AHIMA's Exams - No Educational Requirements!

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Joni Joyner in Tulsa, Oklahoma

72 months ago

Contact tcarter@kforce.com. She hires traveling coders and transcriptionists, and you can tell her Joni Joyner referred you. She is a great person to work for. They pay weekly and are GREAT

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Annie in Millington, Michigan

72 months ago

Jeannine in Missouri City, Texas said: I would like to know when will the next AHIMA exam be given? I live in Houston, Tx and completed the necessary classes for this exam 2 years ago. However, I was hired and began working in an Oncologist office before I completed the exam. What I would like to know from some one with a situation similar to mine and has completed the exam. What should I focus on in refreshing my skills?

You have to go on the AHIMA site, look under certifications and that will direct you to Prometric which is an exam testing center with sites nationwide. I was able to pick pretty much whatever date I wanted.

As far as skills, I would focus on JCAHO regulations, statistical calculations (mortality/autopsy rate, discharge rate, etc), payment systems (APCs, DRGs, etc), privacy regulations (who can you release to and what do you need to do so), types of record retention systems (EHRs and types of networks) and coding. The coding is very specific and focuses on coding sequences rather than looking up codes. In fact, you don't use any books--they give you a segment of the ICD-9 manual right in the questions. But because you don't have the manual you really have to know your guidelines.

Good Luck!

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Deepa in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

72 months ago

Hi Lorraine,
Am following your posts closely. Am a CPC-H coder with five years of coding experience. I would like to get AHIMA certification. Please suggest me which one would be more appropriate for me.
If CCS, then what are the study materials shd i follow?
Thanks
Deepa

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Jennifer in Dayton, Ohio

71 months ago

I just took the CPC and passed, and after two years of school I found it extremely easy. But I am afraid of the CCS exam! We did the prep books in my coding internship and they were so hard.

Did you just take the AAPC CPC exam? I am 2 years out of my medical coding classes and now only code in an EMS setting (very easy/vague codes we use). Do you think if I studied hard to relearn the coding that I could pass it? They also say there are different exams or sections within the exams. Can you tell me what they mean by this? Is there a health statistics section and an Anatomy section, etc in addition to the coding or what?

Confused in Ohio

Jennifer

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Jennifer in Dayton, Ohio

71 months ago

Tami in CA said: I'm an RN who retired 21 years ago to raise my family. I have an AA degree but stupidly let my nursing license lapse because I was financially secure and had no desire to return to nursing. Yeah, I know.

Now that I find myself in a position where I must return to work ASAP, I'm considering medical coding. I'm wading though all the information and wondering if it would a good transition considering my background and if an approved online course would be the ticket for me. I'm hoping my nursing history would would help speed up the process. I'm a a quick study, fast keyboarder and ready to get cracking.
Comments or suggestions?

If you can retain #'s easily (memorize them and know their meaning) 829.0 = fracture (very unspecific code) but just to give you an idea. If you have to constantly check your books on every code, it may not be the way to go......but your nursing background should help you alot, yes for the A&P knowledge, reading doctor's handwriting..... etc

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Joni Joyner in Tulsa, Oklahoma

71 months ago

I am studying for my CMT prep course this month to take test in March. I have been a transcriptionist for 22 years, any tips, can I do this? I mostly have experience in ER and clinic. And owned my own business, finding it more important to land a job with RMT or CMT credentials. Any thoughts?

Joni Joyner

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rose of sharon in Smyrna, Georgia

71 months ago

Vanessa in Bronx, New York said: I have heard though of someone who didn't go to any coding school and bought the books and taught herself. So I guess it could happen. Dedication is the key.

my co worker got her ccs certifaction that way studing on her own so it can be done

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CODERANALYST2005 in Garland, Texas

71 months ago

Monica in Clarksville, Tennessee said: I'm also interested in the AHIMA distance education course. I just want to make sure that their program is respected in the medical community. I don't want to spend $2,000 to find out that I can't get a medical coding job with an AHIMA certificate. I was just a little concerned because they aren't considered a school but are an association. Does that make a big difference?

GETTING ANYTHING THROUGH AHIMA IS THE BEST DECISION YOU COULD MAKE FOR YOUR SELF AND FUTURE, AHIMA IS THE ONLY RECOGNIZED CERTIFICATION IN THE "REAL WORLD"( OF CODING ) I KNOW THAT IT SOUNDS SHALLOW BUT I GET RESUMES ALL THE TIME AND I WOULD HIRE A NO EXPERIENCE CCS AND TRAIN FROM BOTTOM UP RATHER THAN A 3 YEAR EXPERIENCE CPC, THE STANDARDS ARE MUCH HIGHER AND THE PAY IS ABOUT A 15-20,000 A YEAR DIFFERENCE I AUDIT FOR THE CENTER OF MEDICAID AND MEDICARE SERVICES CMS YOUR SOON TO BE BEST FRIEND!

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vanessa in Bronx, New York

71 months ago

CODERANALYST2005 in Garland, Texas said: GETTING ANYTHING THROUGH AHIMA IS THE BEST DECISION YOU COULD MAKE FOR YOUR SELF AND FUTURE, AHIMA IS THE ONLY RECOGNIZED CERTIFICATION IN THE "REAL WORLD"( OF CODING ) I KNOW THAT IT SOUNDS SHALLOW BUT I GET RESUMES ALL THE TIME AND I WOULD HIRE A NO EXPERIENCE CCS AND TRAIN FROM BOTTOM UP RATHER THAN A 3 YEAR EXPERIENCE CPC, THE STANDARDS ARE MUCH HIGHER AND THE PAY IS ABOUT A 15-20,000 A YEAR DIFFERENCE I AUDIT FOR THE CENTER OF MEDICAID AND MEDICARE SERVICES CMS YOUR SOON TO BE BEST FRIEND!

Don't discredit AAPC because you are certified by AHIMA, and take students from that organization only. And yes more facilites tend to take AHIMA credential but AAPC is an organization that train students for out-patient coding.

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CODERANALYST2005 in Garland, Texas

71 months ago

When you have been coding ten years( I'm 30) and you tend to see the same situation everyday, from Dept. Heads and and on a corporate level,and you plan this is going to be your career and want to move ahead into, audit findings, E/M consulting and Consulting travel, the AHIMA cert is a certain thing, It is not a discredit to anyone trying to better themselves, but why reach for some and not all... outpatient coding is where I started and will be most grateful for all my mentors coaching, but as a well rounded coder you must code Multi-specialty this is where the need is and will always be. Inpatient, OP-notes, APC classifications and DRG's are pertinent. NO insult to AAPC credentials just a real world fact.

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rose of sharon in Smyrna, Georgia

71 months ago

yes you are correct my director only look at resume or interview anyone with a AHIM CCS certifaction.

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Teresa in Fayetteville, North Carolina

71 months ago

I am going through the Health Information Management Program to get my RHIA and I am wondering does anyone know anyone who is willing to hire a non certfied person with one yr experience with coding in Georgia or to be a traveling coder. I will be graduated in Dec. Thank you

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rose of sharon in Smyrna, Georgia

71 months ago

i will get some info but it by monday

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Joni Joyner in Tulsa, Oklahoma

71 months ago

I like Teresa Carter, KFORCE, in Tampa Florida. Tell her Joni Joyner referred you. tcarter@kforce.com. She might can help.

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coderanalyst in Garland, Texas

71 months ago

Teresa in Fayetteville, North Carolina said: I am going through the Health Information Management Program to get my RHIA and I am wondering does anyone know anyone who is willing to hire a non certfied person with one yr experience with coding in Georgia or to be a traveling coder. I will be graduated in Dec. Thank you

As a traveling coder companies have to be able to be sure that you can work independent and make decisions that reflect many reimbursemnt elements,issues depending on the type of facility they may send you to. Certification is an absolute requirement. Hope this helps, you may also visit maximhealthcare.com and get more info on contract assignments, and requirements.

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abp41 in Baden, Pennsylvania

71 months ago

Hello,
It does not matter how fast you can type. Coding has to do with placing numbers (disease oodes) in place of the name of the disease, procedure, etc. You may use software to choose these codes or you may use books depending on what the employer wants. It can be a lucrative profession but it seems to be difficult to get your foot in the door as all the jobs I see want at least 1 yr of experience. I believe it is who you know and not as much what you know. A good place to start is by working perhaps in an office or healthcare facility where coders are employed. Show a strong interest in wanting to code in the future. After 3 or more years of experience, you can go on to audit other coders and travel around. This job brings great pay. Good Luck!

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Annie in Millington, Michigan

71 months ago

abp41 in Baden, Pennsylvania said: Hello,
It does not matter how fast you can type. Coding has to do with placing numbers (disease oodes) in place of the name of the disease, procedure, etc. You may use software to choose these codes or you may use books depending on what the employer wants. It can be a lucrative profession but it seems to be difficult to get your foot in the door as all the jobs I see want at least 1 yr of experience. I believe it is who you know and not as much what you know. A good place to start is by working perhaps in an office or healthcare facility where coders are employed. Show a strong interest in wanting to code in the future. After 3 or more years of experience, you can go on to audit other coders and travel around. This job brings great pay. Good Luck!

For coding typing speed does not matter, but in order to get an entry level medical office job you may have to have a typing test. I am not the best typist either but I spent some time brushing up on my typing skills anyway. There are lots of free online tests you can take and it is always good to be prepared.

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rhit2002 in Downers Grove, Illinois

71 months ago

I respectfully disagree about not needing typing speed, especially for an entry level coder. An entry level coder will likely code lab and x-ray orders, where speed is the name of the game. You will not even meet production if you can't type fast with accuracy.

If you want to work as a coder for a hospital, get into an Associate Degree program at a local junior college that has an HIM program accredited by AHIMA. If you can successfully complete this program, you should be successful passing the RHIT exam. I read a lot about people saying they can't get a job without experience, but let me tell you, this will open doors for you at hospitals all over the country. I speak from my personal experience and also seeing the hospitals I've worked at hire these new grads. Trust me on this. And if you can't fit your schedule around your local junior college schedule or don't have a program available, go online to AHIMA.org and you can see the on-line degree programs that are available. The only catch is that they are kind of expensive.
During the time you are getting your degree, spend time increasing your typing speed and accuracy. Coding at a hospital means coding all day every day on a computer and speed and accuracy are extremely important.

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Lorraine in Connersville, Indiana

71 months ago

Deepa in Dubai, United Arab Emirates said: Hi Lorraine,
Am following your posts closely. Am a CPC-H coder with five years of coding experience. I would like to get AHIMA certification. Please suggest me which one would be more appropriate for me.
If CCS, then what are the study materials shd i follow?
Thanks
Deepa

Hi Deepa,

With 5 years under your belt, I would suggest getting the CCS. I remember helping you with some inpatient coding last year--do you have both inpatient and outpatient coding experience? If so, that will definitely help you in passing the exam. I don't know of specific titles for CCS Exam study guides, but there are several in print.

Lorraine

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Lorraine in Connersville, Indiana

71 months ago

rhit2002 in Downers Grove, Illinois said: I respectfully disagree about not needing typing speed, especially for an entry level coder. An entry level coder will likely code lab and x-ray orders, where speed is the name of the game. You will not even meet production if you can't type fast with accuracy.

If you want to work as a coder for a hospital, get into an Associate Degree program at a local junior college that has an HIM program accredited by AHIMA. If you can successfully complete this program, you should be successful passing the RHIT exam. I read a lot about people saying they can't get a job without experience, but let me tell you, this will open doors for you at hospitals all over the country. I speak from my personal experience and also seeing the hospitals I've worked at hire these new grads. Trust me on this. And if you can't fit your schedule around your local junior college schedule or don't have a program available, go online to AHIMA.org and you can see the on-line degree programs that are available. The only catch is that they are kind of expensive.
During the time you are getting your degree, spend time increasing your typing speed and accuracy. Coding at a hospital means coding all day every day on a computer and speed and accuracy are extremely important.

I completely agree.

I worked alongside several coders who may have known their job well, but constantly struggled with productivity standards due to their slow keyboarding speed. Once you code certain chart types a while, you get to the point of memorizing codes--at that point, coding becomes more of a 10-key operation for many coders. I would practice keyboarding and 10-key either in a class or at home. It will definitely pay off later on the job.

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confused in Chicago, Illinois

71 months ago

Sheri in Dallas, Texas said: yes, RN's can apply for medical coding auditing jobs (40-60k). Even if you let your lic lapse, you have the background so go for it. All the A&P, patho, and pharmo will be easy to breeze through as it should be just a review for you and all you will need to do is learn how to look up codes which you can teach yourself. I did and passed the CCA and am now about to sit for the CCS-P. Go for it!

Hi - Do you have to take the CCA exam before you can take the CCS-P exam? If you take the course at AHIMA, are you educated enought to sit for the CCS-P exam? My job requires a CCS-P or CPC certificate and wanting to know which route to go. I don't have any prior coding experience. I am in healthcare and do use the CPT/ICD-9 book for precertifying but not to bill. I guess I'm wanting to know once I take the AHIMA approced coding course, I'll have the knowelege to sit for the CCS-P exam. PLEASE HELP!

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Teresa in Fayetteville, North Carolina

71 months ago

I noticed you are in Dallas, TX. Is there a lot of coding jobs in the Fort Worth-Dallas area? I am moving to the Fort Worth-Dallas area and just wondering is there a lot of coding jobs out there? Thank you.

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confused in Chicago, Illinois

70 months ago

Thank you so much for the detail information. That clears up a lot of
?s I had. Thanks.

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Trish in Sturgis, Michigan

70 months ago

Jennifer in Dayton, Ohio said: If you can retain #'s easily (memorize them and know their meaning) 829.0 = fracture (very unspecific code) but just to give you an idea. If you have to constantly check your books on every code, it may not be the way to go......but your nursing background should help you alot, yes for the A&P knowledge, reading doctor's handwriting..... etc

Actually, most places (at least hospitals) have coder software..you should't have to be memorizing anything...I am a nurse for 25 years...I have just taken
the CPC exam....I used Carol Bucks books..can order them online or get at Barnes & Nobles....great book...I also took at refresher coding class...
Memorizing codes is the OLD way ...back when a coder relied strictly on the book...those days hopefully are over....Good Luck

My experience is that people who think they can memorize codes...are totally screwed up when the new changes come out....each year...

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Buffy in Salt Lake City, Utah

70 months ago

You make reference to the point that most employers are looking for RHIT/ RHIA cert for entry level positions. In addition to the cert, are they also looking for several years of experience as a medical coder or is the cert in lieu of the experience?

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Jennifer in Dayton, Ohio

70 months ago

wow that was terribly rude! Good luck to you as well!Shesh!

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Trish in Sturgis, Michigan

70 months ago

Jennifer in Dayton, Ohio said: wow that was terribly rude! Good luck to you as well!Shesh!

Sorry..i did not intend to be rude. I just don't think it is a good idea for people to think they should have to memorize codes..this is hard enough as it is. I just know a few people who thought they had to...and they spent more time
trying to ....than just learning the basics.

I apologize....it was tacky the way I worded it...but it was no reflection on you....:( sorry

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RHIT Coder in Connersville, Indiana

70 months ago

Trish in Sturgis, Michigan said: Sorry..i did not intend to be rude. I just don't think it is a good idea for people to think they should have to memorize codes..this is hard enough as it is. I just know a few people who thought they had to...and they spent more time
trying to ....than just learning the basics.

I apologize....it was tacky the way I worded it...but it was no reflection on you....:( sorry

No one said you HAD to memorize codes. But it does come as part of the job, after doing it for a long time.

Even after coding ERs for 3 months in my first job 11 years ago, you do remember the code for a simple headache, unspecified HTN, etc.

And as far as slamming the use of coding books...well, your inexperience and naivete are showing. All good coders keep a book at their desk in the event the coding path in their encoder isn't reaching the desired code.

Or in the event--and it does happen--that the system goes down. Coding supervisors typically don't want their employees to be sitting idle.

Surprising that your instructor never told you that.

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vanessa in Flushing, New York

70 months ago

RHIT Coder in Connersville, Indiana said: No one said you HAD to memorize codes. But it does come as part of the job, after doing it for a long time.

Even after coding ERs for 3 months in my first job 11 years ago, you do remember the code for a simple headache, unspecified HTN, etc.

And as far as slamming the use of coding books...well, your inexperience and naivete are showing. All good coders keep a book at their desk in the event the coding path in their encoder isn't reaching the desired code.

Or in the event--and it does happen--that the system goes down. Coding supervisors typically don't want their employees to be sitting idle.

Surprising that your instructor never told you that.

RHIT Coder in Indiana, I am glad you were able to set the record straight. I didn't want to give my opinion because i am not yet a coder; but as you said, after working in the profession for a while there are some codes you know from memory, and nothing is wrong with that.

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Trish in Sturgis, Michigan

70 months ago

I never slammed coding books...I always use mine all day long....in addition to Encoder.....
I first started coding in 1991...
I apologized to Jennifer in Ohio for how I worded my response to her statement
yesterday..never meant for it to sound rude...
but that response was sent to her............
Actually I had a great instructor...
OK: Here is the last post on this. Coding books are wonderful and so is Encoder. Hopefully Jennifer forgave me for being tacky
:(... so lets get past it....and move on...

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Trish in Sturgis, Michigan

70 months ago

Ok
One more time, Coding books are great. I have 4. Software is great. I have 2.
I love it. I did not say there was anything was wrong with having some codes in your head..you've learned from memory.
I hope this gets puts to rest soon. Geeze. Lets move on!

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VickiMarie in Sturgis, Michigan

70 months ago

Hi Trish-I am from Sturgis also, so I have your back! How do you like coding, and do you work in Sturgis? I want to start taking classes this month.

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Trish in Sturgis, Michigan

70 months ago

Well Good Grief...I have found a friend here... Ha HA I was about to get worried..Just joking....
.I am a nurse auditor and work at Borgess in Kzoo. Have coded off and on since 91. Mostly auditing...I love my job!...I took a refresher course with Ryan at Bronson in Kzoo...very good class
I took the CPC finally in January...feels good to have the certification...Do you work here in town?

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Teresa in Fayetteville, North Carolina

70 months ago

Could you give me some information about the CPC test? I am going to sit and take the exam in May and I was just wondering what it is like. Some people say they had to take it several times and some say they only had to take it once.

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coder4 in Georgia

70 months ago

Hi Teresa,
Email me offline and I can share with you several tips about the CPC exam. handmaiden5@bellsouth.net

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VickiMarie in Sturgis, Michigan

70 months ago

I actually was going to school for cardiac sonography, but the internship was switched to Saginaw Michigan, and I became the legal guardian of a 2 and 5 year old about 6 weeks ago. I have a house here and I thought that coding would be something I would like. Plus, I could take the courses online. Oh, and congratulations on your certification! I plan on starting classes at the end of this month.

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Trish in Sturgis, Michigan

70 months ago

I took it in November...got to ? 55 and the instructor said you should be half way..I freaked...I rushed through Section 2..since I was confortable with Lab Anes E/M..my error...I aced Section 1 and Section 3 and did not pass Sect 2. I purchased the carol Buck
CPC Exam Practice Book at Barnes & Noble and I retook Jan 31 and passed all sections...Man did that feel good HA
I had heard to take Sect 3 first and get it out of the way..simpler..and I did that the second time around. Section 1 was where I was most nervous
so this last time I did 3 then 1 & 2. The C Buck exam practice book
was very good...I used the 2008 book for 2009 test..don't think that made a diff..it mainly helped me practice with speed. It has a pre test..that you take before doing any studying..so if you ace E/M..don't spend too much time going back over it every day..etc
post test..and then the final. All 3 have a timer and when you sign out you can start right back in at the same timer...
One important thing to remember...circle the ones you know you need to come back to....in your book as you go on the test..they say not to write in your testbooklet..but I figured for 350.00 I needed to
make myself a note here and there...and also donot get in a panic
if the time is halfway through and you are not on 75 or beyond...the last part is easier....also practice at home at least a 3 hour run.alot....also work on it a little everyday..even 30 minutes if you can..especially on the 10000 to 60000 codes which on my test were Sect 1
Good Luck..you'll do great A friend and I practiced together..doing like 10-20 questions at a time and increasing our speed..
I would advise getting this book..also she offers a CPC-H too.
You could order it used on line...the 2008 edition is fine for this year....any codes that might have changed for 2009..you know it when you take the test and look it up..you can most likely eliminate 2 answers as wrong right away..Email me how you do...good luck

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Jennifer in Dayton, Ohio

70 months ago

I do forgive you now and would love to move on from this topic. You didn't sound sorry until I read this so I appreciate the apology and apparent support of my fellow coders! Thanks guys!

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rose of sharon in Smyrna, Georgia

70 months ago

HI Everyone
I have a question can I just buy coding books on cpc and study from them and then take test.

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Gregg in Youngstown, Ohio

70 months ago

Hi, you can get a free 20 question practice exam or a full length one for cheap at medicalcodingpro.com. Best of luck.

Gregg

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maybecoding in Garland, Texas

70 months ago

CODERANALYST2005 in Garland, Texas said: When you have been coding ten years( I'm 30) and you tend to see the same situation everyday, from Dept. Heads and and on a corporate level,and you plan this is going to be your career and want to move ahead into, audit findings, E/M consulting and Consulting travel, the AHIMA cert is a certain thing, It is not a discredit to anyone trying to better themselves, but why reach for some and not all... outpatient coding is where I started and will be most grateful for all my mentors coaching, but as a well rounded coder you must code Multi-specialty this is where the need is and will always be. Inpatient, OP-notes, APC classifications and DRG's are pertinent. NO insult to AAPC credentials just a real world fact.

The only place that is AHIMA certified in the area is Baylor and they have to hire you in order for you to attend. I am looking at other schools that have a National Certificaton but it is not through AHIMA, will I still be able to get a job or will I need to get certified through AHIMA as well as the National Certification that I will be sitting for? Thanks for the help.

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Trish in Sturgis, Michigan

70 months ago

Coderanalyst: I agree. I have been auditing 25 years and some of that coding also..I just finally got certified as CPC. But I would feel alot better if I had my cert through AHIMA. I a m 50 years old....and if I was just starting out I would do the AHIMA
cert...no disrespect to CPC..just got it and I am very happy I passed....but as things change in the audit world and about to change in the coding world..I wish I had started this second venture sooner....and not at 50 HA HA

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vanessa in Flushing, New York

70 months ago

Trish in Sturgis, Michigan said: Coderanalyst: I agree. I have been auditing 25 years and some of that coding also..I just finally got certified as CPC. But I would feel alot better if I had my cert through AHIMA. I a m 50 years old....and if I was just starting out I would do the AHIMA
cert...no disrespect to CPC..just got it and I am very happy I passed....but as things change in the audit world and about to change in the coding world..I wish I had started this second venture sooner....and not at 50 HA HA

Trish, as they say better late than never. I am glad you did not procrastinate for ten years and get the CPC at 60 lol. Since you already know the basic you should purchase the Professional Review Guide and study and see where you go from there. Juat a thought.

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asial in Elk Grove Village, Illinois

70 months ago

I am taking CCS on Monday. Any tips?

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Jennifer in South Bend, Indiana

70 months ago

I am an entry level coder by any means. I have roughly 6 months experience coding and have completed my coding certificate. I am now looking at the certification exams. I am considering the AHIMA CCA (entry level) or AAPC CPC exam. Has anyone out here taken both? Has anyone take the AHIMA CCA that knows of good study material? The AAPC seems to offer much better study material for their exam. Thanks!

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Jennifer in South Bend, Indiana

70 months ago

Have you taken the AHIMA CCA? I understand it is 100 questions, 2 hours long, but they dont really offer much study material. Any advice on study materials to seek out?

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Jennifer in South Bend, Indiana

70 months ago

Annie in Millington, Michigan said: Oh, and I am pretty pro-AHIMA, but I wouldn't go for the CCA credential IMO. I don't think a lot of employers recgonize it and it is equal to or lower proficiency than the CPC. (Again, IMO, I'm sure there are areas that differ.) I do think the CCS is worth shooting for, though I've heard it is pretty hard.

I just took the CPC and passed, and after two years of school I found it extremely easy. But I am afraid of the CCS exam! We did the prep books in my coding internship and they were so hard.

*****For the AAPC CPC exam, do you believe someone such as myself who passed a coding program, but has been out for 2 years could brush up and pass this?*** I am trying to choose b/w this and the AHIMA CCA. Thanks!!!

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stargazer@travel2newplaces.com in Troy, New York

69 months ago

Is taking the CCP exam a requirement if someone prefer's working for a Dr.'s office rather than a hospital?

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khanbarkath in Kuwait

68 months ago

Nicole in Dublin, California said: I just read in Ahima's fine print: "The CCA exam is not linked to any formal education or training in coding."

All you need is a high school diploma to qualify for the CCA. So basically, you can go to school for coding ANYWHERE to sit for the exam.

In another section, I read "it is strongly recommended that you have at least 6 mos of experience OR have completed an AHIMA-approved coding certificate program or other formal education program."

Same for the CCS and CCS-P exams - there are no specific education requirements, just recommendations on how long you should have worked in the field before taking the exam.

This cleared alot up for me on schooling. I didn't realize it doesn't really matter where you go to school, just as long as you can study to pass the AHIMA exam.

It's exactly like when I got my real estate license.. it didn't matter WHERE I took the Real Estate Principles class to qualify for the state exam, I just had to pass the state exam to become real estate licensed. No one ever asks where you took the class because it doesn't matter!

I want to now how i can give exam of cca i am in this feald from 6 years can you provide me details about this exam of cca

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khanbarkath in Kuwait

68 months ago

please provide me details of cca exam how i can give this exam i am in this feald from 6 years so i want to see i can give this exam are not thanks a lot

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