Hygiene vs. Nursing

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JS in Bethesda, Maryland

41 months ago

Re: tremor, it depends how it would affect what you had to do as DH/DA. I leave it to other DA's to answer.

In general, my advise is: do what you really wish to do.
I got a job in a field/specialty that I have a real desire to succeed in.
It's not just a job but something I am predisposed to and wanted to do a lot.
As a result, I don't feel tired after work, I don't feel like I am going to hell in the morning when I go to work, and, despite extraordinary large volume of tasks I must get myself familiarized with I do not feel at a loss.
But most importantly: this is the field I wanted to be in.
Do not go for a specialty just because it pays. If you hate doing it you will be cursing yourself to a life sentence.

Good luck with whatever you choose to do!

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Ej in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

31 months ago

Did you make that up. Dental hygienist dont diagnose. If there is a lesion in the doctor will not send the patient to see the hygienist until they have been seen and cleared by the physician. hygienist do sub gingival scaling they do not deal with the tissue so how did the patient die from a cleaning. Sorry but whoever told you that lied.

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still retired in Hawaii

31 months ago

We (DH's) are only allowed to tell patients signs and symptoms of gingival health health without diagnosis. As for lesions we as clinicians measure the lesion, document, even continue with treatment and refer to an oral surgeon to biopsy per DDS. Within the last 8 months 2 of our patients tested positive for cancer. Chemo etc etc.The mouth is a good teller of our body not being healthy.

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exp in Massachusetts

31 months ago

Right on Still retired in Hawaii....I do the old fashioned oral exam at every prophy appt. So many seem to skip this...and it really only takes a couple of minutes...palpitation, viewing , etc....I don't have the visiscope or other devises, but I too have found and asked the Dr. what he thinks on a few occasions....it does seem many Dentists want us to do their job of scanning and doing IOE's too....not right as to an initial exam....but, I have 2 Dentists that do address and back me up on biopsies....I always note growths, etc...and show the patient the area.

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exp in Massachusetts

31 months ago

oops...palpations

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still retired in Hawaii

31 months ago

Pathology has always amazed me. I get a ķick out of this tiny town I work in. So many supernumerary premolars and congenital missing laterals. Lots of close bloodlines....just saying.

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exp in Massachusetts

31 months ago

That's interesting Srin Hawaii....once I was working in an office, I had an interesting case...not supernumerary, but due to a large tumor, a patient had their zygomactic arch bone removed...the prosthetic and wearing of glasses to take others view away from the actual situation was wonderful...also , the patient actually spoke well with it....the pt. informed me before removal....it was very light weight and filled the area so well. Later I spoke with the Dentist who made it and expressed my interest in the prosthetics he was able to make....just wonderful dentistry....really working with the patient. *

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June in San Francisco, California

29 months ago

I'm 26yo and am looking to get out of the corporate world. I'm going back and forth between nursing and DH. My dad is a nurse, so I know how physically, mentally and emotionally demanding the job can be. He's also worked holidays for most of my life.

I love teeth and working with people. I would like to work in DH for several years and eventually teach before I retire. After researching, I have a few questions:

1) The job outlook for DH is high. But it seems that dentists are greedy, and there are tons of unemployed hygienists out there. Do you think the DH job outlook is wrong?

2) Anyone ever work as a DH in California? How do taxes work? I'm worried I'll have to file taxes as a contractor, and I'll have to pay 30% of my income to taxes...

3) In terms of job outlook and stability, is DH a shaky choice? Why?

Thanks!

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Jessica in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

27 months ago

twinsy in Miami, Oklahoma said: That is sooo true! I thought the same thing - that what are the chances of someone dying in the chair? Anxiety- yes. Anyway. I am currently enrolled in an RN program but my heart is in DH. (I really like teeth.) I worked really hard to get into the DH program; however, 3 weeks before to the end of the 2nd semester I failed the proficiency. (I feel it was a combo of both me and the instructors.) Anyway, I was soooo depressed, but I now feel I should have just jumped right back in there and applied at another school. I was afraid to and had lost much of my self esteem and confidence. Anyway, now I'm enrolled in an RN program. It hasn't even been a week yet, but I feel I am just there to check it out. I like the idea of specializing. Can an RN specialize? Can you give me any insights to my delimma? Please let me hear them.

Friends, at the time of my DH demise, said, "oh, it's the way it's suppose to be." But, what about the phrase, "If at first you don't succeed, try and try again?"

What program did you get eliminated from? I was eliminated from my DH program, as well. The instructors said it's because of my dexterity, however, I feel it's because they did not like me. The instructors were not the brightest crayons in the box mind you. Sorry for responding to a message from 75 months ago, just felt I needed to say something! :-)

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Jessica in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

27 months ago

twinsy in Miami, Oklahoma said: Go for it! Be a nurse. If it's your calling and in your heart - do it. Keep in mind there is always something negative And positive with every job/career. Nurses need to be passionate about what they're doing. It sounds like the career for YOU.

Oh! I replied to your other comment because I lived in Joplin, MO. It said you lived in Miami, OK which is really close to Joplin :-)

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PLF in Abilene, Texas

20 months ago

BSNs also have be aware of adverse reactions for the 10-30 medications that we administer to a single patient at one time. Plus the next 4 patients all for the next 12 hours. Systemic infections? Like IV, Central lines, and PICC lines we give meds through multiple times a day for all our patients. Does that count? Also we have to be familiar with their diagnosis and co-morbidities, the tests, treatments and meds. We are the advocate and last line of defense for our patients. Being a good nurse is a calling, not a job.

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running1987 in New York, New York

19 months ago

I think both are equally a challenge in their own ways. I know with Hygiene school you have the option to pursue a bachelor's degree. Some places people say the market is hopping. I know it's pretty dry up here. Also most top off around $80,000 work part time, but do full time work by working two job's. I guess can go further with a Master's in Public Heath or Health Care Administration run your own office. Can maybe go further on to become a Dentist.

As far as nursing I like to pursue it due to the limited options you have in terms of area's to work. What I don't like looking at nursing as a student is nursing education. Most of maybe 4 out of 20 hospitals in our state only take nurse's with BSNS or enrolled in RN-BSN programs.

Also job's are limited in the area I mean there are job's, but as I said above. Additionally, nursing if you want to specialize have to pursue a master and possibly a Doctorate. I just want to be a nurse, ha.

Then nursing school we have 6 to 8 community college program's in our state. Wait list is 3 to 4 year's. 40% of the class is picked out of a hat a lottery ha! 50% is top student's. Then 10% with LPNs or employer's who hold spots for employees in the program.

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Alex in Passaic, New Jersey

16 months ago

Arwen in Astoria, New York said: I am both and RN and an RDH. Both jobs have their positives and negatives. I am currently working as an RDH making 39/ hr in NYC with no bennies. Formerly, I worked as an Hospital RN in NJ for 32/hr with bennies. The following is just an opinion because I am fortunate enough to have experience in the two fantastic fields.

Dental Hygiene Vs Nursing Schooling: In general Dental Hygiene school was more agonizing only because you have to secure many of your own patients for clinicals. Nothing beats the stress of scrambling to find patients to be you guinea pig for clinic. Otherwise I found the nursing curriculum harder than the hygiene curriculum because there is more critical thinking involved in nursing. As for licensure, the national/state Hygiene boards were in general much harder than the NCLEX because there is a two part regional board as well plus a national board equaling 3 exams in total. One of those exams is a clinical component which nursing does not have.

Career: Nursing is more rewarding and challenging yet much more mentally and emotionally demanding than hygiene. The pay is comparable because nursing offers benefits whereas most hygiene jobs do not. Dental hygiene is much less stressful emotionally and mentally but much more stressful physically. It can get mundane and is not nearly as challenging as nursing. There is also very little opportunity for advancement. However it is a great career for people who do not want too much stress yet a great salary and need to juggle family responsibilities.

I was wondering if you can give me more insight. Like the working hours for both and Do you get any vacation time with either? It would help me a lot since I am not sure what to do at this point.

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zanny

3 months ago

Dental Hygiene makes more than RN's

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emily in Yonkers, New York

1 month ago

Jaclyn in Princeton, Missouri said: Yes DH is harder than Nursing. I am currently a Dental Hygiene student and I can tell you that for a DH degree more classes are involved..such as physical science classes.. Chemistry .. Biology . In Nursing the only prerequisites are A&P and Microbiology. Plus the math is different in DH with College Algebra being incorporated and with Nursing only Allied Health Math.

Are you going for your associates degree

are you going for your associates degree?

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Teila in Panama City, Florida

1 month ago

zanny said: Dental Hygiene makes more than RN's

(eyeroll) I wish people would quit making ridiculous fallacious statements. The bottom line is that it's harder today for a a DH to find work and they have far less options. A DH will not make more on average per annum than a military nurse or a nurse anesthetist, or a lot of nurse practitioners, or advance practice nurses or... I can go on. DH was great in the 80's, but today it's like someone thinking that they're going to find a lot of work by going through 2 years of college studying ultrasound / x-ray... it just doesn't make sense today because the medical business landscape has changed dramatically over the years.
Nursing is the best bet career wise hands down. DH is currently a career path to paying a lot of money for financial uncertainty.

I'd encourage people interested in DH to look at dentistry as a whole. Dental schools are turning out dentists who are thrown into a reality of getting less NET PAY per annum than some 21 year old who just graduated from engineering school. The dental industry as a whole is nothing like it used to be. You need a wake up call.

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