Changing Jobs To Massage Therapist. Is 35 too old.

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bobbid in winona, Minnesota

41 months ago

I am changing professions, from a nurse to massage therapist. Is 35 years old too old to start?

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LuckyK in Cerritos, California

41 months ago

I hope not! At 37 I am changing from fashion retail sales to a pharmacy technician.

In this economy you have to do what you have to do.

But weren't you making more money as a nurse? Do you think you will be happier as a message therapist?

I just visited a family friend in a rural area who is a massage therapist and can't find a job. So I guess it depends on where you live as to how successful you will be.

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bobbid in Rochester, Minnesota

41 months ago

LuckyK in Cerritos, California said: I hope not! At 37 I am changing from fashion retail sales to a pharmacy technician.

In this economy you have to do what you have to do.

But weren't you making more money as a nurse? Do you think you will be happier as a message therapist?

I just visited a family friend in a rural area who is a massage therapist and can't find a job. So I guess it depends on where you live as to how successful you will be.

I was making more money but I would rather be happier. I know I will not be rich by being a massage therapist. I am happy just living comfortably. I also read it is a growing occupation. Nursing is an emotional burnout after the amount of years I spent doing it. I think being a massage therapist, while I will make less, will make me feel less stressed by far. I know massage is physically demanding but I have heard from more than person (other massage therapists, mine included) that the emotional toll is less. I am sure every job is stressful emotionally. Before nursing I was a nursing assistant and that was very physically demanding and I handled it well. On my feet 8 hours a day, sometimes not getting breaks or lunch. I am pretty strong with my upper body strength. I will be going for the associates in massage so if or when my arms and hands poop out I can maybe manage a massage business or something of the like. But I am glad to hear there is someone else out there changing careers in their 30's. Seems quite a bit of society has made some women feel over the hill beyond 30, that is why I asked the question.

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foreversearching in Chandler, Arizona

41 months ago

Just a suggestion but you may want to explore other career options as well. There is nothing wrong with changing fields in your thirties, or at any age for that matter, but it is important to be realistic about things. Not only will you take a huge pay cut but you most likely won't be able to support yourself on an intro massage salary (if you can even find steady work). You won't have medical benefits either. Unless you have someone else paying your way, I would re-think. I know many therapists who have been working for years and still can't make ends meet. Plus, this job is VERY hard on your body.

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Wil

41 months ago

At 37 I began Carslon College of Massage Therapy & am now waiting on my license from Texas. Some of the instructors had been full time therapists for 18 years working 20-30 hours a week. So if you take care of yourself you're not likely to physically burn out as fast as some of the people on these forums say. I'm not just basing this on the instructors, I have an ex-girlfriend who has been in practice for herself for 8 years now & was working at a spa several years prior to that. It seems though, that in order to make any money & avoid "happy ending requests" you either have to work for a chiropractor or be your own boss (which gives you the ability to toss these clients out) Good luck!

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Ankur in North Brunswick, New Jersey

38 months ago

I am 37 and have been massaging full time for 2 years now. I graduated from school in 2009 and currently have my own private practice 15-20hrs a week. It all depends on how you take care of yourself with regular massages, exercise, and the like. Yoga has also helped me quite a bit with stretching, stances, breathwork, and being able to really "hear" what my body needs.

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kay in Frisco, Texas

38 months ago

bobbid in winona, Minnesota said: I am changing professions, from a nurse to massage therapist. Is 35 years old too old to start?

Hi I'm normally a very optimistic person I've been a therapist for 8 yrs you will regret it first year. It's to taxing on your body. You will make very little because everyone else is trying to make money from the overworked massage therapist.Even in washington where are contracted with insurance. One therapist wrote I wake up in hell every morning well I dont sleep well at night because of overworked contracted muscles. -

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wellnessniagara in Fonthill, Ontario

38 months ago

I know several other RMT's and DC's that have taken a proactive approach to their careers by supplementing their income through other means (a secondary source of revenue within their DC or RMT business). It's allowed them to prepare an exit strategy as we all know how taxing MT can be on your body. Some of them have already walked away from their practices and others are poised to do so in the next few years. The average career of a RMT is only 8 years!

I've done the same and am very happy for it... We started using a health and wellness product line and have gone on to share its benefits with all our clients. The response is incredible and client loyalty is fantastic. The nice thing is that it's allowed my wife and I to form our exit strategy while still providing us the satisfaction of helping people with their health.

Please let me know if you would like to know what we're doing as I really feel that regardless of your choice, it's something that will provide you with the satisfaction and quality of life you're seeking.

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Rob240 in Dublin, California

38 months ago

I'm 60 and took early retirement after a very strenuous job working as a government contractor. I took off a year or so to decompress (my wife has a good job) and I'm thinking of taking classes for massage therapy, but I'm interested in accupressure and healing touch. Probably not as strenuous as Swedish or deep tissue/sports massage.

I'm in very good shape and only want to work part-time. Do you think I'm going to regret this?

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Rob240 in Dublin, California

38 months ago

bobbid in winona, Minnesota said: I am changing professions, from a nurse to massage therapist. Is 35 years old too old to start?

Well, I'm 60 and plan on doing this part-time during retirement. Tried golf and what not for a year and hated it. I plan to specialize in accupressure - not as strenuous as deep tissue/sports massage or Swedish.

I know they offer courses for therapists on how to take care of yourself.

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jerry , the RMT of Ontario, Canada in Toronto, Ontario

38 months ago

Rob240 in Dublin, California said: I'm 60 and took early retirement after a very strenuous job working as a government contractor. I took off a year or so to decompress (my wife has a good job) and I'm thinking of taking classes for massage therapy, but I'm interested in accupressure and healing touch. Probably not as strenuous as Swedish or deep tissue/sports massage.

I'm in very good shape and only want to work part-time. Do you think I'm going to regret this?

No. If you are interested in helping other people and you enjoy learning the health science, there would be no regret studying massage.
I am over 50 and I am not in a very good physical conditions and I just successfully passed the Board Exam. I learned so much that I volunteered helping many, known or strangers with my knowledge and skills. My life is totally different and the feeling of happiness is way over weight the passed 2yr hell like tough study - day and night. No pain, no gain.
The worst case is you fail, and you still learned some of the health science knowledge and massage skills which will be valuable to your partner and yourself.
So, Why not give a shot?

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Joan Ballantye in Novi, Michigan

38 months ago

bobbid in winona, Minnesota said: I am changing professions, from a nurse to massage therapist. Is 35 years old too old to start?

Absolutely not I started at 44! Just don't overdue watch body mechanics get your own bodywork so you know what is out there etc. Good Luck.

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Ally - RMT in Ontario in King City, Ontario

38 months ago

I have always been a positive person but I need to tell you something you may not want to hear. I am just being honest and speaking from my heart. I have been an RMT for eight years and can honestly say, I now feel a lot of physical reprocutions from being an RMT. I take care of myself. I am pretty fit. I am also healthy, but unfortunately I now experience numbness and stiffness in my back, neck, arms and hands. I experience very swollen legs as well from standing so many hours a day for many years. Being a Massage Therapist is a really hard on the body! It is also tough to be self employed and make a good paycheque. I highly suggest you consider another career. As much as I love healing and helping people in need, I don't think Massage Therapy is recognized or valued yet by many people. If you don't want to struggle financially, stress over slow seasons because you are not making enought money to live and not feel any long term effects such as pain, numbness and stiffness on your body, then do not become a Massage Therapist. I get no benefits, vacation pay or paid sick days. There are more disadvantages than advantages for being an Massage Therapist. Best advice, choose another profession. All the best!

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wellnessniagara in Fonthill, Ontario

37 months ago

I don't think you need to be as drastic as choosing something else but, make sure you have a plan B. There's a reason why the average RMT career is only 8 yrs and it's not because of boredom. My plan B is soon to become my Plan A in 1.5 yrs and I'll still love what I do because I'll be helping people with their health. Fits very well into the RMT office. If you love RMT, then go for it... just have second plan.

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jerry nie , the RMT serve ordinary peopl in Toronto, Ontario

37 months ago

Responding to the original question"to be MT or not": why not try a few sections of massage introduction course and then considering your financial, physical, and emotional,your family, your neighbour,your pets, etc. and lot of other factors and then, and only after that, make your decision.
Remember: there is impossible to fulfil you desire regarding wherever you want; but always thousands of what you don't want waiting for you. This is the life.
Everything comes with the advert effect, or the cost: your time, your physical condition, your future, .... if everything is around you, by yourself, nothing can satisfy you - because you think you are the centre of everything.
If you love to offer what you have to others, you will be happy most of the time and all other things are not important.
The key is do you love to do massage to clients?
If you believe you have nothing to give, or always afraid not being reward enough, stay home is the best choice among many other choices, or you will regret all your life for what you feel being pushed to do.
Do you love to do this or not?
To be or not to be? is not a simple question.

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asia lim in Montreal, Quebec

30 months ago

I think you can change any career you want. I keep changing jobs when i was in 20s But i went back to school at 32 years old for nursing course but it is too stressful for me so i stop after a year. I studied to be a massage therapist. I like it so much but sometimes i get tired too if i dont take care of myself. So i decided to study esthetics. I just got my diploma last month. I am so excited to put up my business and i work in the gym right now. But still struggling with marketing and business skills. I keep reading books or internet to give me more ideas. And i dont stop learning. I have a lot of service to offer but i just dont know how to spread it in the world :). And the french language here too is the problem to keeping me to talk to people. But i have a good customer service skills, but it is hardwork. I still plan to take courses like electrolysis and finish my nursing course even i am 36 years old now.
My mother in law is a massage therapist too. And she is doing it as self employed. She's been working for 6 years. And at the age of over 55, she still doing a good job. I hope this help. ;)

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Edie in Charlotte, North Carolina

29 months ago

I changed professions at 34. You are never too old to try something new. Sure, you may want to study something else in the future, but if you take care of yourself (VERY important- you can't just expect your body to bounce back like it did in your 20's), you can do it. Yoga has helped me a lot with awareness with my body, and I do cardio to increase my stamina. I cannot emphasize enough how important this is- take care of yourself. All the way to those forearms- you NEED to ice and stretch your forearms and hands- don't skip it because you don't like ice.

With massage, comes the responsibility to take care of yourself so you can work. Eat right. Exercise. Breathe. And most importantly- take time off to recover when you need it.

Good luck!!! :D

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SHERRY in Las Vegas, Nevada

12 months ago

bobbid in winona, Minnesota said: I am changing professions, from a nurse to massage therapist. Is 35 years old too old to start?

I BECAME A MASSAGE THERAPIST WHEN I WAS AROUND 48. I ONLY STOPPED A COUPLE OF YEARS AGO TO CARE GIVE FOR MY ELDERLY MOTHER, BUT I WAS MAKING VERY GOOD MONEY WITH MY OWN BUSINESS. WHAT I AM WONDERING AS I AM 66 CAN I GO BACK TO WORK? I STILL FEEL VERY HEALTHY AND ONCE IN A WHILE I DO MASSAGE AND MY CLIENTS STILL LOVE MY WORK. SO I WOULD SAY AT 35 YOU STILL HAVE A LONG CAREER AHEAD OF YOU. I MADE OVER $1,000 A WEEK. MY SISTER IS NOW AROUND 57 AND HER BUSINESS IS STILL GOING STRONG.
I JUST WISH I KNEW IF IT WILL BE WORTH MY WHILE TO STUDY FOR THAT NATIONAL AND GO THROUGH THE EXPENSE OF GETTING LICENSED. I SUPPOSE THERE IS ALWAYS CHAIR MASSAGE AND GERIATRIC MASSAGE WHICH IS EASY ON THE BODY.

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kj in Bloomington, Indiana

11 months ago

bobbid in winona, Minnesota said: I am changing professions, from a nurse to massage therapist. Is 35 years old too old to start?

-Some people love doing massage therapy and others do not. Be ready to be in pain all of the time. You have to be VERY healthy, stretch everyday, take very good care of yourself to be able to do this profession. I love it when I'm not in pain but it always makes my body hurt. It can be good money for the amount of time but for the amount of pain it can put on your body it is not worth the money. It is very inconsistent at times. Up and down. To make it work for you, you have to not give people a very deep massage. I cant really NOT give people what they want so I get Very burnt out. Like i said- some people love it and some people dont. I feel like the big black guy from green mile. I suck in everyones bad energy. It is very hard. I make around 18-20 k and its just too tiring for that little of money. I am also only 23 and I should not be in this much pain. I have had to quit working at times because my body is so beat up. I wouldnt recommend it - but some people like it. you can make good money with your own clients - although it can be difficult starting out. If you work for other people- BE Careful- I know lots of therapist that get taken advantage of. It way too hard of work to only get $20 per massage- if your doing 6 massages a day( which is going to KILL your body) your only making $120 that is bad pay. DO NOT RUIN your body for that little pay. You need to get at least $30 an hour plus tips. At $30 an hour plus tips you can make a decent living but i dont know how you could support a family on that - plus your going to be VERY tired. I know a lot of nurses and my mother is one and she says nursing is tiring but I really doubt it could be as tiring as working 4-6 hours of massage therapy. Its tough work. It can be fun though. I like it sometimes. and if you can deal with pain. try it.

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kj in Bloomington, Indiana

11 months ago

Ally - RMT in Ontario in King City, Ontario said: I have always been a positive person but I need to tell you something you may not want to hear. I am just being honest and speaking from my heart. I have been an RMT for eight years and can honestly say, I now feel a lot of physical reprocutions from being an RMT. I take care of myself. I am pretty fit. I am also healthy, but unfortunately I now experience numbness and stiffness in my back, neck, arms and hands. I experience very swollen legs as well from standing so many hours a day for many years. Being a Massage Therapist is a really hard on the body! It is also tough to be self employed and make a good paycheque. I highly suggest you consider another career. As much as I love healing and helping people in need, I don't think Massage Therapy is recognized or valued yet by many people. If you don't want to struggle financially, stress over slow seasons because you are not making enought money to live and not feel any long term effects such as pain, numbness and stiffness on your body, then do not become a Massage Therapist. I get no benefits, vacation pay or paid sick days. There are more disadvantages than advantages for being an Massage Therapist. Best advice, choose another profession. All the best!

Ally-I totally agree with you sister! I like it ! But My body hurts SOO bad allll the time. whatever money I am making that is good- $100 or so in 2 hours thats nice- But what it does to my body is not worth any of that money. I am studying to be an OTA now and I cannot wait to not be bent over someone body taking their stress away. It is not enough money to live and you are going to be SOO sore ALL of the time. I have been a VERY happy and Positive person my whole life until working as a MASSAGe Therapist. -- Its up and down with the pay- NOt steady at all- THis Christmas -after thanksgiving i only made $170 on my paycheck in two weeks. Yes that was only 4 massages but YOU CANNOT live on that!

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kj in Bloomington, Indiana

11 months ago

SHERRY in Las Vegas, Nevada said: I BECAME A MASSAGE THERAPIST WHEN I WAS AROUND 48. I ONLY STOPPED A COUPLE OF YEARS AGO TO CARE GIVE FOR MY ELDERLY MOTHER, BUT I WAS MAKING VERY GOOD MONEY WITH MY OWN BUSINESS . WHAT I AM WONDERING AS I AM 66 CAN I GO BACK TO WORK? I STILL FEEL VERY HEALTHY AND ONCE IN A WHILE I DO MASSAGE AND MY CLIENTS STILL LOVE MY WORK. SO I WOULD SAY AT 35 YOU STILL HAVE A LONG CAREER AHEAD OF YOU. I MADE OVER $1,000 A WEEK. MY SISTER IS NOW AROUND 57 AND HER BUSINESS IS STILL GOING STRONG.
I JUST WISH I KNEW IF IT WILL BE WORTH MY WHILE TO STUDY FOR THAT NATIONAL AND GO THROUGH THE EXPENSE OF GETTING LICENSED. I SUPPOSE THERE IS ALWAYS CHAIR MASSAGE AND GERIATRIC MASSAGE WHICH IS EASY ON THE BODY.

NOt to mention all the HAPPY Ending bs. depressing and annoying and degrading to our profession. Im not saying that your aunt does that, but some of the therapist that make high dollars definitely do it. I know at least one of my peers in school admitted to me later after school that she does that in her private practice and im sure she makes a good salary. anyways. to each their own. It can be healing for someone and it can also be a perverted addiction. Good luck- DOnt choose Massage therapy.

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kj in Bloomington, Indiana

11 months ago

Sherry- Im not tryin to attack you- BUT you are from LAS Vegas so it was something I wanted to mention to potential people looking into this career as a POTENTIAL reality. please to do not think That i am tryin to personally attack you- Because that is not my intention- I just want people to know what is out there.

meant to say not sure if your sister does that* or you - SORRY if i sound rude- if just had some run ins and want people to consider that when choosing this career because I had no idea about that when i got into school and now I learned the tough cruel world of massage therapy

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kj in Bloomington, Indiana

11 months ago

kay in Frisco, Texas said: Hi I'm normally a very optimistic person I've been a therapist for 8 yrs you will regret it first year. It's to taxing on your body. You will make very little because everyone else is trying to make money from the overworked massage therapist.Even in washington where are contracted with insurance . One therapist wrote I wake up in hell every morning well I dont sleep well at night because of overworked contracted muscles. -

completely agree and I tell anyone thinking of doing it NOT to get into massage therapy. Its has put me in pain and have gotten addicted to pain meds because its so painful. Really be careful people.

The jobs you will get most of the time - force you to do Deep tissue. My current job has me doing almost all Deep Tissue because I'm new and Its awful. PLease save yourself the headache, backache, and depression

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Massage Therapy Schools Information in Irving, Texas

10 months ago

Absolutely not too late. In fact many choose massage therapy as a second career or as a part time career to supplement their income because it's a break away from the day to day rut. The money is also good. Because you are doing it part time, it is also not too stressful. It is true that some have negative experiences, such as KJ in Indiana. You just have to be careful, learn the ways you can make the job enjoyable and less strenuous. From personal experience I can tell you this is possible and it leads to a very fulfilling career. All the best to you

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britney in Chino, California

8 months ago

bobbid in Rochester, Minnesota said: I was making more money but I would rather be happier. I know I will not be rich by being a massage therapist. I am happy just living comfortably. I also read it is a growing occupation. Nursing is an emotional burnout after the amount of years I spent doing it. I think being a massage therapist, while I will make less, will make me feel less stressed by far. I know massage is physically demanding but I have heard from more than person (other massage therapists, mine included) that the emotional toll is less. I am sure every job is stressful emotionally. Before nursing I was a nursing assistant and that was very physically demanding and I handled it well. On my feet 8 hours a day, sometimes not getting breaks or lunch. I am pretty strong with my upper body strength. I will be going for the associates in massage so if or when my arms and hands poop out I can maybe manage a massage business or something of the like. But I am glad to hear there is someone else out there changing careers in their 30's. Seems quite a bit of society has made some women feel over the hill beyond 30, that is why I asked the question.

We are in the age, when people decide if to continue on their life path or change. I am 40, and will be graduating on october 2014 as an MT. You have a background as a nurse and it will definetely help you, when doing the assessment of the client, contraindications, any emergency etc. It will open the doors too to work at a chiropractor's office, acupuncturist etc. About the physical demands... you've been there ! Nursing requires a lot of physical effort and I dont think massage will require more than nursing. It is a growing field,the important thing is to go out there in your community, you dont have to work for someone else. You can be your own boss, decide the days and hours you can work and yes choose your clients too. It has a lot of room for growth! wishing you success!

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delmonte in Newmarket, Ontario

7 months ago

bobbid in Rochester, Minnesota said: I was making more money but I would rather be happier. I know I will not be rich by being a massage therapist. I am happy just living comfortably. I also read it is a growing occupation. Nursing is an emotional burnout after the amount of years I spent doing it. I think being a massage therapist, while I will make less, will make me feel less stressed by far. I know massage is physically demanding but I have heard from more than person (other massage therapists, mine included) that the emotional toll is less. I am sure every job is stressful emotionally. Before nursing I was a nursing assistant and that was very physically demanding and I handled it well. On my feet 8 hours a day, sometimes not getting breaks or lunch. I am pretty strong with my upper body strength. I will be going for the associates in massage so if or when my arms and hands poop out I can maybe manage a massage business or something of the like. But I am glad to hear there is someone else out there changing careers in their 30's. Seems quite a bit of society has made some women feel over the hill beyond 30, that is why I asked the question.

Your are not too old. I am 45,RN and planning to change career for the same reason.....and u are right,better to have a lower salary but working happy unlike working with high salary(RN) but unhappy and miserable coz of too stressfull work that caused us burn out and severe depression.....Good luck.

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