Remote coding jobs....don't bother

Comments (51 to 100 of 249)
Page:  « Previous   1  2  3  4  5  Next »   Last »

helenofcoding in New Castle, Pennsylvania

60 months ago

Lanise Freeman in Little Rock, Arkansas said: Wow this is all so true sorry I am a little late on this we are slow here in Akansas I used to work for a Orthropedics clinic and they tried to make me get my CPC I have taken this test once many years ago didnt pass and took it again and didnt pass then there was a girl that did have a CPC-A they nearly made me put in my two weeks and I quit before they fired me.Well of course you know the girl couldnt wait to get the job.Then all of a sudden with in 2months she is a CPC Not a CPC-A. Tell me if I am wrong but how did that happen. I thought you had to have two yrs of on the job. I am not mad just a little upset, work there for 3 yrs and nonthing I cant even find a job now I feel like I did when I finished the 1yr program.Now I work in office job posting and it sucks,I guess I need to be glad I have a job.Why dose everyone have to be certified now I know many people that are not. Yes I have heard that Outsourcing is comining I know alot of clinics are going to EMR and the job I had has a program that doctors can look up there on codes and CPT codes. The whole thing is crazy. I am forced to go back to school now I am 33 yrs old. WOw maybe 40 when i get out.

Lanise....

Medical Coding is serious work and being certified demonstrates to your employer that you have the skills to get the job done right. I am enclosing a link to AHIMA website. AHIMA offers the CCA, CCS, CCS-P credentials, where as AAPC offers the CPC, CPC-H, etc...Check out AHIMA website. Do not give up....you may wish to take the CCA exam first....

www.ahima.org/certification/exam.aspx

Best Wishes....

kw in Port Saint Lucie, Florida

60 months ago

I was also wondering which coding program that you might suggest. I am looking at Speedecoder and Ingenix Coder Pro. I know that if I have a program that is more accurate my productivity will increase as well as keep errors to a minimum if at all!
I was contacted by MRSI, Inc. regarding a remote position. Are you familiar with them?
Thanks again

Leh7335 in Bend, Oregon

60 months ago

Oh.....welcome, and I hope you find every good opportunity available. I would welcome your peaceful discretion over the greedy wreck being made by 3rd generation Americans who never had to leave these shores.

jtholland in Rock Hill, South Carolina

58 months ago

alison kilgore in Raleigh, North Carolina said: I am just starting my own medical billing business from home I have 12 years experience in outpatient, inpatient family medicine, internal medicine, gastroenterology gyn I have just started the process. Looking for clients and marketing myself does anyone have any tips

Hello Alison,
Congrats on starting your own business! I think that is awesome! Are you looking for any coders to work with you?

alison Kilgore in Raleigh, North Carolina

58 months ago

Sorry not at the moment I am starting from the ground up so I am trying still to get clients so really do not have work for anyone at the moment.

HIMCoder in Apopka, Florida

58 months ago

Thank you all for your input, especially helenofcoding in PA for her positive attitude and generosity for sharing her experience and knowledge. I've been having doubts if I should continue towards my AAS in HIM and become AIHMA certified. I plan on continuing towards a BS but unsure if I should go for Health Admin or Informatics. I am open to any advice from those in the field.

HIM is a new career for me as I have to reinvent myself due to the recession. My experience is real estate finance including managerial. I'm willing to relocate (US or abroad) after I get my AAS degree in HIM if the job market in Orlando, Florida isn't profitable. I am open to anyone who can advise me on the job market and starting pay in my area. Where is the best place to relocate to for this type of work as far as job security and compensation?

Thank you everyone for sharing your experiences and guidance. It's well appreciated.

Chris

Mgr Coding and Compliance in Chicago, Illinois

58 months ago

Lanise Freeman in North Little Rock, Arkansas said: OK I dont mean to scare off Coders or the new Coders, Know one is even taking about how doctors are going to have computer assisted dictation and its going to do the coding also for them all they have to do is puch a button and its going to do it for them. Please so one help on this question.

Have we forgotten that medical necessity also drives coding? Of course everyone is looking for cheaper and more efficient ways to do everything, coding included. But with fraud and abuse crackdowns becoming more common from the government, OIG, etc, many docs and hospitals are looking to firm up their coding and compliance teams. (Paying back money in fines is never fun!) ICD-10 will make this even more important. Instead of chucking coding as a career, seek to broaden your base by getting billing knowledge or auditing skills, so that come what may, you can survive.

valentine in Salt Lake City, Utah

58 months ago

Mgr Coding and Compliance in Chicago, Illinois said: Have we forgotten that medical necessity also drives coding? Of course everyone is looking for cheaper and more efficient ways to do everything, coding included. But with fraud and abuse crackdowns becoming more common from the government, OIG, etc, many docs and hospitals are looking to firm up their coding and compliance teams. (Paying back money in fines is never fun!) ICD-10 will make this even more important. Instead of chucking coding as a career, seek to broaden your base by getting billing knowledge or auditing skills, so that come what may, you can survive.

Thank you, this is what I have been saying. Competent coders are needed now more than ever, with the RACs and ICD 10, coding is going to become even more complex and with increased legislation in regards to fraud, physicians need someone they can rely to not only do it, but to do it correctly. I do not believe that we are anywhere near a software program intelligent enough to do it.

I agree, now is the time to increase knowledge and expand your abilities to make yourself marketable.

helenofcoding in New Castle, Pennsylvania

58 months ago

AMEN....could not agree more. The field is changing and those who wish to survive are going to have to "up their game"....stay informed and educated!!!

helenofcoding in New Castle, Pennsylvania

58 months ago

HIMCoder in Apopka, Florida said: Thank you all for your input, especially helenofcoding in PA for her positive attitude and generosity for sharing her experience and knowledge. I've been having doubts if I should continue towards my AAS in HIM and become AIHMA certified. I plan on continuing towards a BS but unsure if I should go for Health Admin or Informatics. I am open to any advice from those in the field.

HIM is a new career for me as I have to reinvent myself due to the recession. My experience is real estate finance including managerial. I'm willing to relocate (US or abroad) after I get my AAS degree in HIM if the job market in Orlando, Florida isn't profitable. I am open to anyone who can advise me on the job market and starting pay in my area. Where is the best place to relocate to for this type of work as far as job security and compensation?

Thank you everyone for sharing your experiences and guidance. It's well appreciated.

Chris

Hi Chris....

I have to tell you that the "best" thing I ever did was to get my RHIT, so I would finish your AS degree in HIM and sit for the RHIT. The RHIT is one of the credentials that the majority of hospitals and remote coding companies accept for "coding".....as far as a BS Degree....I would most definitely go for one In Health Informatics....the future with that is huge!!! Coders will become "coding editors" and Health Informatics will be add so much value to your resume. Also AHIMA offers classes in Clinical Documentation (Specialist) and that too is an excellent choice. I think there are only 4 classes for the Clinical Documentation Specialist...do not give up....the future is bright for the HIM field...hang in there!!!

HIMCoder in Apopka, Florida

58 months ago

Dear HelenofCoding,

Thank you for that piece of information. A young Brit in the forum mentioned a decent coder earns about $110,000 US dollars. I don't understand the large difference. To my understanding, a certified coder in the U.S. earns between $25,000-$40,000. It makes me wonder if all this schooling is worth it for little money.
-Chris

Louise Johnston in Covington, Kentucky

58 months ago

Leh7335 in Bend, Oregon said: Litigation is the key. The training I had in Greek and Latin, this is rediculous. Important to remember, the folks making the decision to outsource are not the docs, its the bean counters who own the docs. I asked my physician father why legal transcription is not outsourced. His response: Lawyers would never allow it. Why do docs? They don't know and can't get the CEO to disclose salary in surgeon meetings. And they ask...

I think you will find that legal work is starting to be outsourced to India. There was an article in the NY Times (I believe) about this in the last week.

helenofcoding in New Castle, Pennsylvania

58 months ago

Hi Chris....

Coder salaries really vary and it depends alot on what part of the country you are in and if you do inpatient, outpatient and or physician coding. Historically, physicians do not pay well. If you work for a remote company you can get a very decent hourly wage depending on the company and the account. If you work in a hospital and are a Coding Manager you can get a very nice salary. I know of a hospital in L.A. California that is paying their Coding Manager about 130,000 a year!!! The last hospital I worked at in southern California was paying their coders about 29.00 - 48.00 an hour (depending on duties, experience and shift). My friend was making 35.00 an hour was an experienced CCS. I now live in the east and saw an ad for 16.00 an hour for an inpatient coder...so once again LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION is key. Also if you get certified and also take additional coursework in Health Informatics and in Clinical Documentation you will also command more money and respect for your qualifications. I predict that eventually AHIMA will follow AAPC's example and offer "specialty certifications" as the work is getting more intense, and there is so much to know with ICD-10/ICD-10-PCS. Physicians specialize...why not coders...

HIMCoder in Apopka, Florida

58 months ago

HelenOfCoding,

You're so kind. Thank you for that wealth of information. It has helped me see things more clearly and aided in my decision. One last question if you please? What is it about medical coding that you like and why? What other benefits aside from monetary coincide with that position?
Chris

helenofcoding in New Castle, Pennsylvania

58 months ago

Hi Chris...

To answer your questions....I switched over to Meical Coding because I wanted the "option" to work from home and unlike some of the other HIM work I have done I do not want to have a daily commute! I like the option of working independently from home (thus avoiding office politics that came with being a consultant). I enjoy coding because I am a very detailed otiented person, a speed reader and I love "putting all the pieces of the puzzle" together on cases. I enjoy intellectual challenges and coding is an excellent fit for me...I have a strong Oncology background and plan to sit for a specialty certification via AAPC as well as the CCS-P via AHIMA. I currently have my RHIT, CTR (Certified Cancer Registrar) and a BS in Health Science...coding really rounds out my HIM training and experience. I am branching out into educational development of coders via writing materials and would love an "adjunct" instructor position (On line). You can follow me on TWITTER under the name HIMpro. The social networking groups are a GREAT way to network....I have made some excellent contacts!!!

HIMCoder in Apopka, Florida

58 months ago

HelenofCoding,

Thank you for sharing about the business. I'm happy to hear all of your accomplishments and that you love what you're doing. You really have given me something to shoot for. Although, I'm only at the beginning, it will take a long time to be where you are. Good luck with the adjunct teaching. I wish you all the best in your careers. Congrats!

-Chris

Jennifer in Decatur, Mississippi

56 months ago

cpc in Milwaukee, Wisconsin said: i currently work for a remote coding company and i also have several friends that do as well- i have to say i disagree with you about all coding jobs moving overseas

I have been coding since 1997. I have been CCS-P certified since 2000. I have coded most all specialties. For the last 10 years I have been coding for Family Practice and Neurology. I have found that I really enjoy the E&M auditing. I would really love to do this from home. I live 45 minutes from my current job. Remote coding would be great for me. Please let me know the names of some of the companies that are reputable that I could send my resume to. Thanks!

J. Van Noy in Dallas, Texas

56 months ago

I work as a documentation and coding manager and have been coding for the past 13 years. While I agree that a lot of jobs are being outsourced to India, I believe we will still have coding work here in the USA. Three of my current employees lost their remote coding positions to outsourcing. I have met people who lost their jobs to outsourcing. What I did about five years ago is enroll back in college on a part-time basis. I was working towards a nursing degree, you cant outsource nurses. At the moment since I am in management, I am enrolled in a business management program. I also have my eye out for what may come in the future, and am working towards health care compliance. So, while may are worried about what may become of their coding jobs, I would recommend thinking of an alternative career within the health care field, get a jump start and be ready for any change that may come your way. Coding has been a great job for me and I would hate to lose my job to outsourcing, but some things we can't control when you work for a large corporation.

Scoots in West Union, Ohio

56 months ago

J. Van Noy in Dallas, Texas said: I work as a documentation and coding manager and have been coding for the past 13 years. While I agree that a lot of jobs are being outsourced to India, I believe we will still have coding work here in the USA. Three of my current employees lost their remote coding positions to outsourcing. I have met people who lost their jobs to outsourcing. What I did about five years ago is enroll back in college on a part-time basis. I was working towards a nursing degree, you cant outsource nurses. At the moment since I am in management, I am enrolled in a business management program. I also have my eye out for what may come in the future, and am working towards health care compliance. So, while may are worried about what may become of their coding jobs, I would recommend thinking of an alternative career within the health care field, get a jump start and be ready for any change that may come your way. Coding has been a great job for me and I would hate to lose my job to outsourcing, but some things we can't control when you work for a large corporation.

Nurses can't be "outsourced", but foreign nurses are being brought into the USA to take our jobs here. I just spent a great deal of time considering nursing myself until I learned that RN graduates are having a super hard time getting hired on anywhere!

Now I am considering something like coding and this is all just so disturbing for someone who is trying to find a new career path. It feels like we are defeated before we start!

kristy in Clearfield, Pennsylvania

55 months ago

cpc in Milwaukee, Wisconsin said: i currently work for a remote coding company and i also have several friends that do as well- i have to say i disagree with you about all coding jobs moving overseas

Do you have any suggestions on how to get started coding from home? I have a CCA and am looking to advance. And recommendations on companies?

valentine2 in salt lake city, Utah

55 months ago

kristy in Clearfield, Pennsylvania said: Do you have any suggestions on how to get started coding from home? I have a CCA and am looking to advance. And recommendations on companies?

Most remote employers only hire coders with at least 3-5 years experience, so if you don't have that, then your chances of getting a home job are pretty slim. if you don't have experience, your best bet is to get experience in an office and then look for home coding.

There are a lot of coding companies, just google remote coding companies

undecided hawaii in Pompano Beach, Florida

55 months ago

hello to all

i am in the middle of ahima cca and everyday i learn something different re this carreer - i am middle aged and have been a clerical worker in the past for some time have an ultrasound AS which had its problems now trying for the last time this
ANYONE AM I DELUSIONAL TO BELIEVE ILL ACTUALLY GET A JOB?

medical coder123 in Massachusetts

55 months ago

Hi,

I am thinking about looking into remote coding. I have an RHIT credential I work in a hospital. I have approximately 7 years of ancillary outpatient coding experience and 3 years of Emergency Department coding experience so far. Our hospital is now responsible for assigning the E/M levels for the facility, of which I have 1.5 years of experience.

Is there any job security with remote coding? I am not familiar with this area of coding. It seems like much of it is going to be outsourced to India? yikes.

I would appreciate any stories of experience from others or recomendations of places that my be looking for what I have to offer.

Thanks so much!

valentine2 in salt lake city, Utah

55 months ago

medical coder123 in Massachusetts said: Hi,

I am thinking about looking into remote coding. I have an RHIT credential I work in a hospital. I have approximately 7 years of ancillary outpatient coding experience and 3 years of Emergency Department coding experience so far. Our hospital is now responsible for assigning the E/M levels for the facility, of which I have 1.5 years of experience.

Is there any job security with remote coding? I am not familiar with this area of coding. It seems like much of it is going to be outsourced to India? yikes.

I would appreciate any stories of experience from others or recomendations of places that my be looking for what I have to offer.

Thanks so much!

i work part time doing contract remote coding, but I also have a full time coding job because I need the security of a job and benefits. but many people work only remote and do quite well. besides, if your company did outsource, you usually know beforehand and can find a new company.

CoderToo in Hamilton, Ohio

54 months ago

The medical records and coding profession in general is going thru an enormous change right now in the work place. It is primarily driven by the EMR and how this is going to be implementated. If you are really looking to increase your worth and stability in the work place in this arena, I would suggest that you invest in college IT courses, not HIM courses, as IT is the true future of HIM. The paper based patient file will be gone, there will be no need for file clerks and even release of information software is out there that could completely make this an automated function too eliminating ROI clerks. As for coding, it has always been difficult to break into and once in, it does not guarantee a great job or work environment. I have met some department coding managers that are absolutely the worst, back stabbing, slave driving people to work for. Productivity and near impossible accuracy rates hang over a coders head daily. It can be an enormously stresssful and cliquish environment. That being said I have worked with automated coding software programs that are very accurate, but, a coder needs to be there to watch and pick up what the computer misses. So yes, less coders will be needed. As to outsourcing coding yes, this is a reality, as in India they work for mere pennies, and sad to say they are very accurate coders, who are just work driven due to living in bad conditions. We can not compete with them, just ask the Medical Transcriptionists, and the thousands of jobs loss to outsourcing. I agree with the other posts, invest in yourself, jobs are constantly changing and moving. And, also, regarding nursing, there really is not a nursing shortage, just alot of nurses that refuse to work in bad conditions where they are not respected. In the area I live in new nursing grads can not get jobs as due to the economy all the experienced nurses are not leaving their jobs and those with experience will get hired over the inexperienced.

Sulamith in Centerville, Texas

54 months ago

To: CoderToo You are so right about the back stabbing, productivity and accuracy rates. I had a remote coding job for 5 years and I got so burned out. I was wondering if you would be willing to email me. I have not worked in 3 years (my choice) and am thinking about getting back into coding and have some questions regarding the future of coding. I am in a small town and there are no coding networks here. Thanks. My email: sleeping_angel_1@hotmail.com

J. Van Noy in Dallas, Texas

54 months ago

Well said....

J. Van Noy in Dallas, Texas

54 months ago

Well stated...

CoderToo in Hamilton, Ohio

54 months ago

J. Van Noy in Dallas, Texas said: Well said....

Thank J. Van Noy. Just telling it like it is. Everyone thinks coding is this wonderful, high paying, great job. Most coders I know including myself are slaves to their desks and chairs, in order to work faster to get that bill dropped all with accuracy rates nearing 98%! When I first began years ago as a coder I enjoyed my job very much, I learned alot, interacted with doctors who had the time to discuss codes and procedures with you and you even got to have a nice work environment and chat with your co-workers. Sadly, gone are those days, as both computers and supervisors now constantly monitor your productivity and in staff meetings everyone learns about others errors in front of each other, used as a "group learning thing". I just say whatever happened to your personal productivity being discussed behind closed doors with your supervisor. It is very sad when your co-workers are being put down and you see them in tears! This only leads to decreased productivity as workers are made to compete against each other when error rates are this openly discussed. Everyone has different coding strengths and sometimes it becomes like a school environment as people are viewed as favorites. When you see multiple coding openings that go unfilled week after week on the job sites, there are real reasons why these positions go unfilled. It is the work environment and mean spirited management who delights in demeaning their workers. Quite possibly this is why everyone wants to code remotely anymore besides the convenience of staying at home. Just to get away from the viciousness of people.

Jennifer in Decatur, Mississippi

54 months ago

Ditto. The old days are gone.

NC in Seattle, Washington

54 months ago

CoderToo in Hamilton, Ohio said: Thank J. Van Noy. Just telling it like it is. Everyone thinks coding is this wonderful, high paying, great job. Most coders I know including myself are slaves to their desks and chairs, in order to work faster to get that bill dropped all with accuracy rates nearing 98%! When I first began years ago as a coder I enjoyed my job very much, I learned alot, interacted with doctors who had the time to discuss codes and procedures with you and you even got to have a nice work environment and chat with your co-workers. Sadly, gone are those days, as both computers and supervisors now constantly monitor your productivity and in staff meetings everyone learns about others errors in front of each other, used as a "group learning thing". I just say whatever happened to your personal productivity being discussed behind closed doors with your supervisor. It is very sad when your co-workers are being put down and you see them in tears! This only leads to decreased productivity as workers are made to compete against each other when error rates are this openly discussed. Everyone has different coding strengths and sometimes it becomes like a school environment as people are viewed as favorites. When you see multiple coding openings that go unfilled week after week on the job sites, there are real reasons why these positions go unfilled. It is the work environment and mean spirited management who delights in demeaning their workers. Quite possibly this is why everyone wants to code remotely anymore besides the convenience of staying at home. Just to get away from the viciousness of people.

How many years of experience do you need to have in order to do remote coding? Honey, I'm just getting started on this. Now you guys are starting to scare me and now I'm wondering if this was the right decision for me!

CoderToo in Hamilton, Ohio

54 months ago

NC in Seattle, Washington said: How many years of experience do you need to have in order to do remote coding? Honey, I'm just getting started on this. Now you guys are starting to scare me and now I'm wondering if this was the right decision for me!

Anything medical is a tough field to be in. I don't care if you are a coder, nurse, resp. therapist, etc. I have been in the field for 28 years. I didn't mean to scare you or anyone but, what I am saying is the truth. It can be tough, it is not the field to be in it you have a thin skin, can't take being yelled at or can't defend yourself regarding how you coded a chart. I have worked at many hospitals as a coding consultant and the demands are for accuracy and to get that chart coded and bill dropped ASAP! Productivity rates are always monitored, and you are usually told how many charts are expected per hour that you will code. If you can't keep up you will eventually hear about it. That is one of the real reasons why they do not hire new inexperienced coders, time is money as the saying goes. And, new coders make an unbelievable amount of mistakes that results in loosing millions in lost revenue. It is just too risky to hire newbies. One place that I worked expected outpatient coders to a least code 200 encounters a day, and I know some were pressured so much about it that they either resigned or were fired. It is what it is, productivity and coding go hand in hand, it never used to be so stressful, but now with Medicare monies being cut, every dime counts and they want to make sure the right code is on the bill so that all monies are generated and no re submissions or reworking needs to be done. That is how money is lost, as after awhile if you can not get to the re-work the clock is ticking, and eventually you just have missed the time allowment to submit the claim, which is bad news for the hospital and eventually for the coder who coded it wrong in the first place.

Sulamith in Centerville, Texas

54 months ago

I worked for nine years as a biller/insurance follow-up rep.at San Antonio Community Hospital in Upland, Ca. I enrolled in the Coding Specialist Certificate program at Loma Linda University in 1997. I thought the teachers were fantastic. In July 1999 I was selected to serve a coding internship. This meant acutal hands-on coding of "real patient" charts. I think I read that nowadays hands-on coding is included in the class. I completed the LLU class and hoped to transfer to the coding dept. of SACH. I had a interview with the Coding Manager at my hospital and did not get a job. I could not understand why I did not. A co-worker that was an insurance biller was in my class at LLU and she also interviewed for a coding job at our hospital and also did not get a job as a coder.(A few years later she finally got a job in the coding dept.) I quit the hospital I had worked at for nine years and got a job at another hospital. It was there that I was asked to train two new coders. I found out that THEY had been hired at my previous hospital and were moonlighting as coders at my new hospital! What a slap in the face it was to me! I had worked at that hospital for nine years and they hired "outsiders"! I took the CCS right out of school and passed. I worked on-site at hospitals for two years before I got a remote coder job. I worked at that job for five years and quit.Yes, you have to have a thick skin to work as a coder. I have taken a three year break and am thinking about coding again but the company I used to work for PHNS has been bought out by a company that seems to be based in India...I think alot of coding jobs have been outsourced.

CoderToo in Hamilton, Ohio

54 months ago

Sorry to hear about what has happened in the past to you Sulamith but, you validate what I have been saying in my other posts. The HIM departments in hospitals can be very cliquish and often managers socialize with other managers from other hospitals so they discuss their co-workers often. They can make it almost impossible to take another position, leave an unhappy one and keep you from promotional or hospital departmental transfers. So many people are stuck where they are at due to this politics. Many of the HIM directors I know have been in their positions for 25-30+ years and there is literally no one they do not have contact with regarding who are the new up and coming grads with potential and those who probably you do not want to hire. It starts in college and how bright you are and if the instructors like you. I know of an instructor who pulled strings to get a excellent student with absolutely no experience get her first coding job. This happened because they had established a strong friendship, she was a favorite star pupil. Does this occur in other professions? Sure, and it is very evident in HIM that it is not what you know but who you know! Some one at SACH did not want to see you advance and leave your billing job more than likely and they prevented it for some reason, and you will probably never ever find out who it was. That is how it always goes, someone you think is your friend turns out to be your enemy. You see this often in hospitals, the nurse aide that goes to nursing school, graduates becomes an RN and the hospital that she has worked as an aide for years does not hire her even though they have tons of openings and she has been a sterling employee. People in power sometimes just hate to see people advance. It is a character flaw they have, or maybe they feel threatened somehow that now you are on equal footing with them and they don't like it. Many people have to leave to go to other places to start all over again after changing careers.

medical coder123 in Massachusetts

54 months ago

I agree. We are made to code, code code! It is very stressful.
I am at my desk constantly except for lunch or a quick chat with a co worker. Wth the economy the way it is they want every bill out asap.

Clover

54 months ago

To CoderInHeaven

I read your post and I find this to be true but that is why there are lawyers, OSHA, and other people that can help to stop this abuse because that is what it is. I would not tolerate abuse from Senior Coders. I would report them and I would take them to court. That is what I will do if I don't get a job because that is discrimination. So it depends on if you will tolerate it or not. I would not! There are new coders that have worked at home,clinic,at physician's office but it seems some of these senior coders are trying to black ball people and they need to be take to court!!!!!!!!!!!

Clover

54 months ago

I think it would help if you that are working would help with job leads for the new coders instead of being selfish and hoarding all the jobs! Remember you had help getting your job and some of you didn't go to school! To those experienced coders that are helpful, thanks for being that way!

helenofcoding in Murrieta, California

54 months ago

Clover said: I think it would help if you that are working would help with job leads for the new coders instead of being selfish and hoarding all the jobs! Remember you had help getting your job and some of you didn't go to school! To those experienced coders that are helpful, thanks for being that way!

I can appreciate your frustration HOWEVER once ICD-10 goes into effect NO ONE will have "3 Years Experience" as everyone will be beginners! Many older coders will leave the field instead of going through the "transition". That means more opportunities! Also due to the enourmous detail in ICD-10 a strong Human Anatomy skill set will be an asset! My friend who is an RHIA and HIM Director of 30 years explained to me that when it comes to hiring coders when ICD-10 hits she will take a good long look at the resumes and the ones she will be interested in will be those who graduated from top notch coding programs (i.e. AHIMA), those who attended Boot Camps and Training for ICD-10 and who also "brushed up" on Anatomy/Physiology. So ladies...don't get mad and call a lawyer instead prepare yourself as much as possible so when ICD-10 hits you can give your competition a good run for their money. Life is not fair and yes hospitals are full of politics BUT October 1, 2013 will be here before we know it and those who you feel "stood in your way"...may just be getting "out of your way." In other words....don't get mad...GET READY to meet them on what will be a level playing field...don't give up hope....there is always room for the best!

Shawn in Jacksonville, Florida

54 months ago

HelenofCoding, I am with Clover with this one because I am a student. I don't think it is right for you to say wait until 2013. No I am with her, I will get a lawyer and take the school to court! I don't think she is mad. She is speaking up for herself which is more than what most people do. I don't believe in getting mad, I believe in letting the bullies in this field to stop hoarding and trying to block new students from getting a job because the ones that did not get formal training are scared someone will take their jobs! That is what it's all about! I disagree with you Helen. I don't get ready because you say it! I am ready!

CoderToo in Hamilton, Ohio

54 months ago

According to my recent emails from the AHIMA, ALL coders are expected to have ICD-10 CEU's in order to renew their credential. RHIa/RHIT's will have to log 6 and CCS's will have to have 16 I believe. So, if you want to continiue to work literally everyone will have to prove that they have had the classes. Yes, everyone will be on a level playing field. But, people who have proven to have worked as a coder continuously and have the experience will continue to get the jobs. I have seen ICD-10, AHIMA says that a competent coder can learn the system in a 1 day seminar! I don't buy it, as most coders just know the codes (ICD-9) and have them memorized from years of working. ICD-10 is more specific and complicated and if you do not have a good A&P, Pathophy background you will not do very well. While I do believe that some coders will retire, I do not believe you will see the mass exodus of older and experienced coders simply do the economy. I know alot of coders who are in their 40-50's who have absolutely no intention of leaving because of ICD-10. They are taking a "we will see" stance, see if productivity rates are the same or if they will go down, what insurance companies expect etc. It is an interesting time for coders or anyone in medical records. The EMR will eliminate jobs, file clerks, ROI and chart assembly techs. And, outsourcing of coders to India continues at a rapid rate and to computerized charge capturing software. Yes, this exists, let's not denie ourselves about this! There is software already out there where codes are picked up whenever a MD speaks or dictates any medical note and it is accurate, and software where MD's scroll down and simply pick a code themselves. For some reason hospital administrators feel that MD's are good coders and try to tell them any differently! They feel that they know best, not the coders. So the jobs are not locked in and they never were, just like any profession.

helenofcoding in Murrieta, California

54 months ago

Shawn in Jacksonville, Florida said: HelenofCoding, I am with Clover with this one because I am a student. I don't think it is right for you to say wait until 2013. No I am with her, I will get a lawyer and take the school to court! I don't think she is mad. She is speaking up for herself which is more than what most people do. I don't believe in getting mad, I believe in letting the bullies in this field to stop hoarding and trying to block new students from getting a job because the ones that did not get formal training are scared someone will take their jobs! That is what it's all about! I disagree with you Helen. I don't get ready because you say it! I am ready!

I know it is tough out there...I was merely trying to point out that changes are on the horizon and until someone gives you the opportunity to prove yourself continue to work on your skill set to meet the future changes. I did not mean to infer that you should wait to get a job. To the contrary, there are various avenues you can take. I do not know which school you attended and what you were promised but I do agree it is difficult for people to break into coding and recruiters for these coding schools need to be more upfront about this. It is disheartening to work hard towards a goal and then feel like opportunity is being kept away. These are tough times and those who have coding jobs are going to do all they can to protect their own interests (hospital politics) which unfortunately means that those that need an opportunity have a frustrating journey.

valentine2 in salt lake city, Utah

54 months ago

Shawn in Jacksonville, Florida said: I will get a lawyer and take the school to court!

I am pretty sure this is one of the dumbest things I have ever read.

CoderToo in Hamilton, Ohio

54 months ago

Geez, good luck to everyone who works in the coding profession! You have all just proven what I have been saying, that the coding environment is full of stress, favortism and managerial politics. The good coders will always pass the pre-employment coding tests, and ultimately get the job, the rest, will fail. That is how it has been since 1994 when I graduated college with my degree in HIM. The hiring managers will always have a preferred type of person that they are looking for, experience is just one part of it. What is working behind the scenes is that coding is the financial backbone of a hospital. Those codes are worth millions of dollars that an experienced coder assigns to a chart. One mistake can cost a hospital a lot of money! It is very risky business to hire people who do not know what they are doing! This is in every type of work! To be honest with you if a very inexperienced coder was hired at most of the hospitals I know the productivity of all the other coders would go down as they would be inundated with sooooo many questions from the newbie that it would drive the rest of them nuts! And, sorry, to say that when the supervisor audited their coding (as all coders get audited) the mistakes would be found, and more than likely they would be fired! I do not have the answer for the newbie, except to maybe break into a medical practice where things are not so tuff and demanding. Begin as a biller possibly or file clerk .

J. Van Noy in Dallas, Texas

54 months ago

While all comments are expressions of personal opinions, I have to say the last few seemed to border on the negativity. I can understand the frustration the newly certified coders out there are experiencing. I do have to admit that as a manager I am always looking for experienced CPC, but you can sometimes find a shiny apple in a bunch. As one respondent posted, start in billing or as a file clerk, work your way up. I have two persons who are potential candidates for future positions at the company where I manage the coding department. While I do not have the budget nor the space to hire both, I have begun to train them on easier charts to code. They are both newly certified coder-Apprentices. Their work is audited before going to billing, they are educated on their mistakes. I do not expect them to know everything about coding as that is not their primary job. They are extremely grateful for the small amount of coding/training they get to help them utilize their coding skills. It is called mentoring. We do not have enough companies willing to mentor new coders. If you know someone or can mentor you should do that for the coming year. It would make a lot of new coders happy.

helenofcoding in Murrieta, California

54 months ago

J. Van Noy in Dallas, Texas said: While all comments are expressions of personal opinions, I have to say the last few seemed to border on the negativity. I can understand the frustration the newly certified coders out there are experiencing. I do have to admit that as a manager I am always looking for experienced CPC, but you can sometimes find a shiny apple in a bunch. As one respondent posted, start in billing or as a file clerk, work your way up. I have two persons who are potential candidates for future positions at the company where I manage the coding department. While I do not have the budget nor the space to hire both, I have begun to train them on easier charts to code. They are both newly certified coder-Apprentices. Their work is audited before going to billing, they are educated on their mistakes. I do not expect them to know everything about coding as that is not their primary job. They are extremely grateful for the small amount of coding/training they get to help them utilize their coding skills. It is called mentoring. We do not have enough companies willing to mentor new coders. If you know someone or can mentor you should do that for the coming year. It would make a lot of new coders happy.

Thank you for your post. The two gals you are training are very fortunate to have someone like you to help them get some hands on training. Mentoring is so important and I applaud your willingness to mentor those two gals. You are making a difference in their lives and I say God Bless You for it.

CoderToo in Hamilton, Ohio

54 months ago

I am not trying to be negative, just giving you my honest opinion of the work environment. In the area in which I work there are several coding positions that are always open, there are some at hospitals and some in insurance companies. I have noticed most recently that it appears that the hospitals are attempting to draw the very seasoned coder away from their current employment, by increasing the current experience required. They are now asking for 3-5 years of "current inpatient experience" in addition to being RHIA/RHIT/CCS credentialed. Some are even asking that in addition to having inpatient experience, they now want POA, outpatient, same day surgery, E&M, and multi-physician practice coding, too. How a candidate can have all of this is beyond me and still have the 3-5 years current inpatient, too! Also, the pre-employment coding tests are getting more complex and hard. What I am trying to say here is that it is almost impossible to meet the qualification that the hiring managers want! Alot of coders I know (and I know alot) are just going to consultant work, where they make top dollar and do not have to deal with the stress and politics of hospitals. And, again, it is who you know, as networking in this field is necessary for doors to open. A good coder is the same as gold to a hospital and will become more so in the future with ICD-10. But, that being said, what I stated above, with the demands of the position even on the very experienced, I don't really know where the inexperienced goes. Most experienced coders themselves struggle daily just to keep up with coding changes and maintaining productivity. It would be impossible for the inexperienced to keep up in a fast paced department, where you hit the ground coding immediately when you arrive at work, and don't stop until it is time to go home literally. I can't tell you how tuff and demanding it is. Consulting work is even more tuff, as the hospital is paying you top dollar!

valentine2 in salt lake city, Utah

54 months ago

Shawn in Longwood, Florida said: I hope you get laid off and never find a job!

Thank you for your kind wishes, but I assure you, I will always have a job.

valentine2 in salt lake city, Utah

54 months ago

@CoderToo- Wow, mary is CRAZY! LOL

helenofcoding in Murrieta, California

54 months ago

I wanted to post what I hope will be helpful information for people who participate in this forum. I have heard that VA Hospitals are willing to hire coding graduates with a CCA and are also willing to train them. The VA will sometimes have free standing clinics in certain cities so you may want to google those in whatever area you live in.

leh7335 in Portland, Oregon

54 months ago

Mary in Phoenix, Arizona said: That's because the people working in the specialties you listed are highly trained, skilled professionals. There's a world of difference between caring for a patient and pecking at a keyboard. A trained monkey could do your job. In fact, with all the outsourcing, that is exactly what's happening to coding!

All outsourcing is for profit, even radiology review is sneaking over. I, an MT for 11 years, refuse to work in the hospital setting for exactly this attitude: Who has value and who does not. If you listened to what I hear, over one hour, you'd thank god a monkey was not working on YOUR chart....Honestly, what I do, helps you do what you do. Please don't ever forget that.

Page:  « Previous   1  2  3  4  5  Next »   Last »

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.