Medical Coding - Online Schools like Allied?

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Shawn in Indianapolis, Indiana

77 months ago

Well I definitely agree with both you ladies. I am young adult. I graduated college with a 2yr degree in medical coding in 2004. Not a on-line course, 6month course or straight from your kitchen counter course (LOL). I thought I did all my research I choose a good school.I was hospitalized due to lack of sleep,stress etc working two full-time jobs determined to finish school(4.0). Well shortly after graduation I noticed employers were requesting experience outside of school. Now, I do understand that because I can easily see how countless of things can go wrong (financially being the biggest). But what I don't understand is, how can I get experience if no one will give me the chance. I searched & searched and just came to the conclusion that I wasted my time and money. I've put that on the back burner. I am now continuing education at IUPUI.Some people say I'm crazy and school is useless, well I just try to look at it as the Good Lord has another plan for me & try to remain faithful. My whole point is it seems to me that a degree doesn't mean anything unless one can show some sort of experience or atleast active in that field in some way in order to even be considered for employment. What I have seen, and not just in the medical field ranges of employers/jobs were employers want experience. In most cases they will help you get the degree or certification or what ever, but they need to still be able to "use you" (lack of better term) until then. Now, I could be wrong thats just my experience and what I am witnessing today. What scares me is that, I know twice as many people with degrees and can not find suitable employment, as opposed to those with no degree but of any such but with the experience and living very comfortably. YOU LADIES SEEM TO BE OLDER THAN ME & MORE EXPERIENCED AND IN THE WORKFORCE LONGER THAN I HAVE, But tell me if this is what my future looks like.

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Lorraine W. in Connersville, Indiana

77 months ago

Shawn in Indianapolis, Indiana said: Well I definitely agree with both you ladies. I am young adult. I graduated college with a 2yr degree in medical coding in 2004. Not a on-line course, 6month course or straight from your kitchen counter course (LOL). I thought I did all my research I choose a good school. My whole point is it seems to me that a degree doesn't mean anything unless one can show some sort of experience or atleast active in that field in some way in order to even be considered for employment. What I have seen, and not just in the medical field ranges of employers/jobs were employers want experience. In most cases they will help you get the degree or certification or what ever, but they need to still be able to "use you" (lack of better term) until then. Now, I could be wrong thats just my experience and what I am witnessing today. What scares me is that, I know twice as many people with degrees and can not find suitable employment, as opposed to those with no degree but of any such but with the experience and living very comfortably. YOU LADIES SEEM TO BE OLDER THAN ME & MORE EXPERIENCED AND IN THE WORKFORCE LONGER THAN I HAVE, But tell me if this is what my future looks like.

First of all, do you have your RHIT credential? Secondly, what kind of work experience do you have? Lastly, have you actually applied for coding work, or are you reading the job requirements (experience) and not venturing further?

Your 2-year degree--was it a Health Info Tech course?--qualifies you for much more than coding, if opportunities aren't available yet. When there are few openings for coders, experienced ones get the jobs first--it's just reality. But when they can't find experienced ones, or if they have openings and the budget to train, new coders are more readily hired.

There is a lot more to a medical records/HIM department than coding--don't give up. :)

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Lawanda Myers-Smtih in Athens, Georgia

77 months ago

Has anyone taken the Medical Administrative Assistant course at Allied? If so is it or was it easy to find a job after obtaining only a certificate? I am looking to get into the medical field, and I have no other Medical experience or training other than me just obtaining my CNAs. Is Allied a good way to go or will it just be a waist of time and money. I am a military spouse so going to a 2 year college to gain an associates, again at this point is hard. I have already been to college for 2 years but obtained a licensure in another field, no associates but a diploma for college. Is Allied a good idea? HELP...

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Kate in Hershey, Pennsylvania

77 months ago

Has anyone taken both Allied's Medical Billing course and then the Medical Coding course? I first was just going to just do the medical coding and then someone at work started talking about taking the billing course along with it. I was thinking about it, just that way I would have a knowledge of both.

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Lois Mae in Rocklin, California

77 months ago

If you were to do medical billing at home. How much are people making? I live in Ca. Should you only go through Ahima or AAPC? I was told that. But if you only do Medical billing what school is your best choice?

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jan in Glen Burnie, Maryland

76 months ago

Actually, I work in medical records and talk with coders. All of the ones I work with are not rhia or rhit. They are ccs and a few are ccs eligible. Most of them finished at a community college and got hired very quickly. The ease of finding a job must depend on where you live. My friend's mother also took coding last year on a AHIMA accredited online program and now works at ANNE ARUNDEL MEDICAL CENTER. She has had previous hospital experience. Maybe they factored that in too.

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2Sexy in Hattiesburg, Mississippi

76 months ago

jan in Glen Burnie, Maryland said: Actually, I work in medical records and talk with coders. All of the ones I work with are not rhia or rhit. They are ccs and a few are ccs eligible. Most of them finished at a community college and got hired very quickly. The ease of finding a job must depend on where you live. My friend's mother also took coding last year on a AHIMA accredited online program and now works at ANNE ARUNDEL MEDICAL CENTER. She has had previous hospital experience. Maybe they factored that in too.

What about the CPC certification? Do you know of any people that are working with the AAPC's certification? I see a lot of job openings that are requiring the RHIA or RHIT certification. That is why I'm trying to decide to continue with Allied's program because it only allows you to take the exam with the AAPC.

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Jan in Brooklyn, Maryland

76 months ago

Alas, no. Actually, the one woman who is a coder on evenings does have CPC but she told me she was only considered because she has been coding for years and she has to go ahead and get a CCS anyway. I know most defnitely our hospital prefers CCS or RHIT certification. They post that you need two years of experience but I talked personally to the coding supervisor. She actually hires alot of new CCS certified coders. I think CCS will probably get you further. Also, my same coding friend told me that when you join ahima.org you start getting some kind of mailing list thing with jobs on it. I will ask her again about that.

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2Sexy in Hattiesburg, Mississippi

76 months ago

Jan in Brooklyn, Maryland said: Alas, no. Actually, the one woman who is a coder on evenings does have CPC but she told me she was only considered because she has been coding for years and she has to go ahead and get a CCS anyway. I know most defnitely our hospital prefers CCS or RHIT certification. They post that you need two years of experience but I talked personally to the coding supervisor. She actually hires alot of new CCS certified coders. I think CCS will probably get you further. Also, my same coding friend told me that when you join ahima.org you start getting some kind of mailing list thing with jobs on it. I will ask her again about that.

I thought you had to have some years of experience before you were able to take the Certified Coding Specialist exam. Is that right? Anyway, I think I wasted some money going through Allied's program when it only prepares you for AAPC's test. Anyway, I'm trying to work on my certification through an alternate route to become a teacher. I might go back and take the AAPC's exam, but right now I'm thinking that teaching will be an option for me right now. :)

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Lae in San Antonio, Texas

76 months ago

Hello everyone...
I'm totally new to this career. I was reading your comments and see that most of you agree that employers look for AHIMA. If this is so, what online course would you recommend to prepare me for that certification? I have seen several but it's all beginning to get a lil "blurry". I have seen PCDI, ALLIED, ONLINECAREERADVANCEMENT and several others. Is there a particular one anyone would like to agree on? Your input would be greatly appreciated.

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ecj in Trenton, Michigan

76 months ago

Lorraine W. in Connersville, Indiana said: First of all, do you have your RHIT credential? Secondly, what kind of work experience do you have? Lastly, have you actually applied for coding work, or are you reading the job requirements (experience) and not venturing further?

Your 2-year degree--was it a Health Info Tech course?--qualifies you for much more than coding, if opportunities aren't available yet. When there are few openings for coders, experienced ones get the jobs first--it's just reality. But when they can't find experienced ones, or if they have openings and the budget to train, new coders are more readily hired.

There is a lot more to a medical records/HIM department than coding--don't give up. :)

Lorraine: I hope you will respond. I am medical transcriptionist. Over 10+ year of experience both in-house and at home transcribing. I am considering going for RHIT or RHIA. All these people who cannot find jobs are spooking me. I am a single Mom and burnt out totally on transcribing. Going for RHIT/RHIA seems the most logical course of career transitions as it is related (but realize not the same). I wondered for entry -level positions once I do obtain the RHIT or RHIA credentials and degree would the years of transcription experience and working in-hour at several hospitals help me get a foot in the door in HIM?

I am also considering patient care rolls such as nursing, but I am 40 and to I think my personality and aptitudes are better served working medical records.

Any thoughts or advice. I realize nursing jobs are more plentiful.

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2Sexy in Hattiesburg, Mississippi

76 months ago

ecj in Trenton, Michigan said: Lorraine: I hope you will respond. I am medical transcriptionist. Over 10+ year of experience both in-house and at home transcribing. I am considering going for RHIT or RHIA. All these people who cannot find jobs are spooking me. I am a single Mom and burnt out totally on transcribing. Going for RHIT/RHIA seems the most logical course of career transitions as it is related (but realize not the same). I wondered for entry -level positions once I do obtain the RHIT or RHIA credentials and degree would the years of transcription experience and working in-hour at several hospitals help me get a foot in the door in HIM?

I am also considering patient care rolls such as nursing, but I am 40 and to I think my personality and aptitudes are better served working medical records.

Any thoughts or advice. I realize nursing jobs are more plentiful.

I know your message was for Loraine, but why are you thinking about going into nursing if you have experience in records? Most people that go into records, do it solely for the purpose of not having to deal with patients on a contact basis. If you like the office environment, I doubt you would like nursing. Even though there are a lot of openings in nursing, it is for a reason. Many people leave the profession of nursing because they get burned out quickly. So I wouldn't go into nursing for the money or for the amount of available positions you are seeing. Keep in mind that there are a lot of openings for a reason. I have talked to many nurses and many of them are trying to find other areas in nursing so they don't have to work with patients, such as teaching in a nursing school or changing careers all together. At the age of 40, I wouldn't suggest you to go into the nursing field. Since you have a child, it would be conducive to find a career that will work with your child's schedule. Medical records wouldn't take you off of your child's schedule as nursing would.

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ecj in Trenton, Michigan

76 months ago

That is why I felt records would be a better fit, but I was concerned about the availability of jobs. I hate to invest time and effort into schooling and not be able to find a position.

All the concerns you stated were the ones I have regarding nursing... the stress, burnout, etc.

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David in Wellesley, Massachusetts

76 months ago

I completed a subsidized program www.onlinecareeradvancement.com/mcp/Personlaized_Learning_Program.html and got help finding a job.

Nicole in Dublin, California said: Has anyone done their medical coding education completely online? Does anyone have any experience with AlliedSchools.com?

And have you been able to get a job with your online education?

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2Sexy in Hattiesburg, Mississippi

76 months ago

ecj in Trenton, Michigan said: That is why I felt records would be a better fit, but I was concerned about the availability of jobs. I hate to invest time and effort into schooling and not be able to find a position.

All the concerns you stated were the ones I have regarding nursing... the stress, burnout, etc.

Yeah, that is something you have to consider with medical records. I feel that I have wasted money on Allied's program, because I didn't do enough research on this career field. Allied only prepares you for the AAPC exam and all the jobs that I have seen require you to have an AHIMA certification. Also, they are requiring at least 2-3 years of experience. If I had done research on this field, I probably wouldn't have ever enrolled in a program. I don't like career fields that aren't willing to train you or give you a chance. I do understand why you would want to go into nursing because at least they do train new graduates.

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Lorraine W. in Connersville, Indiana

76 months ago

ecj in Trenton, Michigan said: Lorraine: I hope you will respond. I am medical transcriptionist. Over 10+ year of experience both in-house and at home transcribing. I am considering going for RHIT or RHIA. All these people who cannot find jobs are spooking me. I am a single Mom and burnt out totally on transcribing. Going for RHIT/RHIA seems the most logical course of career transitions as it is related (but realize not the same). I wondered for entry -level positions once I do obtain the RHIT or RHIA credentials and degree would the years of transcription experience and working in-hour at several hospitals help me get a foot in the door in HIM?

I am also considering patient care rolls such as nursing, but I am 40 and to I think my personality and aptitudes are better served working medical records.

Any thoughts or advice. I realize nursing jobs are more plentiful.

One thing you really might consider doing is to contact med records/HIM department heads directly and ask them about your situation. One thing I have found after reading so many posts on this site is that every region's facilities are different. Where one area will hire coders without formal training, others require RHIT/CCS plus experience..and others will consider new grads where others will not.

You might also want to contact remote coding companies and ask the same questions.

At least, if you do decide to pursue an RHIT or RHIA, your prior classes in terminology and physiology (I'm assuming you took the physiology) will count toward your degree. Another plus I see is that you have extensive experience in working independently, which is a must for coding.

Definitely check out AHIMA to see where a credentialed school is in your area, then contact the program director (or view their online curriculum if available) and see if they have on-site practice. Many have found that to be invaluable in finding work after graduation--it does count as experience.

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ecj in Trenton, Michigan

76 months ago

2Sexy in Hattiesburg, Mississippi said: Yeah, that is something you have to consider with medical records. I feel that I have wasted money on Allied's program, because I didn't do enough research on this career field. Allied only prepares you for the AAPC exam and all the jobs that I have seen require you to have an AHIMA certification. Also, they are requiring at least 2-3 years of experience. If I had done research on this field, I probably wouldn't have ever enrolled in a program. I don't like career fields that aren't willing to train you or give you a chance. I do understand why you would want to go into nursing because at least they do train new graduates.

With nursing at least your a pretty much guaranteed a job. I am in Michigan and things are very bad here. But nursing is one area where you can definitely get a job and agood paying one entry-level. But was being honest that my personality and background is more suited to HIM fields. However, you can be suited for it but if you cannot find a job in it then what is the point of time and investment into the degrees.

I have seen several RHIT positions and some CCS. Most straight coding wants experience, but some of the RHIT/RHIT while they also want experience for high level management positions, I have seen a few jobs locally where it's just the RHIT or RHIA certification they are seeking predominantly.

And to Lorraine yes I have taken most of the nursing prereqs so have a full year of anatomy and physiology, chemistry, pharmacology, and I have certification in Medical Transcription and an Associates Degree in Science. And as I 10+ years as a transcriptionist. Definitely can work indpendently. The bulk of my time working MT has been at-home for hospitals or IC work. I just want the security of 401k, insurance and steady hourly and/or salaried position at this stage of my life.

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Lorraine W. in Connersville, Indiana

76 months ago

ecj in Trenton, Michigan said: And to Lorraine yes I have taken most of the nursing prereqs so have a full year of anatomy and physiology, chemistry, pharmacology, and I have certification in Medical Transcription and an Associates Degree in Science. And as I 10+ years as a transcriptionist. Definitely can work indpendently. The bulk of my time working MT has been at-home for hospitals or IC work. I just want the security of 401k, insurance and steady hourly and/or salaried position at this stage of my life.

I hear ya. One other benefit of the RHIT/RHIA is the training for other areas besides coding, including Release of Information. You might also look into other related areas including Health Informatics and Tumor Registry.

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Tatia

76 months ago

Hi Michelle,

I am a preschool owner and I love the medical field, but I am looking also for a job to do at home. I was considering medical transcription or billing. I need also to know how do I get started do I go to Allied. I did major in nursing and I took human anatomy ,but I change my major to education. Please help me! You can email me at Tatiatt@aol.com!
Thank you so much!
May god continue to bless you!

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Michelle Rimmer.CHI,CBCS in Brick, New Jersey

76 months ago

Hi Tatia,

I respnded to your personal email address......check your spam if not rec'd in regular email :-)

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Shawn in Indianapolis, Indiana

76 months ago

I am sorry Tatia I did not respond. I had stop reading the emails from forum a while ago, because it seemed as if most of the women were just cat fighting. But was was your question, I'd be glad to answer as best I can

Thanks!

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Melony T. in West Hills, California

76 months ago

David,
Not trying to be stuck up or anything, but I would be hesitant to pay for a course when the adress has "personalized" misspelled.

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Tatia

76 months ago

Michelle Rimmer.CHI,CBCS in Brick, New Jersey said: Hi Tatia,

I respnded to your personal email address......check your spam if not rec'd in regular email :-)

Thank you for responding and may God continue to bless you! Your information was very helpful!
Thanks again

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Michelle Rimmer,CHI,CBCS in Brick, New Jersey

76 months ago

You are very welcome Tatia---and thank you for praying for God to continue to bless me.....

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2Sexy in Hattiesburg, Mississippi

76 months ago

Thank God for blessing us all! God is good all the time, yes God is Good! I just felt like giving him praise! :)

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Choua in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

76 months ago

Wow, this is interesting...I'm barely new to this website and it seems like you guys all have so much to say. I'm currently taking the Medical Coding Program w/Allied right now. I'm hoping to advance in my company in the near future so I might as well start now. I'm only a data entry specialist but I figured if I wanted to make more money I could learn this stuff now and grow from it since I'm already in the medical field. Allied does prepare you for the AAPC exam only. I believe AHIMA is more for people who are working in hospital settings...I actually took Allied's program because they offer the JANET and actually gave me my own laptop even though the laptop is probably worth only $500 or so. It's worth it. I only need my CPC certification because I work for a billing dept under private physicians only. I'm not really looking into a hospital setting or anything so am I going in the right direction? I thought that maybe in the future if I decide to grow more into coding after a little more experience in this field...Maybe I can go and get certified in AHIMA too but for now I think that CPC would be good for me. Am I correct? Give me some thoughts....

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naenae in Las Vegas, Nevada

76 months ago

I am just now starting the medical coding course and i am really trying not to give up, it is so hard to comprehend. Im taking an online course at penn foster but im wondering if i will comprehend it better going to an actual site for the class, any suggestions

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Michelle Rimmer,CHI,CBCS in Brick, New Jersey

76 months ago

Hi Naenae,

Don't give up!!! What are you having the most difficulty with? CPT, HCPCS, or ICD-9? I can try and help you if you post your question or problems......

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MICHELLE..... in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

76 months ago

I have a few questions for you...
What's the difference between people who learn Medical Billing and Coding than people who just go into Medical coding.

Does that mean that people who learn Billing and coding...
Codes the charts and bill the patient? How does that side work?
Do they get pay more?
Sorry..I'm kinda new to this...
Thanks...
Choua

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Choua in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

76 months ago

Oh I c...For my company..We have coders alone while people who are actually billing and doing the statement..We actually call them research. Why is that? Is it because every company does things differently?

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naenae in Las Vegas, Nevada

76 months ago

michelle r
right now im just on cpt, it seems that i find the right code, but im one number off on my answer key

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Michelle Rimmer in Brick, New Jersey

76 months ago

Naenae,

you are prob speaking of indented codes, right? Make sure to read the full description to the end.......ages, lengths, amount, etc....

Practice, practice, practice :-)

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Susan

76 months ago

I am looking at other Medical Coding schools besides Allied. Why is that the most popular? There's Stonecliffe College and Bryant and Stratton which are on-line colleges. What's up with Allied? They seemed kind of pricy to me.

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Choua in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

76 months ago

Susan said: I am looking at other Medical Coding schools besides Allied. Why is that the most popular? There's Stonecliffe College and Bryant and Stratton which are on-line colleges. What's up with Allied? They seemed kind of pricy to me.

It depends what you're looking for. I personally went with Allied because what I need is only a CPC test to be able to code for my company. Allied is most popular and well known which gives you a better chance of findind a job because they're known for graduates that gets more job after taking their school courses plus a majority of companys are contracted/connected to Allied and they are always looking to find more coders from Allied. Besides Bryant and Stratton didn't offer what I needed online. However, they did offer it on campus but I don't have the time to attend their school schedule which will also include weekends.

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Melony in West Hills, California

76 months ago

Grace in Sarasota, Florida said: This is all great information. I am thinking of taking an online Medical Coding Course and I have found out a lot from you guys..well girls. ;) Thanks! I think I am going to try the self-study course on the AHIMA website which is the original one I was looking at.

Grace,
Can you give me a link for the self study portion at AHIMA? I cannot find it

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naenae in Las Vegas, Nevada

76 months ago

thanks michelle, can i email you if i have any further problems

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Michelle Rimmer,CHI,CBCS in Brick, New Jersey

76 months ago

Absolutely Naenae!!

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Lorraine W in Connersville, Indiana

75 months ago

Bump.

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Rachel in Auburn, Washington

74 months ago

I have some questions and may need some advice. Currently I am a stay at home mom. I have been considering the Medical Coding and Billing field, everytime I goodle anything medical online Allied comes up. I need something that I can do while my kids are asleep and my husband is at work. Is this school legite and worth taking? My highest level of education is High School Diploma. Would this be a waste of my time? Should I consider other schooling before this cousre?

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Lois Byrd in Rocklin, California

74 months ago

If your considering Medical Coding and looking into working in a hospital. I would go through Ahima. You can do that on line at your own pace. But, I have heard a lot of [people going through Allied. If you go through Ahima I have the books if you want them.

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2Sexy in Hattiesburg, Mississippi

74 months ago

Rachel in Auburn, Washington said: I have some questions and may need some advice. Currently I am a stay at home mom. I have been considering the Medical Coding and Billing field, everytime I goodle anything medical online Allied comes up. I need something that I can do while my kids are asleep and my husband is at work. Is this school legite and worth taking? My highest level of education is High School Diploma. Would this be a waste of my time? Should I consider other schooling before this cousre?

Allied only prepares you for the AAPC Exam. I think I mentioned this in a earlier post. Go back and read some of the things I wrote about Allied.

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Melony T in West Hills, California

74 months ago

Lois Byrd in Rocklin, California said: If your considering Medical Coding and looking into working in a hospital. I would go through Ahima. You can do that on line at your own pace. But, I have heard a lot of [people going through Allied. If you go through Ahima I have the books if you want them.

Lois,
Can you tell me how much the books cost you? I want to sit for the CCS soon.

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help please in Milford, Indiana

74 months ago

Has anyone gone through the on-line medical transciption course with Allied? Was it difficult? I'm looking to work from home.

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Annie in Millington, Michigan

74 months ago

There seems to be a lot of confusion about which school to go to, what credential to seek, etc...

Research, research, research!

AHIMA offers the RHIT and RHIA credentials--but only through approved schools. You have to go through their site to find out which schools are eligible. Otherwise you could go through a two year HIT program only to find out that you cannot take the RHIT exam. RHIT's/RHIA's learn a lot of coding, but also other areas including billing, medical records, HIPAA, release of information, etc. It is considered an allied health degree like nursing, respiratory therapy, etc, etc, so it also makes you eligible for things like becoming a tumor registrar or privacy officer.

AHIMA also has the ccs credentials which are coding credentials. This credential does not require any schooling, though the teachers I had were very clear that this is a tough credential to earn (something like a 65% pass rate) and not for the new graduate. They also offer the CCA which is an entry level coding credential that is not widely recgonized. RHITs are at or above the CCA as far as coding expertise is concerned (though the RHIT has more prestige and is more widely known).

AAPC is focused on coding and they offer the CPC credentials. In order to earn the CPC you have to have two years of work experience (or one year school+one year of work). If you don't but you pass the test anyway you will earn the CPC-A (apprentice). From what I've been told, the CPC is easier than the CCS--not because the coding is harder but because of the time constraints.

I just graduated from an approved HIT program and I am now RHIT eligible. I also just started my first job as a data collector for medassurant. I am going to take my CPC soon because once I have that credential I can start to train as a reviewer. Then I will study for and take my RHIT. (Plus I also have a BA from a while back.)

continued below...

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Annie in Millington, Michigan

74 months ago

Obviously I am very pro-AHIMA and RHIT/RHIA. The program I completed not only taught me how to take a test (many of the CPC coding courses are test-focused rather than knowledge based) but I learned a lot about the entire field of HIM. I know there are some long-term experienced coders without degrees or certifications who are pretty negative about the people who've been though school. I get that, because so much of coding is based on the daily hands-on experience.

However, many coders who learned hands on have a limited sphere of knowledge. Now that records are transferring to electronic formats and increasing demands are placed on the medical record (in terms of research, risk assessment, etc), employers need people who have experience with the bigger picture.

If I learned nothing else about HIT during school, I learned this:HIT is constantly changing and the people working in this field have to be ready to change as well. Anyone who takes a quick course and then complains about not being handed a job ASAP is actually demonstrating a huge gap in their learning. I am a decent coder for a recent grad, but in no way do I think I am at the level of someone with two years of experience. As a new grad you have to realize that any facility taking you on will be obligated to audit most of your cases for a while to come.

I am so excited about this field that I feel like a total dork sometimes :-) But I also think that people entering it need to be informed. Do your research, call facilities in your area to see what credentials they want, find a mentor and talk to them about their career path, join your local AHIMA or AAPC chapter and find another student to buddy up with. Put a lot of effort into your coursework--one of the reasons I was hired was because I created an audit tool and used it to audit records, then ran stats about the results of the audit all for my final capstone project. WIth hard work it will happen!

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help please in Milford, Indiana

74 months ago

Everyone seems to be talking about medical coding. I'm only interesed in transcription. Has anyone taken the transcription courses?

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2Sexy in Hattiesburg, Mississippi

74 months ago

Annie in Millington, Michigan said: There seems to be a lot of confusion about which school to go to, what credential to seek, etc...

Research, research, research![QUOTE]

Yeah, all this stuff has already been mentioned. I guess they aren't reading all of the forum before they post.

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Lorraine W in Connersville, Indiana

74 months ago

help please in Milford, Indiana said: Everyone seems to be talking about medical coding. I'm only interesed in transcription. Has anyone taken the transcription courses?

Sorry, I think you're in the wrong forum! :)

This should suit you better:

www.indeed.com/forum/job/medical-transcriptionist.html

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Kelly in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

74 months ago

I have read all these helpful replies and I was wondering if somebody could help me with my situation. I have a nursing diploma but never got my RN. Then, I went to Devry University for my Bachelors of Science in Technical Management in Health Services (Basically a health management degree). I will be graduating in August. I will be enrolled in a Medical Transcription course this fall. I was wondering what I can do with my Bachelors degree while attending MT school? When I finish my MT certification, I want to pursue either an RHIA or RHIT certification. Do you know what I could do now while finishing my MT certification at an entry level (meaning what companies would hire somebody like me?)? I am really frustrated right now because I have been pumping out resumes and nobody has been calling me. I guess I should follow-up wiht these employers but I am too busy with finishing this degree. Does anybody know what schools offer affordable yet competitive training for an RHIT or RHIA? Should I be consulting the AHIMA site? I'd really appreciate it if anybody could help me out. Thanks so much.

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1Newbie in Sacramento, California

74 months ago

Hello all!! I have just started the Medical Billing/coding program @ Heald College in Rancho cordova, CA.and I must say I totally understand the concerns on this site. I have noticed that a lot of employers want at least 2 years of experience and I am thinking maybe I should have just went back to school to get my LVN. I figured I would do this because it is a 9 month program, they have job placement(although it is not guaranteed), and it was affordable.I will eventually go back to school to join an R.N program and figured that I could do the medical billing/coding in the meantime.

I'm really worried about the fact the employment is limited for new grads. with no experience. We do have to complete an 80 externship but that is not enough "on the job training" or "hands on" training/experience to get my foot in the door.

Should I start applying at offices and hospitals and just take an entry level job of some sort so at least I am "in there" and might be able to transfer to the billing/coding dept.? I don't know what to do. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you and God bless.

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