Working in a large hotel vs a small hotel

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joe noname in Vancouver, Washington

59 months ago

i work at a 74-room hotel, and i have to do the auditing, deal with guests, deliver receipts, newspapers, set up the breakfast area, and make min wage (8.40/hr), bleh

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GiniSwabb in Houston, Texas

59 months ago

joe noname in Vancouver, Washington said: i work at a 74-room hotel, and i have to do the auditing, deal with guests, deliver receipts, newspapers, set up the breakfast area, and make min wage (8.40/hr), bleh

I say move to a bigger hotel! you still have to do all the paperwork but you dont have to make breakfast!!

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Martha Morejon in Orlando, Florida

56 months ago

Steve in Memphis, Tennessee said: I am currently the night auditor at a 100 room hotel and am the only employee in the hotel for a majority of my shift. At larger hotels does the auditor have to perform as many front desk duties (dealing with the guests) as auditors at small hotels do?

I am looking to change properties and am curious what larger hotels are like.

It is beautiful. You not have to deal with the hotel's guest. Also, the Auditor's department are located in the Accounting Office. I

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troupex in Essen, Germany

55 months ago

hey all
I am a new night auditor in 110 romms I am the only person on my shift I have to combine during my shift between doing all the paperwork day reports ..ect deal with geust cleaning the front office some times I could get more tasks thants normal because it dependes on how many guests we have in the hotel or how many ceremonies and conference we will have in the next day anyway in my opnion thats not a very hard work for some one who should do that druning a day shift but it could be some times hard for some one who doing that during the night shift cause of the body condition anyway my question is for the night auditors with a experiance in this job

is there any health hazards doing this job working 5 night in every week and some times 11 nights in one time ?
if yes please would you tell me which hatards and how to avoide them ?
I am saying that because it s kind of hard to adapt your body on this timing work thank you all night auditors

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chewy in Boise, Idaho

55 months ago

i work audit in a 303 rm hotel with about 500 employees. believe me you do deal with the same issues as a smaller hotel. however, be careful. because of the ressession, i am now having to do partial fd manager duties, some of payroll and accnts receivable because they are laying off 2 positions in accounting. (there are only 5 people who work in accounting) and guess what, no raise! they arnt even going to personally train me. yay. i can tell you from experience it was better at a smaller hotel.

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chewy in Boise, Idaho

55 months ago

as far as schedules go, go to sleep right when you get home. youll be up about 3pm and youll still have a day left. the only hazards are you may become depressed from the lack of sunlight, its harder to maintain relationships with your friends because of the weird hours, and of course there are the guests who are harder to deal with because they are drunk/tired/cranky about flights/homeless/crackheads/exhibitionists/just a** holes,ect....which usually isn't the case during the day. oh and extra hazardous if youre a woman. men (and the occasional female) will try to be a little too friendly and will not take no for an answer which is very disracting and/or dangerous. also that is the perfect time for a hotel to get robbed. just saying, ive had personal experience with all ive just said. its hazardous, but an easy job sometimes. you set your own pace an you have to be quick thinking. youll never have a dull night as long as you have guests inhouse.

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sparklegirl in Stevensville, Montana

55 months ago

Wow... here I am taking a hospitality course for my associates degree and hearing about the wonderful life of a fd clerk sounds like I picked the wrong career. I did really wonder about joe Q. public. My big question is.. what do you do when someone wants to make a reservation and you just can't understand them (thick accent, drunk, etc). What is protocol at that point?

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Natasha in Memphis, Tennessee

54 months ago

sparklegirl in Stevensville, Montana said: Wow... here I am taking a hospitality course for my associates degree and hearing about the wonderful life of a fd clerk sounds like I picked the wrong career. I did really wonder about joe Q. public. My big question is.. what do you do when someone wants to make a reservation and you just can't understand them (thick accent, drunk, etc). What is protocol at that point?

if drunk, you just hang up. If not, pretend that you are having phone difficulties, and hang up mid sentence (your sentence). Or just tell them to call back whenever you are not working.

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Natasha in Memphis, Tennessee

54 months ago

I work at a 125 rm hotel in Chicago as a night auditor. I am the only employee on site the whole night, so I do the FD duties, deal with maintenance issues (not resolving, just accepting them), deal with any a8holes that decide to be a*holes.

The pros of my job: I have no bosses to watch over me, I can do whatever I want, I can take as many breaks as I want, I can say whatever I want, there are not many people to bug me at night, its peaceful, I can work on my hobbies, the pay is almost 12/hr.

cons: I'm alone, so I have no one to rely on but myself; I have to deliver newspapers/receipts, while tending to the FD; we are located between the woods and a highways, so...; night is when all the freaks come out.

Its not a job for everyone, and I would not recommend it if you are easily offended, scared, intimidated, or bored.

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nightauditdude in Nanaimo, British Columbia

54 months ago

Night Audit SUX THE BIG ONE!

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animal medler in Sacramento, California

53 months ago

oh my god i could write a best selling novel on the things that have happened to me at night-and this is upscale hotel on way to south lake tahoe-farthur up the mountain the more freaking freaks there seem to be-people leaving drugs in room(several times) overbearing drunk males-who think because you work 11pm to 7am that you want to come up to their room-idiots- i do get paid well 13.50 PER HR-also i do ALL my laundry there.

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beanervision in Bend, Oregon

46 months ago

Boy are you ever spot on about the drunks on the weekend and the dogs barking all night. I have done audit for 7 years now and the first night back is the pits. It does wear you out but on the plus side you are in demand getting another job because the smart ppeople do not want thses hours.

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laly in Miami, Florida

46 months ago

Martha Morejon in Orlando, Florida said: It is beautiful. You not have to deal with the hotel's guest. Also, the Auditor's department are located in the Accounting Office. I

Sorry, but it depends on the hotel. In south beach, FL. the boutique hotel between 27 or 40 rooms the night auditor performs "all duties" such as: check in/out guest, answer phone and make reaservations and the like; in other words, same duties as front desk + night audit. Salary $12 up.

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kathy in Mont-tremblant, Quebec

45 months ago

I am a night auditor in for a 70 room hotel and I am going through what they call a dismal in disguise I need some information if anybody knows. Is it compulsory to have someone on duty at night?

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MAIN MAN in New Orleans, Louisiana

40 months ago

Natasha in Memphis, Tennessee said: if drunk, you just hang up. If not, pretend that you are having phone difficulties, and hang up mid sentence (your sentence). Or just tell them to call back whenever you are not working.

I JUST MAKE UP A NEW LANGUAGE THAT THEY CANNOT UNDERSTAND UNTIL THEY HANG UP!!!!

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melody in Rumney, New Hampshire

36 months ago

anyone in nh looking for a night auditor position at a small hotel? i have 40 hours available in a 57 room hotel. emial me if interested

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REVEREND-BLACK in Mesa, Arizona

33 months ago

sparklegirl in Stevensville, Montana said: Wow... here I am taking a hospitality course for my associates degree and hearing about the wonderful life of a fd clerk sounds like I picked the wrong career. I did really wonder about joe Q. public. My big question is.. what do you do when someone wants to make a reservation and you just can't understand them (thick accent, drunk, etc). What is protocol at that point?

yes I agree with you I started my school the same time a got a job in a 107 room hotel and let me tell you what I think im going to school in vain I hate this job a crap load of work for little or no pay heck I have not made this amount of money sense the 90s. doing the audit is no big deal its all automated for me other than sorting all the paperwork out its a brainless job. then you have to clean the place as well as set up all the meeting rooms deliver the departing folios and new papers then set up and prepare breakfast for the same money as the day crew. in my opinion its a bunch of crap! I should be getting paid more for doing all this extra crap.damn economy anyway grrrr. when Im done im getting a bachelor in mortuary science and im going to open my own funeral home and centenary theres the money right there man. I currently own a human remains removal business and the money I have made doing this is freakin crazy but the down fall is the stinky smell dead people you have to pick up thats why I;m in school in the first place, to get out of this but it seems to me this is what im good at so I should continue the education in this field.

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NightOwl in Seymour, Tennessee

29 months ago

I work in a small hotel in pigeon forge TN. 53 rooms. I'm responsible for doing the normal night audit paperwork as well as answer phone/make reservations, attend to guest problems, etc. It's probably the best job ever because I rarely even see any guests after 2:00 (that's only when we're busy) and I get all of my paperwork done in about 10 minutes. I do have to help set up the breakfast during the slow season though. The rest of my time is spent surfing the web, listening to music, watching movies, playing video games, and getting all of my homework done. I'm actually working as I type this. It's rad. The only downside is that I only make $8 an hour with no hope for a raise. After reading some of the previous posts I can see that it's pretty low for a night auditor. I'll probably try to find a new night auditing job with a different company sometime soon. Can't really complain though.

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Jpolley in Phoenix, Arizona

24 months ago

chewy in Boise, Idaho said: as far as schedules go, go to sleep right when you get home. youll be up about 3pm and youll still have a day left. the only hazards are you may become depressed from the lack of sunlight, its harder to maintain relationships with your friends because of the weird hours, and of course there are the guests who are harder to deal with because they are drunk/tired/cranky about flights/homeless/crackheads/exhibitionists/just a** holes,ect....which usually isn't the case during the day. oh and extra hazardous if youre a woman. men (and the occasional female) will try to be a little too friendly and will not take no for an answer which is very disracting and/or dangerous. also that is the perfect time for a hotel to get robbed. just saying, ive had personal experience with all ive just said. its hazardous, but an easy job sometimes. you set your own pace an you have to be quick thinking. youll never have a dull night as long as you have guests inhouse.

I disagree with the "no dull nights" part. I work in a motel right off the freeway and there are some nights where I will have nobody come in or maybe one every three hours. We normally have about 50 guests in house, most being truckers. Saturdays are the weird nights; drunks and what have you. Although, I have made friends with some of the people that basically live here. I would have to say they are "entertainers" in one way or another.

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Mark in Shreveport, Louisiana

24 months ago

I work in a crummy hotel doing the night audit. I really would like to know what night audit usually gets paid. I get $8.50 an hour and two of my other day time FD coworkers get 9+ an hour. I work 6 days a week and I only get straight pay. What I would also like to know is if it is accepted to call other hotels and get their rate and occupancy? My boss is wanting me to call about 25 hotels every night and get their Rate and Occupancy.

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bigdog in Mesa, Arizona

24 months ago

Mark in Shreveport, Louisiana said: I work in a crummy hotel doing the night audit. I really would like to know what night audit usually gets paid. I get $8.50 an hour and two of my other day time FD coworkers get 9+ an hour. I work 6 days a week and I only get straight pay. What I would also like to know is if it is accepted to call other hotels and get their rate and occupancy? My boss is wanting me to call about 25 hotels every night and get their Rate and Occupancy.

there should be a shift diff they make 9 you should make 9.50 that's normal. but that varies from hotel to hotel

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Westgate in Little Valley, New York

23 months ago

I get paid 9.00 per hour to work nights 5 days a week. I do audit and accounting plus whatever other jobs they throw at me is this fair pay?

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J-dog in Phoenix, Arizona

23 months ago

Westgate in Little Valley, New York said: I get paid 9.00 per hour to work nights 5 days a week. I do audit and accounting plus whatever other jobs they throw at me is this fair pay?

That's more than I get paid to do the same thing.

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cnealmaher in Oakland, California

22 months ago

melody in Rumney, New Hampshire said: anyone in nh looking for a night auditor position at a small hotel ? i have 40 hours available in a 57 room hotel. emial me if interested

I wouldn't mind being a night auditor. I've taken Accounting in High School and did two semester of Accounting courses.

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cr1992 in Los Angeles, California

15 months ago

Hello fellow auditors! Question... I audit at a 148 room hotel in California. The hotel management tells me that I am to take an unpaid 30 min lunch. The thing is when I clock out it should be uninterrupted, unpaid time right? But I am the only one here other than the one maintenance man. So when something happens (walk in, phone,..)I have to help them. This interrupts my break time. Should I be getting paid for this??? I have called many other hotels in the area and no other auditor has to clock out. What should I do? thanks!

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maillemanjoe in Omaha, Nebraska

14 months ago

cr1992,

Look at US Department of Labor Laws regarding Breaks (29 CFR 785.18) and Meal Periods (29 CFR 785.19). I will summarize as best I can for you what they say, but you can find these on the Internet as well. Federal law does not require lunch or coffee breaks. However, when employers do offer short breaks (usually lasting about 5 to 20 minutes), federal law considers the breaks as compensable work hours that would be included in the sum of hours worked during the work week and considered in determining if overtime was worked. Bona fide meal periods (typically lasting at least 30 minutes), serve a different purpose than coffee or snack breaks and, thus, are not work time and are not compensable.

You aren't entitled to be paid for time off if you don't have to work while eating. If you do have to work while eating -- for example, by answering phones or waiting for a delivery while eating lunch -- then you have the right to be paid for that time. If you aren't allowed to take legally required breaks, or you're required to work through your breaks without getting paid, contact your state labor department.

My suggestion is bring up any times you were unable to enjoy lunch without interruption with management. If you are engaged to be waiting to work while taking lunch, then you aren't "really" at lunch if you are always interrupted. The best way to deal with this issue is ask the management their priority for you as a worker...do they want you as an employee to instruct others to respect your lunch by waiting or coming back at a certain time OR do they want to pay you for lunch missed. Or do they want to be in violation of labor law. Ask them if all staff are missing lunch like you are expected to...that may be bargaining chip.

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Julian in Barcelona, Spain

12 months ago

Hi everybody,

As far as I'm concerned I really prefer working in big structure. I made an internship last year in the U.S.A ( NY). I worked for a 5 star hotel ( really big hotel) and did great things!
I asked a company to help me to find a good paid internship, the name is Placement International.
you can easily find them on the net.
the company offers internships all over the world and all internships are paid ( I guess min 1750 per month)

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ThatIsNotMyName in Nashville, Tennessee

12 months ago

cr1992 in Los Angeles, California said: Hello fellow auditors! Question... I audit at a 148 room hotel in California. The hotel management tells me that I am to take an unpaid 30 min lunch. The thing is when I clock out it should be uninterrupted, unpaid time right? But I am the only one here other than the one maintenance man. So when something happens (walk in, phone,..)I have to help them. This interrupts my break time. Should I be getting paid for this??? I have called many other hotels in the area and no other auditor has to clock out. What should I do? thanks!

Hotel clerks aren't covered by break laws because of the nature of the job. Some jobs are like that.

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ThatIsNotMyName in Nashville, Tennessee

12 months ago

I should add that you DO have to be paid. Sorry, I missed that part of your post somehow. Maillemanjoe is correct.

Because of the nature of the hotel clerk job, you are not entitled to a break to clock out. BUT they DO have to pay you for your time. So you shouldn't even be clocking out. If your boss's want it unpaid, then you are entitled to not have to do a d*mn thing at work until you clock back in. What they are asking is illegal. When I worked at a hotel, I simply just ate whenever I had a chance. I never clocked out for breaks, it was a straight 8 hour shift.

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ThatIsNotMyName in Nashville, Tennessee

12 months ago

So, it's going to be one of either of these if it's going to be legal:

You clock in for your 8 hour shift. You eat your lunch whenever you can, and if guests interrupt your meal, you get up and help them, and then go back to your meal. You clock out at at the end of your shift, and this is the only time you clock out. You are paid for your whole time there and you eat anytime you can or want.

^^^ This is what most hotels do.

OR

You clock in for your 8 hour shift. Your boss has made a mandatory lunch "break" part of the job, so you are told to clock out for 30 minutes. During this 30 minutes, you are not required to work, you don't help guests, you aren't interrupted. You can leave the premises if you even want. You don't work at all. Then at the end of 30 minutes, you clock back in and continue with your shift until you go home. (I have never heard of hotels doing this though myself.)

---

If your employer is asking you to clock out and help the desk during an unpaid lunch break, it's illegal. Contact the labor board.

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Daniel MC in San Francisco, California

11 months ago

how do you get a job at bigger name hotels & why is it so hard to get hired at the bigger name hotels when you already have experience working at so-so smaller hotels. I hate that...

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BeckonsAttore in West Chester, Pennsylvania

10 months ago

Generally, and traditionally, a large hotel is much more professional and highly regarded over a small hotel, from my personal observations thus far, however. Regardless, I would like to work for one of them <a href="www.travelodge.ca/hotels/view/travelodge-kamloops-mountview">hotels in Kamloops</a> any day.

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Gunther Richter in Miami Beach, Florida

10 months ago

ThatIsNotMyName in Nashville, Tennessee said: So, it's going to be one of either of these if it's going to be legal :

You clock in for your 8 hour shift. You eat your lunch whenever you can, and if guests interrupt your meal, you get up and help them, and then go back to your meal. You clock out at at the end of your shift, and this is the only time you clock out. You are paid for your whole time there and you eat anytime you can or want.

^^^ This is what most hotels do.

OR

You clock in for your 8 hour shift. Your boss has made a mandatory lunch "break" part of the job, so you are told to clock out for 30 minutes. During this 30 minutes, you are not required to work, you don't help guests, you aren't interrupted. You can leave the premises if you even want. You don't work at all. Then at the end of 30 minutes, you clock back in and continue with your shift until you go home. (I have never heard of hotels doing this though myself.)

---

If your employer is asking you to clock out and help the desk during an unpaid lunch break, it's illegal. Contact the labor board.

Wrong, you are not allowed to leave the premises during an unpaid lunch break. That is completely up to your employer's discretion. It's considered an 8 hour shift with a 30 minute unpaid break, not two 4 hour shifts. Depending on the state, they can fire you for it as well ( hire-at-will states like Florida )

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Cc cC in Boise, Idaho

5 months ago

Yes there are a few health hazards and not only that, but it's a known fact that people who work graveyards die at a younger age then the average person. This is the norm. It has something to do with the sun coming up, and your body dropping hormones, and your not using those hormones correctly when your asleep. Look it up. So, make sure you get your differential, that's why it's paid, they are paying for your lost years.

A lot of companies tend to allow the other workers to leave too much work for the night audit. It's actually very disrespectful treatment by the co-workers. Because you work nights, your energy levels are always going to lower then most peoples. I used to go in on swing, and bust out all the work, then on graveyards, I wouldn't want to do it at all.

Does your hotel ever have billing issues because the reservations are set up right? Go through every in house guest's reservation, each day get the new arrivals, and if you have time, look at the future reservations as well. Fix all the cc issues, address mistakes, routing mistakes, capitalizations...Set up the 3rd party reservations, advance purchase, group blocks...soon you will learn to stop the issues before they check in. Your name will be on every reservation. If there have been issues, the bosses will be relieved they are over. Become indispensible.

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Cc cC in Boise, Idaho

5 months ago

Start applying at Hilton brand hotels, like double tree, Hiltons, etc. Hiltons pay better, and want their front desk staff standing up front all the time. They do not understaff the hotels at all, so there are plenty of housekeepers for the laundry, houseboys/men who set up meeting rooms, 1-2 ladies making & serving breakfast. There's no cross training at all.
Hiltons hire off the street just like everyone else, but your experience and desire for audit will make you more desirable.

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Cc cC in Boise, Idaho

5 months ago

Hilton Brands. They seem intimidating, but they hire the people right off the street, just like the rest of the hotels. They pay better, & they don't cross train. They have enough staff for every department, and a department for every service.

Night audit gets a big differential, like at least $1.50+ a hour more then the other shifts.

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Cc cC in Boise, Idaho

5 months ago

chewy in Boise, Idaho said: as far as schedules go, go to sleep right when you get home. youll be up about 3pm and youll still have a day left. the only hazards are you may become depressed from the lack of sunlight, its harder to maintain relationships with your friends because of the weird hours, and of course there are the guests who are harder to deal with because they are drunk/tired/cranky about flights/homeless/crackheads/exhibitionists/just a** holes,ect....which usually isn't the case during the day. oh and extra hazardous if youre a woman. men (and the occasional female) will try to be a little too friendly and will not take no for an answer which is very disracting and/or dangerous. also that is the perfect time for a hotel to get robbed. just saying, ive had personal experience with all ive just said. its hazardous, but an easy job sometimes. you set your own pace an you have to be quick thinking. youll never have a dull night as long as you have guests inhouse.

You forgot about forming a relationship and not being able to sleep together. That is a big issue.

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Cc cC in Boise, Idaho

5 months ago

Gunther Richter in Miami Beach, Florida said: Wrong, you are not allowed to leave the premises during an unpaid lunch break. That is completely up to your employer's discretion. It's considered an 8 hour shift with a 30 minute unpaid break, not two 4 hour shifts. Depending on the state, they can fire you for it as well ( hire-at-will states like Florida )

Someone has to be there at all times, for no other reason but fire.

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Cc cC in Boise, Idaho

5 months ago

Natasha in Memphis, Tennessee said: if drunk, you just hang up. If not, pretend that you are having phone difficulties, and hang up mid sentence (your sentence). Or just tell them to call back whenever you are not working.

There is no way to know for certain that a person is drunk, and it's NEVER wise to hang up unless the person swears at you. Then you have your reason. The rest of the time, you do your job to everyone just the same. You may want to ask the guest to call back during the next shift's hours-you could say your phone is not working, your pcs are down? I have only had a couple of times where i couldn't understand a guest. If you are patient, listen carefully, and don't be thinking about other things at the same time, usually they can make the most important info understood. If not, doesn't your hotel have a central reservations that you can transfer them to?

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Cc cC in Boise, Idaho

5 months ago

sparklegirl in Stevensville, Montana said: Wow... here I am taking a hospitality course for my associates degree and hearing about the wonderful life of a fd clerk sounds like I picked the wrong career. I did really wonder about joe Q. public. My big question is.. what do you do when someone wants to make a reservation and you just can't understand them (thick accent, drunk, etc). What is protocol at that point?

If you want to work on cruise ships, you need a certain # of years as front desk hotels

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Cc cC in Boise, Idaho

5 months ago

kathy in Mont-tremblant, Quebec said: I am a night auditor in for a 70 room hotel and I am going through what they call a dismal in disguise I need some information if anybody knows. Is it compulsory to have someone on duty at night?

Absolutely. If the hotel catches on fire, who will notify the guests?

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Cc cC in Boise, Idaho

5 months ago

Mark in Shreveport, Louisiana said: I work in a crummy hotel doing the night audit . I really would like to know what night audit usually gets paid. I get $8.50 an hour and two of my other day time FD coworkers get 9+ an hour. I work 6 days a week and I only get straight pay. What I would also like to know is if it is accepted to call other hotels and get their rate and occupancy? My boss is wanting me to call about 25 hotels every night and get their Rate and Occupancy.

Unless the daytime co-workers have worked there long enough to accrue wages, you should be making at least $1.00 hour differential. Not all companies pay it, but then you should move on, or only accept jobs that start at higher wages. Move up to a hotel with more stars.

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Cc cC in Boise, Idaho

5 months ago

bigdog in Mesa, Arizona said: there should be a shift diff they make 9 you should make 9.50 that's normal. but that varies from hotel to hotel

I make $1.50 differential, top start on audit. The last hotel paid me 8.00 for rotating, audit had no differential, the one before that, I got $1.00 and then they never gave me another raise. After 5 years, the starting wage had been bumped up a few times, and I was only making .25 more in the end. That sucked.

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Cc cC in Boise, Idaho

5 months ago

ThatIsNotMyName in Nashville, Tennessee said: Hotel clerks aren't covered by break laws because of the nature of the job. Some jobs are like that.

Keep track of all the days and all the times, and then if they ever severe your employment, take them to court, you will win.

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Cc cC in Boise, Idaho

5 months ago

cnealmaher in Oakland, California said: I wouldn't mind being a night auditor. I've taken Accounting in High School and did two semester of Accounting courses.

Lol, get ready to do A LOT of laundry lol

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SeanJWebb in Toronto, Ontario

1 month ago

troupex in Essen, Germany said: hey all
I am a new night auditor in 110 romms I am the only person on my shift I have to combine during my shift between doing all the paperwork day reports ..ect deal with geust cleaning the front office some times I could get more tasks thants normal because it dependes on how many guests we have in the hotel or how many ceremonies and conference we will have in the next day anyway in my opnion thats not a very hard work for some one who should do that druning a day shift but it could be some times hard for some one who doing that during the night shift cause of the body condition anyway my question is for the night auditors with a experiance in this job

is there any health hazards doing this job working 5 night in every week and some times 11 nights in one time ?
if yes please would you tell me which hatards and how to avoide them ?
I am saying that because it s kind of hard to adapt your body on this timing work thank you all night auditors

If you can't move to a larger hotel with a larger staff and higher wages try cruise ships. You can get some excellent hospitality experience and see the work. If you have a diploma you can move up to a front desk supevisor pretty quickly. Or join the activity staff. It's fun and you spend less time at a desk.

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