Is there a difference between an associates in Paralegal Studies and a Paralegal Certificate?

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Jennifer Hebert in Portland, Texas

100 months ago

I hope this is not a stupid question but I keep reading that the minimal qualifications are an associates degree and a paralegal certificate. I am working on my associates degree in paralegal studies right now. Will I still need a paralegal certificate too? Im so sorry if this is a stupid question but I am confused! Thanks, Jennifer

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MH in San Jose, California

100 months ago

No, there is no difference.

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Jennifer Hebert in Portland, Texas

100 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Every degree program I've heard of issues a paralegal certificate with the degree. The paralegal certificate is generally ABA approved. Are you receiving an American Bar Association paralegal certificate along with your degree, Jennifer? If not, I'd say there's quite a difference.

(corrected)

Unfortunately, I am not receiving an ABA approved paralegal certificate. I have done so much research on the paralegal profession and schooling and I had no schools around me that offered an ABA paralegal certificate. Plus, I am traveling right now and I am away from my hometown. So I am attending an online school working on an associates degree in Paralegal Studies. I hope by receiving an Un-ABA approved degree or certificate I have not closed a lot of doors!

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Jennifer Hebert in Portland, Texas

100 months ago

As far as I know, I will only receive the degree.
The school says after graduating from the program you are able to sit for the NALA exam.

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Jennifer Hebert in Portland, Texas

100 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: You should sit for that exam. I understand the NALA CLA credential is a big deal in Texas.

Yeah, I plan on it.
Right now I am living in Texas but am from Louisiana, which is where I plan on working.
Either way, I'm going to take the exam.

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Jennifer Hebert in Portland, Texas

100 months ago

Thanks for the Good Luck wishes!
I need all I can get :)
I have looked at a lot of job postings.
Some want people with ABA certficates, some want people with a bachelor's degree, and some want people with an associates, but ALL want paralegals with experience. Thats going to be my hardest dillema to get through. I have been thinking about volunteering for a local advocacy center for the elderly and disabled in Louisiana. Maybe that will help?

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Jennifer Hebert in Portland, Texas

100 months ago

Yeah, I figure some experience in the field will benefit me, even if it is by volunteering and it's not detailed work. Can't hurt! Well, thankyou for all of your help :)

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Jennifer Hebert in Barksdale Afb, Louisiana

100 months ago

Ok, Thanks! All of them want so much experience though. Like 7 years!

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MPS Guinea Pig in Pensacola, Florida

100 months ago

Jennifer Hebert in Portland, Texas said: I hope this is not a stupid question but I keep reading that the minimal qualifications are an associates degree and a paralegal certificate. I am working on my associates degree in paralegal studies right now. Will I still need a paralegal certificate too? Im so sorry if this is a stupid question but I am confused! Thanks, Jennifer

Yes, there is a difference between an Associate's degree and a certificate. An Associate's degree is a 2 year college degree, usually from a college or university that is regionally accredited by a NEA approved educational institution. There are some for-profit companies that offer 'Associates' degrees; be sure to verify their accreditation status or you may wind up with a somewhat expensive 'piece of paper'. There are many paralegal degree programs who have also received ABA approval. Those programs usually issue a certificate upon completion of the college degree that states you completed an ABA approved program.

There are also some ABA approved paralegal certificate programs, which do not result in receiving a college degree (2 or 4 year). These programs vary from 6-18 mos. in length, and upon completion, you'll receive a Paralegal Certificate.

A 'certificate' should not be confused with 'certification'. Certification requires passing a nationally recognized certification exam such as NALA's CLA/CP or PACE's RP exams. Those advanced certification programs require some combination of paralegal education and/or work experience in order to take them.

Employer preference for ABA approval, certification, and general education requirements vary regionally and from job market to job market. Your biggest hurdle is work experience. I recommend volunteering with any local pro-bono, legal aid, or advocacy office. You may also want to try an entry level secretary position to get your foot in the door and learn basic legal practices and procedure. Good Luck!

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Working Paralegal in Ft Mitchell, Kentucky

100 months ago

In my area, a paralegal degree is either an associate's degree or bachelor's degree in paralegal studies. A paralegal certificate is generally earned by someone who already has a degree in another field. I have a degree in Economics and a paralegal certificate. In essence, the certificate is an endorsement on the bachelor's degree. Hope this helps

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Jane Do Girl in Milton, Florida

100 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Good answer, though I disagree with getting a secretary job. IMO it's bad psychology. You'll always be thought of as a secretary and may never be allowed to advance to paralegal.

I respectfully disagree. I started out as a legal secretary with a sole practitioner, and am now the senior litigation paralegal at one of the oldest, most prestigious firms in town. Hard work, going the extra mile, excellent work product, professionalism, and taking the initiative to learn new things on my own earned me the respect of other paralegals and attorneys I've become acquainted with over the years.

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Jane Do Girl in Milton, Florida

100 months ago

"Did you have a paralegal certificate when you started as a legal secretary?" No.

"Did the sole practitioner give you paralegal responsibilities?" Yes.

"How many times did you have to change jobs before you arrived at your current position?" One.

I know many paralegals who began as secretaries; some have paralegal degrees or certificates, some do not. What they all have in common are the characteristics I outlined in my previous post. I find these paralegals are generally more well-rounded in terms of being able to function in any capacity or do any task, which makes them very valuable to their employers and co-workers.

As with anything there are no absolutes; but an individual who works hard, goes the extra mile, produces excellent work product and professionalism, and takes the initiative will advance and succeed more often than not.

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OJ in Charlotte, North Carolina

99 months ago

I was wondering if there was a difference between getting a paralegal certificate
than a paralegal degree. Is the time frame for both different and if so what is it?

I am thinking of going into the investing business and would like to know
which one would be benificial to me as far as getting this done.

I was also told if considering an online course to make sure that it is ABA approved
so I am having a difficult time deciding on which course to choose. Any advise would be appreciated.

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different fields for paralegals in Dallas, Texas

99 months ago

I began my College majoring in Psychology, but after my Junior year at A&M, I choose to take another path towards the paralegal field. After receiving an Associates degree in Paralegal Studies I started working for the first firm that would take me, i.e. it is a SOB to even get a paying internship little less getting an actual full time paralegal position. I have now been a paralegal for three (3) years working for an Insurance Defense Firm. Don’t get me wrong, I love my job. Basically, I am just wanting to work somewhere that will better utilize me more in legal research, writing and document review. As crazy as it sounds, I love to review and summarize voluminous production that has been propounded on my attorney by Plaintiffs counsel in most of our cases.

Any ideas?

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different fields for paralegals in Dallas, Texas

99 months ago

I began my College years majoring in Psychology, but after my Junior year at A&M, I choose to take another path, more towards the paralegal field.

After receiving an Associates degree in Paralegal Studies I started working for the first firm that would hire me. i.e. it really is a SOB to even get a paying internship little less getting an actual full time paralegal job.

I have now been a paralegal for three (3) years working for an Insurance Defense Firm. Do not get me wrong, I like my job. Basically, I am just wanting to work somewhere that will better utilize me more in research, writing and document review. As crazy as it sounds, I love to review and summarize voluminous production that has been propounded on my attorney by Plaintiffs counsel or drafting page/line summaries on deposition transcripts.

Any ideas?

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Kimberli in Los Angeles, California

99 months ago

It's likely that your Paralegal Associates Degree is also a certificate. You should research your states laws on paralegal regulation. Some states require certification and are specific as to who can call themselves a paralegal. Other states have no regulation at all. Chances are your associates degree in Paralegal Studies will be sufficient. It will help if your program is ABA approved as well, but I'm not sure if its required under your states laws. A little research can answer a lot of your questions.

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Phoenix in West Babylon, New York

98 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: One more point to add. Most ABA schools require a college degree for admission unless you are earning the certificate along with a degree.

I am aware of that in most cases they require an associate or a 4 year degree for entrance into a certificate program.

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Phoenix in West Babylon, New York

98 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: One more point to add. Most ABA schools require a college degree for admission unless you are earning the certificate along with a degree.

Are you an ABA Paralegal, and if so why are you a displaced worker?

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Phoenix in West Babylon, New York

98 months ago

If I have a 4 year degree from Columbia or NYU I seriously doubt that my regionally accredited paralegal certificate will keep me from landing a good paralegal job. It is all about marketing yourself, keeping in mind that some of those same employers who say that they only want ABA program graduates will a lot of non ABA grads on staff. So network, make friends in high places and don't let job requirements deter you. Enroll in a program that is right for you, be it a regionally accredited program or an ABA approved program.

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Don Kovaleski in Nashville, Tennessee

98 months ago

Yes, there is a difference. A degree in paralegal studies or paralegal technology, typically an Applied Science degree, incorporates not only the legal training but the core classes - math, english, - required in a typical degree program. Most attorneys are now learning to distinguish between these programs and as such, are becoming more selective when evaluating "paralegal" candidates and their qualifications.

Additionally, a "certificate" program is often a short program, usually 12-16 weeks, rather than the typical 2-year associates track. It IS NOT a degree. Many institutions offering these programs are not approved by the ABA or AAfPE and as such, will not qualify you for the CLA or PACE exam.

You need to choose carefully before you commit to a program from an unaccredited institution. Often, the cost is equal to or greater than that of an accreditited 2-year institution and if you choose wrong, you'll have nothing to show for your efforts when you're done.

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Phoenix in West Babylon, New York

98 months ago

Don Kovaleski in Nashville, Tennessee said: Yes, there is a difference. A degree in paralegal studies or paralegal technology, typically an Applied Science degree, incorporates not only the legal training but the core classes - math, english, - required in a typical degree program. Most attorneys are now learning to distinguish between these programs and as such, are becoming more selective when evaluating "paralegal" candidates and their qualifications.

Additionally, a "certificate" program is often a short program, usually 12-16 weeks, rather than the typical 2-year associates track. It IS NOT a degree. Many institutions offering these programs are not approved by the ABA or AAfPE and as such, will not qualify you for the CLA or PACE exam.

You need to choose carefully before you commit to a program from an unaccredited institution. Often, the cost is equal to or greater than that of an accreditited 2-year institution and if you choose wrong, you'll have nothing to show for your efforts when you're done.

You can qualify to sit for NALA's CP or CLA exam with a non ABA certificate as long as it is a 900 hour program.

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Compliance Professional in Pewaukee, Wisconsin

96 months ago

Is there a certain certificate that is considering more prestigious or more saught out than the other? i.e. NALA - CLA, CP or AAP - AACP or NFPA - PP, RP

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candythelegalsecy in Denver, Colorado

96 months ago

I have 20 years of litigation support legal sec'y experience; I'm re-entering the job market after taking some years off to finish raising my kids - would a lawfirm consider my 20 years as enough experience to hire me as a legal sec'y/paralegal?

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Sherrie in London, Ontario

95 months ago

What about a Canadian who completed and obtained an Associates Degree in Paralegal from an american online school? 3.0 grade average

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WOLI Graduate in Nanuet, New York

95 months ago

You need to go to a school that is regionally accredited, whether for a certificate or a degree. A certificate from a regionally accredited school usually means that you have taken many legal courses. An associate's degree, by contrast, requires you to take general studies, such as science, math, economics, foreign language, etc., stuff that is not really relevant to the career. I also read in Legal Assistant Today magazine that certificated paralegals tend to make higher salaries than paralegals who have degrees with a major in paralegal studies. This is due to the superior training in a regionally accredited certificate program.

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billy in Stony Brook, New York

95 months ago

WOLI Graduate in Nanuet, New York said: You need to go to a school that is regionally accredited, whether for a certificate or a degree. A certificate from a regionally accredited school usually means that you have taken many legal courses. An associate's degree, by contrast, requires you to take general studies, such as science, math, economics, foreign language, etc., stuff that is not really relevant to the career. I also read in Legal Assistant Today magazine that certificated paralegals tend to make higher salaries than paralegals who have degrees with a major in paralegal studies. This is due to the superior training in a regionally accredited certificate program.

Hey I am planning on taking either the Paralegel A.A.S Degree Program at an ABA approved local college or the ABA approved certificate program here in NY. Which would benefit me more due to the fact that I am graduating this semester from an 4 year university with a degree in History and Business.

I am not sure about going to law school and I feel becoming an paralegal with get me into the field and help me decide on my future.

Which would A: most likely pay more? cert or AAS

and B: which would be more useful in obtaining a job? Cert or AAS

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Anonymous in Austin, Texas

95 months ago

Is there a difference between a Bachelor in Paralegal vs. Associates degree in Paralegal? I've noticed that the majority of schools offer the associates; however, I've also seen some other schools offer the bachelor in paralegal. Is there a big difference and should I go after one or the other?

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Anonymous in Austin, Texas

95 months ago

Thanks so much. I am planning on attending law school after I get a four yr. degree, which is from what I understand, a requirement, as well as taking the LSAT.
So in other words, I should shoot for a 4 yr. degree regardless, but since I'm going to be working as a court reporter (going to be taking my board exam next month), I thought I'd like to start out at community college to take some courses and possibly see what transfer curriculum they have so that I could transfer to a university. I'm not quite sure what the exact recommended plan would be, but I know I'll consult with a counselor on that (as far as what classes, etc.) I am just a court reporter who has always had more of a passion for law and politics, so I would like to gain more knowledge and experience in this area.
Thanks again for all your help. Please feel free to share any thoughts on this post. I'd appreciate it!

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brandi in Lake Charles, Louisiana

94 months ago

Jennifer Hebert in Portland, Texas said: I hope this is not a stupid question but I keep reading that the minimal qualifications are an associates degree and a paralegal certificate. I am working on my associates degree in paralegal studies right now. Will I still need a paralegal certificate too? Im so sorry if this is a stupid question but I am confused! Thanks, Jennifer

i hope you don't mind but i was wondering which online school you are taking? i have been back and forth with woli(washington online learning institute) and aips( american institute for paralegal studies)any help on this would be great...i don't want to make a bad choice!

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billy in Commack, New York

94 months ago

I have heard, not to warn anyone, that many jobs will not take applicants who got education from an online program. Although I could be wrong, I have gone to many interviews over the past couple of weeks and many lawyers and law firms have discussed unfavor towards any programs taken online, due to the fact you don't interact with people. Right now I go to a community college for the certificate and many professors say the same thing, but that could be bias because they get paid to teach.

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cynthia822 in Morristown, New Jersey

94 months ago

Billy, I don't that is true at all. In my firm, we have five paralegals that went to online schools and they are doing fine. Online education is in many ways superior to classroom education. You can re-visit your lessons anytime you wish for one thing. And, contrary to what you write, there is huge interaction online with people, even more than you get in a classroom. I should know; I went to an online school and got a very nice job, more than two years ago! Online education is being accepted across the board these days, especially at law firms. Four of the five paralegals are our firm went to Washington Online Learning Institute (WOLI), including me, and the partners very intersted in new WOLI graduates based on their experience so far. Online education used to be the wave of the future, but from what I have seen and read it is here now. You just have to make sure the school is regionally accredited (Middle States, etc.). Don't settle for a "distance education" accrediting agency.

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brandi in Lake Charles, Louisiana

94 months ago

well i was looking at woli...and also american institute for paralegal studies...i'm not sure who to go with...any help on this , would be wonderful! considering you took the courses with woli!
did you take the master paralegal program?
i am in no shape to make a bad choice here....so any help with this, would mean the world!
thanks

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Karen in Austin, Texas

94 months ago

Hi,
Does anyone have any knowledge of Strayer University online? I was just reading about WOLI and wanted to see if anyone had an opinion regarding a university online such as Strayer, vs. WOLI. Strayer offers a bachelors degree in Paralegal as well as Legal Studies.

Also wondering if WOLI's Paralegal programs are ABA recognized; as well as Strayer's...couldn't find that info on their websites. I guess I could contact them and ask; from what I understand, it's better to have a certificate/degree that is recognized by the ABA.

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cynthia822 in Morristown, New Jersey

94 months ago

Pardon me for butting in, but you can not compare aviation, where you use all five senses (smell included) to legal studies. You use your brain in online learning and that is the most important of all. You also use sight, hearing, touch, but I don't think you use taste or smell, nor do I think those two senses have a lot to do with legal courses. Also, online learning is not at all like correspondence courses. At WOLI, the online classes were fast, dynamic, and interactive. You can log on 24/7 and there is always something new and exciting to do. So I totally disagree with you, based on relevant experience. Online learning at a great school like WOLI is simply a wonderful and convenient way to earn certification.

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kmm in Wilmington, Delaware

94 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Whatever you want to to think, but the subject does not matter. Learning is learning. Hearing and listening are vital to any kind of learning. You don't get to use hearing with online learning.

According to the FAA Aviation Instructor's Handbook, psychologists have found that learning occurs more rapidly when information is received through more than one sense. Of course you will use sight with online instruction, but you won't be using hearing. The Handbook states that hearing accounts for thirteen percent of all perceptions. Seeing and hearing accounts for eighty-eight percent of all perceptions.

Further, actual school attendance imposes a discipline that fosters learning. Face it, people will be less disciplined if they can log on to their online class as they please.

Of course you will stick up for your school. I stand by my opinions.

I agree DlP- Learning in the classroom is way better. You read the material the night before, you listen to the lecture and take notes, a learning method, you get to ask questions, questions are asked of you, ah the socratic method.

Yes you can get your degree online- and for some it mght work just fine. However- the displine of learning is stronger in a classroom set up - you have task and responsibilites imposed upon you. What not compare avaiation learning skills to learning the law- I believe your point was "anologous"

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billy in Commack, New York

94 months ago

Cynthia822 in Morristown, New Jersey said: Billy, I don't that is true at all. In my firm, we have five paralegals that went to online schools and they are doing fine. Online education is in many ways superior to classroom education. You can re-visit your lessons anytime you wish for one thing. And, contrary to what you write, there is huge interaction online with people, even more than you get in a classroom. I should know; I went to an online school and got a very nice job, more than two years ago! Online education is being accepted across the board these days, especially at law firms. Four of the five paralegals are our firm went to Washington Online Learning Institute (WOLI), including me, and the partners very intersted in new WOLI graduates based on their experience so far. Online education used to be the wave of the future, but from what I have seen and read it is here now. You just have to make sure the school is regionally accredited (Middle States, etc.). Don't settle for a "distance education" accrediting agency.

Im sure in your opinion that online is more interactive, I just feel that classroom experience offers more real world communication skills that you can't learn online. I'm just saying that many interviews I have gone to, specifically one in the corporate business sector, specifically asked me whether I was persuing an online paralegal certificate, and specifically told me they look down on them due to the fact there is no person to person interaction.

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cynthia822 in Morristown, New Jersey

94 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Whatever you want to to think, but the subject does not matter. Learning is learning. Hearing and listening are vital to any kind of learning. You don't get to use hearing with online learning.

According to the FAA Aviation Instructor's Handbook, psychologists have found that learning occurs more rapidly when information is received through more than one sense. Of course you will use sight with online instruction, but you won't be using hearing. The Handbook states that hearing accounts for thirteen percent of all perceptions. Seeing and hearing accounts for eighty-eight percent of all perceptions.

Further, actual school attendance imposes a discipline that fosters learning. Face it, people will be less disciplined if they can log on to their online class as they please.

Of course you will stick up for your school. I stand by my opinions.

In fact, we did a LOT of listening and hearing at WOLI. They have dozens of audio lectures recorded on line so you can go into the classroom and select from a library of recorded lectures on many different legal topics. The great thing about WOLI is that you can hear these lectures as many times as you wish. Or you can listen to part now and part later, depending on your schedule. So, to sum up, online learning at a great school like WOLI does include a lot of listening and hearing (and reading and writing)!

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cynthia822 in Morristown, New Jersey

94 months ago

That is contrary to the experience of thousands of highly placed graduates of online schools.

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Brandi in Lake Charles, Louisiana

94 months ago

Cynthia, Can you recommend which one to take...
the regular paralegal or the master paralegal?

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cynthia822 in Morristown, New Jersey

94 months ago

I would recommend the 15-month Master Paralegal Certificate Program. The reason I say that is that I started in the ten-month program and it was just so great that I eventually took the remaining four courses and got the Master Certification. Unfortunately for me, it cost me more than it would have if I had enrolled up front because their tuition increased during the ten months I was there in the ten month program. If I had locked in the lower tuition up front, I could have saved some money. However, the tuition is well worth it at WOLI. I really feel like I got my money's worth. I know students that went to colleges and paid double what I paid and I don't think their education was better at all.

What I found was that the major law firms and corporations are sending the students to the 15 month program (we had a whole bunch from the IBM legal department in our class) and that it is a very impressive credential on the resume. You also get a few more months of reinforcement of legal concepts so that when I interviewed for jobs I was much more fluent and knowledgable. The ten month program is fine, but the 15 month Master Paralegal Certificate Program is outstanding.

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Brandi in Lake Charles, Louisiana

94 months ago

Thank you So Much for taking the time...it can be confusing!

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aaron5366 in North Bergen, New Jersey

91 months ago

I am considering a Paralegal Program but my gender is Male.
Does anyone have any opinions/experiences on Males vs. Females in the Paralegal field?

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Marla Fisher in Long Beach, California

91 months ago

FYI, you need to be very cautious about any trade schools you consider for any job. Many of them are not candid about the accreditation they offer and what it means. I am a newspaper reporter and you can read some stories I have written on this topic. This forum will not let me post URLs however you can google based on the headlines and find the stories easily. Here are some headlines you can google:
Students wanted jobs, but got debt instead
Trade school pitfall: Lack of accreditation can strand grads

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cynthia822 in Morristown, New Jersey

91 months ago

I totally agree about accreditation. You HAVE to check it out. I checked it out really carefully and that is why I finally decided to go to Washington Online Learning Institute (WOLI). They are accredited by Middle States, the same organization that accredits New York University and Cornell, so I knew I was making the right decision. And it was really good as I got a great job from that school, which was a great educational experience, the best of my life in fact. And, contrary to what I have been reading on this forum, I LOVE being a paralegal. You just need to find the right firm to work for.

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Jane Do Girl in Cantonment, Florida

91 months ago

I think many graduates of online programs feel the stigma of their online degrees, thus the vigorous defense of their alma mater. I have 3 undergraduate degrees from brick & mortar universities and am currently pursuing a graduate degree from an online program. I can assure you that an online education cannot compare with that provided in a traditional classroom setting. As DLP mentioned, online education is 2-dimensional at best and stifles the intellectual process that is fostered when 20 or more highly motivated minds are in a classroom discussing/debating a particular issue with instant feedback from their peers and instructor.

Additionally, you miss out on the networking opportunities afforded by getting to know your future colleagues face to face, as well as the personal relationship you can develop with your instructors who have contacts in the legal field (future employers). It is also difficult, impossible I imagine, to obtain internships which provide hands-on experience as well as additional networking opportunities.

While online graduates do find employment, they are a fractional percentage of the paralegal profession at large and many firms are still reluctant to hire them. I suggest checking out your local paralegal association and asking about the credentials of its members. That will give you a better idea of the perception and receptiveness of online paralegal programs in the local job market.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

91 months ago

So many male old-school attorneys love to be surrounded by sweet young thangs with great bodies and 10-inch heels.

Exactly. For these young women, their looks is an advantage for them. They help to pick them up when they foul up (and I'm not just saying this because I'm not one of them).

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

91 months ago

I don't know the difference either. I have an AA Degree in Paralegal Studies from St. Petersburg College (Florida). It is an ABA approved program. They now have a Bachelor's Degree in Paralegal Studies. The Bachelor' was just started as I left (I was only there three terms). Maybe the Bachelor's people get a certificate.

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bgbg22 in Commack, New York

91 months ago

For the question about male paralegals:
I currently am 24 years old. Just graduated from my undergraduate school and am in the process of completing the year long ABA approved Paralegal Certificate Program. I would have to agree with the above comments. I tend to see all women in this study specifically doing it to gain an job as a paralegal/secretary position. While with the males, as myself for example I did it to make sure I wanted to become a lawyer. I didnt want to go to law school and hating 3 years because I didn't find it interesting.

I will admit, although I just got an internship for the Federal Government at the US Attorney's office here in New York, almost all the females were secretarys/paralegals and not one was a paralegal. I am in no way sexist, but the government sure seemed like it to me. As soon as I applied for the internship my interviewee (40-50 yr old woman-Head Paralegal) That you must be doing this to become an lawyer, I said how did you know, and she actually said to me there isnt many male paralegals who choose to be a paralegal as a lifetime career unlike many women who prefer secreterial work.

As for my internship I am mainly doin research for the US Attorneys office on a case, I am not doing any clerical work, answering phones, etc, pure research.

Well I hope my experience, as it is short, (I just finished my first semester in the program, the program goes for 3 semesters or 1.5 years, but I crunched it into two semesters so I could finish in may.) helped you aaron or anyone else.

I would highly reccommend this is your undergraduate school had no law specific degrees as mine did. (SUNY Stony Brook)

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Frederico' in Chicago, Illinois

89 months ago

MH in San Jose, California said: No, there is no difference.

nall, there are both one the same...the paralegal certificate is the credential sought after attaining the degree

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Frederico' in Chicago, Illinois

89 months ago

The actual undertaking of the sought after degree requires some ethical consideration for those who are qualified. If so, you may visit some of the paralegal associations and find the links to taking the exam. There are significant filing fees for the actual exam, but it is well worth your time. In addition to this, you can also apply for membership and review the bylaws.

Remember: Fidelity, bravery, and integrity

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