes it worse is that you are a professional working in a career that you don't consider to be a profession. Which earns you a living off a hobby that you obviously don't do well enough to support your hobby that should be regarded as a career to those that want to be professionals in a profession we know and love as MASSAGE. If that is confusing to you,than you can now understand how your comment sounded to me. Goodbye, and Goodluck.

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thebodyworker in Seattle, Washington

56 months ago

Do you have more info on the person who sued the massage school and won? That is interesting.

I was also looking for people from Detroit to share their stories on how tuff it is there - contact me through my website if you are interested.

There are more insurance companies covering massage. Have you talked to Vivian Madison Mahoney - the ins. billing expert to see more about getting massage covered?

Ins. isn't the whole answer though. I can take ins. here in WA and they keep lowering their benefits each year and paying less each year although you do get clients.

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George Borg in Warren, Michigan

56 months ago

Kay in Dayton, Ohio said: Ohio was the first state to make massage therapy a limited branch medicine. Which means you can't practice as a hobby, you can't call your self a therapist, you can't knead a shoulder for pay unless you pass an exam given by the state medical board. Period. End of story. Your state just NOW pssed a law to require state licensing and is trying to figure out what YOUR scope of practice Should be.
So you see, our states are not even alike in the simple of terms. You comment was offensive to me. And what makes it worse is that you are a professional working in a career that you don't consider to be a profession. Which earns you a living off a hobby that you obviously don't do well enough to support your hobby that should be regarded as a career to those that want to be professionals in a profession we know and love as MASSAGE. If that is confusing to you,than you can now understand how your comment sounded to me. Goodbye, and Goodluck.

I copy of the requirements for Licensing in Ohio can be found at: www.massage-exam.com/ohio-massage.php
I have looked at licensing in Georgia and Florida, and found those states actually require more education than Ohio, which, yes, was the first state to have it. Other states also offer licensing by their medical departments, so your state is no better than them.
I found it offensive that you insinuate that massage therapists in Ohio are more skilled than in other states. Yes Michigan did finally pass state licensing this year, and before that each city had its own laws and rules. This also makes me feel that many states only require licensing to raise money, not set standards.
In the end, yes, massage therapists should be set to a standard and treated like the professionals they are. Unfortunately, not every part of the country is as open to massage as others.

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George Borg in Warren, Michigan

56 months ago

thebodyworker in Seattle, Washington said: Do you have more info on the person who sued the massage school and won? That is interesting.

I was also looking for people from Detroit to share their stories on how tuff it is there - contact me through my website if you are interested.

There are more insurance companies covering massage. Have you talked to Vivian Madison Mahoney - the ins. billing expert to see more about getting massage covered?

Ins. isn't the whole answer though. I can take ins. here in WA and they keep lowering their benefits each year and paying less each year although you do get clients.

It was a story I heard about a few months ago, and I looked it up on Google. It can be found at: www.madison.com/tct/news/stories/461420
She wasn't a massage student, but studied business technology. The point I was trying to make was that there are many schools that offer to train people fast and they'll be able to start a new career right away.

I'd like to hear more from other Detroiter's too. I've found that not too many like to chat with eachother, and can sometimes be very territorial.

I do agree, more insurance companies are starting to include massage, and that's great (I know some hospitals are now offering oncological and reiki massage, so that's great). I hope it continues, because when more clients are covered and not having to pay out of pocket, they have less of a problem getting a massage.

Not trying to sound like a downer, but people need to realize that sometimes its all location, location, location.

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KelticKell in New Holland, Pennsylvania

56 months ago

Hi~ I was interested in this post because I just signed up for and received financial aid for Massage Therapy School after a lot of thought about what my next career move would be. I saw how the field is growing and I always enjoyed giving massages to boyfriends and family, friends, my children, pets etc...

Since I am a single mother who had to claim Bankruptcy after my divorce, I looked for an accredited school that was conveinient and would let me use financial aid.

I am going to go to a school that offers a certificate in bodywork and prep for your license that will soon be required in PA. The school is also a Cosmetology school and for some reason I feel like I will not be taken seriously as a grad of this school. My nightmare is that I end up desperate and put an add on craig's list hat attracts wierdo's that want sexual favors or worse! Is this likely?

I am scared, I am about to dedicate a year to learning this skill. I just hope I am not getting in over my head. I love helping people, especially children and the elderly, but I am not sure if I will be able to be steadily employed. I have 2 young children and I am determined to not to the 9-5 office routine. I have had my own businesses before and handles taxes, etc. but something so "personal" could open up a whole new can of worms.

I would like to meet someone who is a massage therapist in the PA area who can tell me what to avoid and what I am in for!

Thanks for your time....

Kell
I have always been interested in things like Reiki and aromatherapy , holistic medicine, healthy eating...etc.

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George Borg in Warren, Michigan

56 months ago

Hi Kell,

My suggestion is to look into what the license requires, and what the local market is like (are people in your area receptive to massage, are there massage businesses in the area, etc). If the school also offers cosmetology, I would think of studying that also (I went to school with a woman that was already a cosmetologist, and studied massage to add to her skills).

My intent was to help others also (massage helped me to control the pain of Lyme Disease, and I wanted to share the same). It is scary to dedicate a year, especially when you have people counting on you.

I actually go onto Craigslist in the Detroit area personals, and flag the escorts several times a day, LOL. I'm sure it makes them mad, but I like to find a way of stopping them from ruining our reputation.

I didn't study Reiki, but people love it (some hospitals in the area offer it to patients). I do use aromatherapy, and clients really like to have a choice of scents.

Whatever your decision, I wish you luck. I know that you'll definitely love school though.

Take care,
George

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Melmar05 in Kissimmee, Florida

56 months ago

Those who said that students who recently graduated oftenly didn't get licensed, YOU ARE DEAD ON THE BALLS WRONG!!! I just passed my nationals yesterday & my school is 8/9 regarding pass-fail on the ncbtmb exam this year. Those who will take their exam, don't be afraid. THE EXAM IS EASY!!!

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KelticKell in New Holland, Pennsylvania

56 months ago

Hi George,

Thank you so much for your thoughtful reply. Where I live is the Amish Area of Pennsylvania...I would love to open up a shop called Intercourse Massage (Since that is the name of my town!) I think I might give off the wrong impression-but I wouls sell a heck of a lot of T-Shirts! lol.

I don't thnk that tis particular area is especially knowledgeable about holistic healing but I am close to the metro Philadelphia area (that is where I am actually from-I moved out to the country after my divorce so the kids could grow up in a house with a yard and I would be able to afford it).

At the risk of counding like a nut, I do feel that I was "led" spiritually to this type of helping nd healing work.I was in school for Physical Therapy and I enjoyed the challenging coursework, but I changed my major at the suggestion of my ex husband, to Internet Tech Management, which I was very bored with.

I would love to hear any other advice or experience you have had with your career. I am glad that you flag the prostitutes in Craig's List. I feel sorry for them. I am poor but there is no way that I would go that "low" to make money.

Thanks Again & Take Care

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George Borg in Warren, Michigan

56 months ago

KelticKell in New Holland, Pennsylvania said: Hi George,

Thank you so much for your thoughtful reply. Where I live is the Amish Area of Pennsylvania...I would love to open up a shop called Intercourse Massage (Since that is the name of my town!) I think I might give off the wrong impression-but I wouls sell a heck of a lot of T-Shirts! lol.

I don't thnk that tis particular area is especially knowledgeable about holistic healing but I am close to the metro Philadelphia area (that is where I am actually from-I moved out to the country after my divorce so the kids could grow up in a house with a yard and I would be able to afford it).

At the risk of counding like a nut, I do feel that I was "led" spiritually to this type of helping nd healing work.I was in school for Physical Therapy and I enjoyed the challenging coursework, but I changed my major at the suggestion of my ex husband, to Internet Tech Management, which I was very bored with.

I would love to hear any other advice or experience you have had with your career. I am glad that you flag the prostitutes in Craig's List. I feel sorry for them. I am poor but there is no way that I would go that "low" to make money.

Thanks Again & Take Care

good morning Kell,

LOL, just had to respond to your last message about the name you were thinking of, I think its great! Heck, you could probably make alot of money off of T-shirts alone if you offered them on the internet. I think that's the kind I'd buy just to wear casually (I'm sure friends would get a laugh out of it too).

If some people are really modest about dressing down, you might want to think of adding Shiatsu massage to your studies too. It doesn't require that the client dress down, and doesn't need a lubricant since it's mostly compression. Who knows, it might attract those that don't like going to a doctor too (not that I know much about Amish, but sounds like something that might interest them).

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Meagan Holub LMT in Seattle, Washington

56 months ago

mel3aa in Chicago, Illinois said: I am very surprised to find so much negativity about Massage Therapy on this forum. I am 2 months into a clinical massage therapy program in Chicago and I am loving it. From what I have heard (up until i came across this forum) that there are so many job opportunities, it's such a rewarding career, massage therapists love their jobs, etc. Now I am hearing completely the opposite. Maybe these people don't have the right outlook on the profession, got into it for the wrong reasons in the first place, did not go to a good school??? Anyone who has some POSITIVE stories about the Massage field I would love to hear!! Thank you!

I have a tremendous amount of positive stories about this profession. I even wrote a book for Massage Therapists hoping that they would avoid some of the mistakes I have made and obtain their personal level of success much faster.

If you are getting into the profession because you deeply care about people, and are willing to entertain the idea of working for yourself, there is an overwhelming amount of opportunity for you to be happy and fulfilled in this profession.

By no means am I saying that this profession is an easy one, but I'm not saying it has to be difficult either. You choose. Start by surrounding yourself with people who are honest, yet remain positive in their communication with you. People who "tell you like it is" and offer solutions at the same time. The two do not have to be mutually exclusive.

In fact, if you can be a realist about the possible pitfalls of this profession and decide to be successful at it no matter what it takes- you will be.

Let me know if you have any questions,
~Meagan www.hundredthousanddollarmassage.com

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Meagan Holub LMT in Seattle, Washington

56 months ago

Yes everyone just seems to want to do massage but not do the work that is needed to get it to be accepted more or to get the clients that they do need.

Great point Julie,

The reality is, if one does not want to do the work that it takes to get Massage clients, or to educate sources of large numbers of referrals, or work within niche markets that supply a high number of built in clients, one most likely will not succeed as a self employed Massage Therapist.

On top of that, if one has no interest in adding more streams of income to one's practice such as selling products lines, writing articles, or having a blog with advertisements AND has no desire or drive to to do the afforementioned, one's chances of putting food on the table are pretty slim unless working for someone else- and that will be some very lean meat, indeed.

It has been discovered by many professionals that Massage Therapists are ripe for the picking. They scoop us up by the armfuls, take most of our pay, burn us out with a too-high workload and replace us when we're used up. WE have choices to work for one of these people, or hold out for an employer who cares and is fair, or to work for ourselves.

Whichever we do, we should do it with conviction, integrity and unrelenting action. Complaining will only get one that which one fears that much faster. If something does not feel right, talk it over just long enough to get momentum to move forward. Sound about right, Julie?

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Meagan Holub LMT in Seattle, Washington

56 months ago

KelticKell in New Holland, Pennsylvania said: Hi George,

Thank you so much for your thoughtful reply. Where I live is the Amish Area of Pennsylvania...I would love to open up a shop called Intercourse Massage (Since that is the name of my town!) I think I might give off the wrong impression-but I wouls sell a heck of a lot of T-Shirts! lol.

I don't thnk that tis particular area is especially knowledgeable about holistic healing but I am close to the metro Philadelphia area (that is where I am actually from-I moved out to the country after my divorce so the kids could grow up in a house with a yard and I would be able to afford it).

Thanks Again & Take Care

Hi Keltic Kell,

I lived in a very small town in the beginning of my career that bordered an Amish community. I was quite surprised to find that one of the wives became a regular client of mine for the treatment of injuries and as a result, the rest of the group too. My experience is that you need to be very firm with your boundaries or you may end up with a flat of canned peaches or some chickens as payment. Seriously. Been there. Done that.

After reading your comments I feel that you have what it takes to be a successful Massage Therapist. You are compassionate, a healer, marketing savvy and inquisitive. I don't know what your area's demographic is, but I do know that you could start a side business at first- so as not to put yourself or children in financial risk, and you could grow to a large business if the need is there. definitely push the t-shirt thing. Very funny. I wan t to see one of the Amish wearing them!

www.hundredthousanddollarmassage.com

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Meagan Holub LMT in Seattle, Washington

56 months ago

Sharon in Portland, Oregon said: Don't be frustrated by the posts, George. It's REALLY not helpful and REALLY discouraging to many LMTs who live in severely depressed areas like yours. No one has money for massage, school, or education. I just moved out of one of those areas and know how much different it is up here in Portland. I've been to Seattle and it's an even easier market than Portland. It wasn't my beliefs after all despite what someone around here keeps chanting!

Sometimes the thing to do is move like I did. Sometimes you have to find something else to do that DOES pay the bills. You can still massage on the side.

Anyway, I felt you needed some hugs and support from a fellow realist! You got it!

I agree with you Sharon. If all routes to a Massage practice that can fulfill a family's financial needs are exhausted, and that person still wants to be a practicing Massage Therapist, if the family is willing- relocate!

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George Borg in Warren, Michigan

56 months ago

Meagan Holub LMT in Seattle, Washington said: I agree with you Sharon. If all routes to a Massage practice that can fulfill a family's financial needs are exhausted, and that person still wants to be a practicing Massage Therapist, if the family is willing- relocate!

I agree. I've been sticking around to help my parents, but its gotten ti the point that I'm now applying to work on cruise ships. I do like massage therapy, but frankly getting any work here is like trying to squeeze blood from a turnip.

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Meagan Holub LMT in Seattle, Washington

56 months ago

Cav in Addison Township, Michigan said: Meagan,

I'm glad that the last comment I read was yours. I am looking into getting into this field as a career change. I'm 33 with 2 kids and my current job requires so much travel that I've seen my kids 5 times since January. I am passionate about nutrition, exercise, and overall wellbeing and I feel like massage therapy is a field that would encourage this passion that I have. I'm SO excited about it but reading a lot of these comments brought me down a bit. I'm glad to see your comment is positive.

I've always been an independent contractor so not having benefits really doesn't bother me.

I found a school that follows the pre-requisites for the national certification exam. It is an accelerated 16 week program. It is 3 nights a week, 5 1/2 hours each night. The cost is almost $10,000. Does this sound average to you guys?

Thanks!!

- Cav

Cav,

You sound like a good fit for achieving success in this profession. You already understand the pitfalls of being self-employed. (However I do recommend you getting health care for your family as soon as possible, of course). I'm sorry that I didn't see this until now. I've been away from indeed.com for a couple of months. Let me know what you have decided. (I agree with everyone else here- the education you were looking at was WAy too expensive). If you have any questions contact me through my bog. You can find it on my website. www.hundredthosuanddollarmassage.com

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Meagan Holub LMT in Seattle, Washington

56 months ago

George Borg in Warren, Michigan said: I agree. I've been sticking around to help my parents, but its gotten ti the point that I'm now applying to work on cruise ships. I do like massage therapy, but frankly getting any work here is like trying to squeeze blood from a turnip.

Can you help your parents from a distance? How are you helping them? I do understand your dilemma I have stayed in the NW for many years to be close to, and help my family. Can I offer any support?

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George Borg in Warren, Michigan

56 months ago

Meagan Holub LMT in Seattle, Washington said: Can you help your parents from a distance? How are you helping them? I do understand your dilemma I have stayed in the NW for many years to be close to, and help my family. Can I offer any support?

Alot of the help I offer has been helping around the house, driving them to appointments and errands, and setting up medical appointments. At this point, I figure that it's time for my other siblings in the area to get involved so I can get on with life. Thank God I'm single with no kids.

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Meagan Holub LMT in Seattle, Washington

56 months ago

George Borg in Warren, Michigan said: Alot of the help I offer has been helping around the house, driving them to appointments and errands, and setting up medical appointments. At this point, I figure that it's time for my other siblings in the area to get involved so I can get on with life. Thank God I'm single with no kids.

Good for you George. I back you up on that one. In fact, I recently made the same decision myself. Go live your life, it's what you're here for!

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George Borg in Warren, Michigan

56 months ago

Meagan Holub LMT in Seattle, Washington said: Good for you George. I back you up on that one. In fact, I recently made the same decision myself. Go live your life, it's what you're here for!

Thanks. I felt responsible because they took care of me while dealing with Lyme Disease, but now its time for the others to pitch in.

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Meagan Holub LMT in Seattle, Washington

56 months ago

Sabeena in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma said: Yes, massage is a real job for others. It doesn't suit my self-image, I don't like it or want to do it, so it doesn't feel like a real job for me.

Here's my message to the massage community: It doesn't really matter what your "subconscious beliefs" are. I know being a MT violates my "subconscious beliefs" because I feel bad doing it.

Don't waste your time figuring out your subconscious beliefs or what you want to do. JUST DO IT. Your subconscious beliefs will be revealed to you during the process, so you can make adjustments as you go along. My "secrets" can all be found in the Guerilla Marketing series: gmarketing.com. It's perfect for anyone, whether you want to be an employee, independent contractor or spa owner.

And no, I won't teach or write about it. It's perfect and waiting for whoever wants it. I would be an arrogant a$$ to presume I have any more to bring to the table than already exists.

Hi Sabeena,

If you don't want to write about it... that's cool, but after reading a lot of your threads on indeed.com, for what it's worth (a grain of salt) I think you have much to say and that a blog would be a really great forum for you. As you know, few people have anything "new" to say, but each of us has a unique way of saying things that affects different people, well... differently. You seem to genuinely want to help Massage Therapists. You're smart, obviously love to write, and bring fresh, thoughtful perspectives to the table... I bet you'd be the perfect person to build a very successful blog. You could help move this profession forward into the world of respected professionalism, by being YOU in a public forum.

Cheers!
~Meagan

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Sabeena in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

56 months ago

Meagan Holub LMT in Seattle, Washington said: Hi Sabeena,

If you don't want to write about it... that's cool, but after reading a lot of your threads on indeed.com, for what it's worth (a grain of salt) I think you have much to say and that a blog would be a really great forum for you. As you know, few people have anything "new" to say, but each of us has a unique way of saying things that affects different people, well... differently. You seem to genuinely want to help Massage Therapists. You're smart, obviously love to write, and bring fresh, thoughtful perspectives to the table... I bet you'd be the perfect person to build a very successful blog. You could help move this profession forward into the world of respected professionalism, by being YOU in a public forum.

Cheers!
~Meagan

Wow, Meagan, for the first time I don't exactly know what to say (blushing). Except I never thought about it, but you're right. On the one hand I say I don't want to write about it, but my actions defy that statement. I never seem to be at a loss for an opinion, do I?

Hmmmm...You've given me something to think about. I actually do have a book written on the ABCs of Client Centered Communications but haven't pursued publishing it. Don't quite know why...

On another thread you stated you learn a lot when you write. Would you mind sharing something you've learned with your first book?

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DarwinH in Chester, United Kingdom

56 months ago

Hi,

The cruise ship spas have gotten quite creative. They now offer massages at affordable rates. Then there are four hand massages where two people work on you at the same time. Some of the cruise lines offer in suite massages and some even have massages on the deck.

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Meagan Holub LMT in Seattle, Washington

56 months ago

Sabeena in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma said: Wow, Meagan, for the first time I don't exactly know what to say (blushing). Except I never thought about it, but you're right. On the one hand I say I don't want to write about it, but my actions defy that statement. I never seem to be at a loss for an opinion, do I?

Hmmmm...You've given me something to think about. I actually do have a book written on the ABCs of Client Centered Communications but haven't pursued publishing it. Don't quite know why...

On another thread you stated you learn a lot when you write. Would you mind sharing something you've learned with your first book?

Oh my goodness, Sabeena, I am STILL learning. The entire process seems to begin once the book is written and you venture into the publication and marketing and hiring of freelancers... oh my! I am learnign how to be technical minded in way that I have never needed to be before, how to balance multiple types of businesses, how to outsource help, and how to do something that not many people yet know how to do... successfully write, publish and market a self-published book. All the while I'm working with a title that, while in the "real world" is vanilla, it is a very bitter pill for many Massage Therapists to swallow. However, I ultimately feel in my heart that my messages purpose is pure and that my little book will help lead us into a more professional way of being.

I can't believe that you have already written a book! That is fantastic. You are like 90% of the way to being a published author. Forgive me for boasting here a little... but... I KNEW it! I recommend you check out lightningsource.com for self publishing needs. It's print on demand, so it's a great beginners printing press. You can get the book in print for very little start up cost. It sounds as though your book hits a niche market demographic so you could actually start making some extra money off of this little baby of yours.

Good luck!

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