Alternative Careers in Pharmacy

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akshay in Calgary, Alberta

88 months ago

iam a bpharm graduate from india.i have 7 years experience in working as a pharmacist .i came here in april.what jobs i get here without getting licence.how to get certificates from alberta college of pharmacy.

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Lovely Irene Garcia in Davao, Philippines

67 months ago

kirs in Vancouver, Washington said: I graduated in 2007 and have had the same retail experience as most of you have described.. with the occasional robbery! I felt frustrated with working evenings and weekends.. I am now working in mail order.. which I find very boring, but its a day job and much less stressful. I spent time looking at other careers and was considering a PA license.. the program is 1 year and would probably not be too difficult to get in after having a pharmacist license. I am also considering a residency, but am unsure of the hospital pharmacist needs in my area.. I can't believe how dissapointed I am with my degree..

You shouldn’t be disappointed because according to an article I read the pharmacist pay rate based on experience ranges from:

YEARS OF EXPERIENCE SALARY RANGE
Less than 1 year $67,659 – $99,926
1-4 years $68,613 - $101,073
5-9 years $83,439 – $101,601
10-19 years $87,746 – $109,413
20 years and above $93,475 – $118,965

Now the top 3 cities that give high paying rate to pharmacist are
• Houston
• Dallas
• Los angeles

With regards to different state, the top 3 highest are the following
• Texas
• Illinois
• Florida

You should check your State Department of Labor for job opportunities and if there are none, may be it's time to leave home and go somewhere else to establish a career.

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murray in Oradell, New Jersey

64 months ago

I know that there is a glut of pharmacists in this tri-state area. If I were just getting out of school in this economic climate, I would try to go for extra training/ specialization by doing a residency or specialty. At least you are getting paid while you learn (maybe not as much as you would otherwise, but it beats not working at all). Also, this gives you a chance to feel out a place. You may even be able to get a job at the same place when your residency is done--they don't have to train you. It seems like such a waste to go to pharmacy school and not find a job and get the decent pay (compared to a lot of other professions). These economic times are VERY discouraging for everyone. I am also feeling that way. There is no perfect job! A lot of us work just to get the health insurance, especially if you are the one who provides it for your family.

If I were able to move, I'd look around for places that have a good quality of life-- and get out of this rat race in the NJ/NY area. Some places seem to have more openings than others. It seems from the postings that retail has a very high burnout rate. I've mostly worked in hospital. Every place has its pros and cons. Sometimes, it's just time to move on to something else.

Good luck!

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undecided and stressed in Glenview Nas, Illinois

64 months ago

since high school i've wanted to become a pharmacist. I work for a great pharmacy company now but def not sure what will happen in 5 years. I got accepted into chiropractic school (duo degree in chiropractics and naturopathic medicine) and also pharmacy school. i do not know which decision may be a better choice in 10/20 years. i do not want to have debt from pharmacy school nor a career that has no job openings. any advice on what may be a better career will be helpful!

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PharmD in Parsippany, New Jersey

64 months ago

I was fired from a large retail phamacy in New York a month ago by a witch of a DM
I think they are trying to unload their older pharmacist I worked for them for a year and a half without incident then this new DM
absolutely created the worst envirnonment and use so called company policies to write you up --she wrote you up for not answering the phones within 3 rings, and when there was a custome complaint even if the customer was totally out of line you got written up (eg following state laws)
I have a PharmD from Rutgers 2007 before that stay at home mom and didn't practice for over 8 years then divorce brought me back into the field==
I can't believe how unprofessional some of these new managers have become I know of another pharmcist who is getting sick bc she is being harrassed by this same manager (she is also older) Has anyone else felt discriminated against due to age by these large retail companies?

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yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

64 months ago

I sympathize w you very much. I have said for the last year, that with the ever tightening pharmacist market, employers will do all they can to get rid of older pharmacists, and higher younger ones. The Pharmacy schools are actually encouraging this to make room for their new graduates who are seeing an oversupply developing. The schools want to show employers that the new graduates have skills that the old "dinosaurs" do not have.

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yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

64 months ago

undecided and stressed in Glenview Nas, Illinois said: since high school i've wanted to become a pharmacist. I work for a great pharmacy company now but def not sure what will happen in 5 years. I got accepted into chiropractic school (duo degree in chiropractics and naturopathic medicine) and also pharmacy school. i do not know which decision may be a better choice in 10/20 years. i do not want to have debt from pharmacy school nor a career that has no job openings. any advice on what may be a better career will be helpful!

My vote is for Chiropractic. Pharmacy is being oversupplied with a ton of new graduates and the job market will not be that good. Most pharmacy work is monotonous counting and pouring and will be greatly mechanized and taken over by lower paid professionals. Chiropractic is"hands on" and not as readily delegated to others. The level of satisfaction of pharmacists who have been in the field for a while is also rather low.

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yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

64 months ago

RPh in River Edge, New Jersey said: You can go to the following website: www.bls.gov/oco/oco2003.htm (cut and paste it). It is the Bureau of Labor Statistics website. That's probably the best projection for any job you are looking at. Good luck.

I disagree. The Bureau changes its profile every year, and they get their information from pharmacy schools and organizations in whose best interest it is to embellish to opportunities. Pharmacy job opportunities are drying up rapidly, especially in the Northeast. The Bureau is not as sensitive to the real market as many people might think

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yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

64 months ago

murray in Oradell, New Jersey said: I know that there is a glut of pharmacists in this tri-state area. If I were just getting out of school in this economic climate, I would try to go for extra training/ specialization by doing a residency or specialty. At least you are getting paid while you learn (maybe not as much as you would otherwise, but it beats not working at all). Also, this gives you a chance to feel out a place. You may even be able to get a job at the same place when your residency is done--they don't have to train you. It seems like such a waste to go to pharmacy school and not find a job and get the decent pay (compared to a lot of other professions). These economic times are VERY discouraging for everyone. I am also feeling that way. There is no perfect job! A lot of us work just to get the health insurance, especially if you are the one who provides it for your family.

If I were able to move, I'd look around for places that have a good quality of life-- and get out of this rat race in the NJ/NY area. Some places seem to have more openings than others. It seems from the postings that retail has a very high burnout rate. I've mostly worked in hospital. Every place has its pros and cons. Sometimes, it's just time to move on to something else.

Good luck!

Before you move, I think you should look at the fact that the pharmacy job market is saturating rapidly in many other areas, too. unless you are willing to relocate to a small town in the middle of nowhere, you will find a job market that is becoming increasingly tough. As the job markets become tighter, jobs become less pleasant as the employer then has the upper hand. If you can't fill prescriptions rapidly enough, you are out!!

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yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

64 months ago

lore2400 in Mooresville, North Carolina said: Ed, it sounds like you have experience in the field. I cannot contradict anything you have said, and don't get me started on some of the self-righteous "professors" who are no help whatsoever. I am pretty sure I will be looking for a job outside of pharmacy now. Do you have any advice/ideas whatsoever to help me find a job in a different field? I am not interested in going back to school, and I have an undergrad Biology degree. It makes me sick that I have all this debt to pay off and I've been unable to make even a dent in it so far. I realize I won't get close to the pay I could make as a pharmacist, but anything using the bio degree would be better than nothing at all. I would greatly appreciate any help you can give me. Thank you.

lore, depending upon your age, you might look at the pharmaceutical industry, and try to get into a large company. I think that you may have to re-consider getting some additional education, and try teaching- the pay is lower but it can lead to greater security and satisfaction. You could also consider going on a fast tract and quickly get an RN. With your background you could rise rapidly in that field. You could also look at insurance companies. It wont be easy, but you can transfer your skill elsewhere! wish you all the best! Ed

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High School Girl in Manchester, Iowa

64 months ago

Wow! I'm Farm Girl, the one that asked about debt load and pharmacy two months ago. After reading all of the comments after my posting, I won't touch Pharmacy with a ten foot pole. I did get into my first choice for college. I will manage my debts with a Pharmacy Tech job and major/minor in Business/Marketing/PR. I'm so sorry that everyone older than me is facing such difficulties. After careful research I know your course of study was difficult and should have paid off. I hope not to encounter what you have encountered upon graduation. I will continue to keep up with this posting.

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SARFARAZ in Clementon, New Jersey

63 months ago

DHEM in West Hartford, Connecticut said: Hi

Can anyone help me to get sponsorship in the USA as i am already a registered Pharmacist in NJ, PA, and Delaware. Salary is not an issue for me providing a company can sponsor my H1 visa. I can relocate anywhere.

hello i am looking for an rph in nj plesase call me at six zero nine two three four zero five six seven or email me at sahmedrph@gmail.com

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sophia77 in Parlin, New Jersey

62 months ago

lore2400 said: I started out as a nursing major, planning to be a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist. I had been working as a CNA (certified nursing assistant) and thought I would not be able to handle some of the things nurses have to deal with, so I changed my major. Now I wish I had stayed with nursing or had done something other than pharmacy school after my undergraduate. It remains to be seen how the new health care bill will affect practitioners such as primary care physicians, PAs, and NPs. All I know is that I regret taking out all the loans for a degree I cannot use. I hate that just after 5 years, pharmacy is already so old for you, purple 76. I interned at a chain store while I was in school, and I can definitely see how it would get old really fast. No matter what goes wrong with a prescription during filling, it's the pharmacist's fault. It could be the MD office, the MD, the insurance company, the patient, etc...but people don't want to hear it. They don't realize there's a process you need to go through before giving their meds at their copay. It is very sad that things like this are happening in a profession you have to go into so much debt to pursue. Thanks and good luck to you Tayo830!

hi!!!
I have a bachelors of Pharmacy from a foreign country and changed my career to nursing after moving to US. The thing is that I did not like nursing much and want to move back into pharmacy school and have my Pharm D. After reading all these coments, i am really surprised. I was thinking if I complete my nursing bachlor and have pharm d, will it be helpful to get job if not in retail, may be in pharmaceutical company. I am wondering if it right decision at this time to back into pharmacy school cuz i really wanted to have my pharmd. Although I am nursing school, I have wished i were in pharmacy school.
can u suggest me what would be right option for me right now?

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lore2400 in Mooresville, North Carolina

62 months ago

I don't know how much longer you would have to go to school here in the U.S. for a PharmD, and I understand that you want to get that degree. I don't know what the job market is like with pharmaceutical companies where you are, but where I am, it is impossible to get in with them. If I was in your position, I would strongly consider completing nursing school (pharm background will really help you in that program) and looking at becoming a nurse practitioner or other master's degree level position. You'll have to weigh the demand for each position against how much you think you'll enjoy each. Right now, I wish I would have stuck with nursing and just furthered my education with some type of master's degree. But, the job situation where you are living might be different. Hope this helps some. Good luck.

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sophia77 in Parlin, New Jersey

62 months ago

lore2400 in Mooresville, North Carolina said: I don't know how much longer you would have to go to school here in the U.S. for a PharmD, and I understand that you want to get that degree. I don't know what the job market is like with pharmaceutical companies where you are, but where I am, it is impossible to get in with them. If I was in your position, I would strongly consider completing nursing school (pharm background will really help you in that program) and looking at becoming a nurse practitioner or other master's degree level position. You'll have to weigh the demand for each position against how much you think you'll enjoy each. Right now, I wish I would have stuck with nursing and just furthered my education with some type of master's degree. But, the job situation where you are living might be different. Hope this helps some. Good luck.

thanx for ur reply,..
I was thinking to take this fall sem off to complete my pre-req for pharmacy and then comtinue with my last sem of nursing next year spring. It was cuz I want to apply for a pharmacy school next year. It is a 3 year long program, but really expensive. I am not much interested into nursing, and master will take a long way including the experience that I need to get into masters. Do you think in terms of job for pharmacists, its gonna continue like that?

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yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

62 months ago

Sophia, you can bet that the pharmacy job market will continue to get worse for the middle term future. The schools are bursting at the seams with new pharmacists, and the jobs are not available, especially if you want to live within 100 miles of a large city. The schools have blown it! They have based enrollment on wild predictions based on the needs of the chains to have a ready supply of pharmacists available. Be willing to move, or consider changing your career. Good Luck!

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Omo in Kenmore, Washington

61 months ago

yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania said: Dear trc. I have worked as a pharmacist for many years in upstate NY(Rochester, Syracuse, Albany) and worked for the State of New Jersey as a quality of care inspector for long term care facilities. I am telling you this-regardless of what schools like Wegman's @ St. John Fisher say- there will be a glut of pharmacists nationwide, and this is alreaday occurring in major Metro areas such as NYC, Philadelphia, Boston, etc. It may not have hit Monroe County, NY yet- but wait till the new graduates get out from the new schools! The schools have been feeding the students a lot of half truths about what they can do when they graduate, but the sad reality is that many of these new roles have yet to develop, and lick and stick pharmacy is where the money is right out of college. I worked part time in mail order pharmacy and have seen the future. machines do it all pharmacists just scan. Yes, you will need pharmacists for clinical support- but how many? The schools talk about the aging population, which is garbage, as the elderly will have so many tools for knowledge support without using the pharmacist. Rapidly advancing computer systems and better trained technicians will accelerate this. Pharmacists may have great skills for their profession, but it is a small divided profession with very poor political skills. Would be glad to confer any time. ed RPh

Glut is already here in Seattle, save your money- stay out of pharmacy school!

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Omo in Kenmore, Washington

61 months ago

sophia77 in Parlin, New Jersey said: thanx for ur reply,..
I was thinking to take this fall sem off to complete my pre-req for pharmacy and then comtinue with my last sem of nursing next year spring. It was cuz I want to apply for a pharmacy school next year. It is a 3 year long program, but really expensive. I am not much interested into nursing, and master will take a long way including the experience that I need to get into masters. Do you think in terms of job for pharmacists, its gonna continue like that?

Yes. Jobs now are very scarce in the NW. Pressure is on to fill scipts very rapidly. Choose another career option unless you want to live in a very very small town.

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Liloo in Trenton, New Jersey

60 months ago

Alexandra in San Diego, California said: I have been helping my mom search for an alternative job in pharmacy. She no longer has her license as a pharmacist, but has 30 years of experience. Is there any careers in the pharmacy feild that she could work in. I am having trouble with this and desperately need some guidance.
Thank You,
Alexandra

Did you get some real advice?

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John in Lake Zurich, Illinois

60 months ago

Do you guys think that this field will be saturated by 2016? 2016 is when i will be graduating if i decide to pursue pharmacy.

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omoplata66 in Bothell, Washington

60 months ago

John in Lake Zurich, Illinois said: Do you guys think that this field will be saturated by 2016? 2016 is when i will be graduating if i decide to pursue pharmacy.

Go to medical school, ARNP, PA-C, if healthcare is your choice. Pharmacy is already saturated and gettting worse.

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modell23 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

60 months ago

kirs in Vancouver, Washington said: I graduated in 2007 and have had the same retail experience as most of you have described.. with the occasional robbery! I felt frustrated with working evenings and weekends.. I am now working in mail order.. which I find very boring, but its a day job and much less stressful. I spent time looking at other careers and was considering a PA license.. the program is 1 year and would probably not be too difficult to get in after having a pharmacist license. I am also considering a residency, but am unsure of the hospital pharmacist needs in my area.. I can't believe how dissapointed I am with my degree..

Amazing we sing the same song. I graduated in 2003 though. What a waste. PA is a 2yr masters program. Lets get in asap b4 PA gets saturated as well.

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nfm in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

60 months ago

PharmD in Parsippany, New Jersey said: I was fired from a large retail phamacy in New York a month ago by a witch of a DM
I think they are trying to unload their older pharmacist I worked for them for a year and a half without incident then this new DM
absolutely created the worst envirnonment and use so called company policies to write you up --she wrote you up for not answering the phones within 3 rings, and when there was a custome complaint even if the customer was totally out of line you got written up (eg following state laws)
I have a PharmD from Rutgers 2007 before that stay at home mom and didn't practice for over 8 years then divorce brought me back into the field==
I can't believe how unprofessional some of these new managers have become I know of another pharmcist who is getting sick bc she is being harrassed by this same manager (she is also older) Has anyone else felt discriminated against due to age by these large retail companies?

YES

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omo in Snohomish, Washington

60 months ago

nfm in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania said: YES

I think pharmacist should unionize, then some of the issues would be taken care of. Does anyone know if that is already happening? The chains love to have that "3 phone ring" policy. They are so afraid of any patient comments that they have departed from reality.

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kieunhulopato5 in Santa Ana, California

60 months ago

I am college student. I am studying for biochemistry mayjor, and then I think about Pharmacy school.I see Pharmacy is not still good today and in future, so I want to change my mind to Medical school. Could you tell me Pharmacy or Medical school is better? Because It takes a long time to become a doctor, so I want to make sure my decision is right between Pharmacy and Medical school.Thank you.

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Dr Phil in Florence, Alabama

60 months ago

I am a pharmacist practicing retail for 30 years. The market for pharmacists is slim now and cannot believe it any better in the near future. We just found out that CVS Caremark ( a mail order facility ) in Birmingham,AL is closing and that will dump another 90 pharmacists all at once to the market. Be glad if you have a job because supply and demand will eventually drive salary's lower even if you can find a position. I would not recommend pharmacy school now - perhaps take another look in 10 years.

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omo in Snohomish, Washington

60 months ago

Agreed. Look at PA-C, ARNP, DO or MD programs. These will be much harder to replace with out-sourcing, and robots/mail order.

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purple76 in Smyrna, Delaware

60 months ago

please do not go to pharmacy school.

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omo in Snohomish, Washington

59 months ago

How is the job market in Delaware?

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purple76 in Smyrna, Delaware

59 months ago

For the person who asked about the market in Delaware, I would say that most feel obligated to stay put despite the difficulties because there is just not much out here to swish to. Jumping from chain to chain is not worth it anymore. It seems like you will encounter the same stuff. The market is saturated here.

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JMPharmD in Lewisville, Texas

59 months ago

I just graduated last year, got a job as a staff pharmacist. I had no problem getting a job...

Yes I realize if I wanted to stay in dallas/houston/austin the areas are a big harder to get a job, but if your willing to travel to areas outside the big cities you should have no problem.

Pharmacy is a great profession, pays well.

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Panacea in East Lansing, Michigan

59 months ago

I am Foreign Pharmacy graduate and very recently I got my FPGEC certificate. Currently I am looking for Pharmacy internship (1500hrs), if any one wants to help or has any suggestion on where or how to get it - please respond.
Thanx.

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omo in Snohomish, Washington

59 months ago

Texas seems to have more jobs at the moment, but that is not the case for much of the country from my research. Yes there are jobs in rural locations, but those will also dry up(although more slowly) too.

I also predict a jump in the number of pay freezes, or pay reductions in the next couple of years based on pharmacist supply. I am already making 4$ less per hour than I did 2 years ago. And there were eight pharmacists that applied for the position that I got.

Having worked for chain pharmacies for many years(20), I see them now flexing their muscles even more and putting an increased amount of pressure on their pharmacists. It only makes sense since they know that there is someone else who will quickly take their place if they can't keep up with a huge volume of prescriptions.

It would be nice to hear some other comments from pharmacists around the country in different states to see how their job markets are holding up.

JMPharmD in Lewisville, Texas said: I just graduated last year, got a job as a staff pharmacist. I had no problem getting a job...

Yes I realize if I wanted to stay in dallas/houston/austin the areas are a big harder to get a job, but if your willing to travel to areas outside the big cities you should have no problem.

Pharmacy is a great profession, pays well.

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omo in Snohomish, Washington

59 months ago

kieunhulopato5 in Santa Ana, California said: I am college student. I am studying for biochemistry mayjor, and then I think about Pharmacy school.I see Pharmacy is not still good today and in future, so I want to change my mind to Medical school. Could you tell me Pharmacy or Medical school is better? Because It takes a long time to become a doctor, so I want to make sure my decision is right between Pharmacy and Medical school.Thank you.

First, make sure you are picking your field of interest. The medical field in general has many similarities. I stick by my current beliefs that you should try to get as high up the "food chain" as possible. This means a position with prescribing power, if that is MD to you- make sure you really, REALLY want that.

Other great options are: ARNP, PA-C. PA-C programs are only about 2 years post B.S./B.A. degrees. I would probably choose that if I could go back in time. Although ARNP's have much more control over their practice.
In my area, I believe 85K per year is an average they make- although some make more or less. I also believe pharmacist salaries will drop based on the supply and demand.

If you choose pharmacy, make sure you do a residency and specialize in hospital pharmacy. Hospital pharmacy seems to have a few more jobs that I can see than retail, although less than in the past.

Good luck, it's a big decision! But remember, you can always do something totally different- just keep an open mind to the possiblities.

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20 years in Miami Beach, Florida

59 months ago

I'm approaching 20 years as a pharmacist. I choose hospital since I disliked both my internships in a retail chain and a small independent pharmacy. Throughout my career, many hospital in NYC had a huge shortage of pharmacist because the chains were hiring all the new pharmacists. Hopsital also pay a lot lower than retail but ~10 years ago, hospital started getting competetive with retail, still lower than the chains by ~$10K but not the ridiculous $25K+ difference. Hospital is just as demaiding and stressful as retail but I find it more satisfying depending on the hospital and area of practice. Since I went back for my PharmD, I spoke with the new graduates and I can't believe the loans they owe; a few were over $180K!!! Many new grads said they'll go to chains just for the money. I almost meet some working retail pharmacists in my PharmD program who were getting their PharmD so they can get into hospitals.
As for the last poster comments, it's true about TX. I have a friend that works retail for almost 20 years and she reolocated to an undesireable town in Texas to work for one of the big chain because they offer her so much money; she gets $15 per hour more than me plus overtime if I am lucky enough to work just 40 hours (I'm salaried). She had to endured 3 horrible years (she wanted to break her contract many times) but she made a lot of money and since her contract was up, she relocated to a desireable city in Texas to have her QOL now. My salary never came close to my friends who went into retail but it's something I knew when I chose hospital. I recently found out, my present salary is what they made over 7-10 years ago so I do wonder what happen if I went retail. Overall, I think I would make the same choice since I never once woke up and did not want to go to work even though all my hospital jobs were extremely stressful. Since I relocated to FL, my most stressful days are like an average day in NYC. No comparison between NYC and FL, work, people and QOL

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omo in Bothell, Washington

59 months ago

Anonther USA option would be to take a 2 year PA-C program. I am not sure, but by the time you get done with the pharmacy requirements in Canada or the USA, it might be more than a year anyway- so you could just enroll in a PA-C program.

PA-C's are practioners that work under MD's and do many similar tasks. Curently they are in good demand with good pay. The classes should be relatively easier for you with your current training in pharmacy.

The problem with pharmacy is that the service has been tied to a product for a dispensing fee. While a lot of effort has been made to prove the pharmacist worth in healthcare, not much progress has been made to get paid for cognitive services, and insurance paid claims have continued to shrink the profit margins.

I have been a pharmacist for close to 20 years, and the industry has been working on this a LONG TIME. The industry has not advanced much in my opinion and mail order and 4$ Walmart prescription programs have really damaged the profession and profit margins as a whole.

Canada might still be a good pharmacy option for you, however I believe that there will also be less pharmacy jobs there soon. My reason is this:Many Canada pharmacist have moved to the USA upon graduating in the past to make more money than they could in Canada. This trend will change and they will start staying in Canada now. Pharmacy graduates(like yourself) in other countries will also start to choose Canada too because there is less work in the USA for them currently.

I hope this was helpful to some extent to you, and I wish you the best of luck. Seriously consider a graduate degree like an MBA, PA-C, program to separate yourself from the pack. If you do stay with pharmacy, get as much hospital experience as you can because there are a few jobs there that I have seen.

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omo in Bothell, Washington

59 months ago

lore2400 in Mooresville, North Carolina said: I graduated from pharmacy school in 2008 and still have not found a job in pharmacy. Since I entered pharmacy school, so many more schools have popped up because of the "demand." Just like other posts have said, the schools won't tell you that there is no longer a demand for pharmacists. Yes, pharmacists get paid well, but you only get paid if you have a job. I have a huge amount of debt ($20,000/year=$80,000++) and no way to pay it off. Many sites claim studies show that the need for pharmacists is rising, and is one of the best professions to go into. I don't know where they are getting their information from-probably just the fact that the baby-boomers are aging. If they ask pharmacists, they would disagree. If you are looking at other avenues, I'd highly recommend those. Any suggestions for someone like me, a PharmD with an undergraduate Biology degree?? At this point, money is not as big an issue. I need something!!

My best advice for you, is that you need to really consider a move to a new rural area. In some small towns you are more likely to find a job in pharmacy. But it will be a sacrifice. Look at other states, Texas seems to have a few more jobs than other states like yours. Once you have a job, keep your rent(get a room-mate) and bills as low as possible and pay down those loans in half at least within a year. Another option would be to look for work ar a drug company or insurance company, but the pay will be less. However you might just like your job better.

Good luck!

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TXPharmacist in Austin, Texas

59 months ago

I am in the process of looking for a pharmacist position in Austin, TX and learning that there are virtually none available. Was wondering if anyone would shed some light on the availability of floater pharmacist positions.....the good, the bad and the ugly parts of the job. Is it fairly easy to get a floater position with the big retail chains like Walgreens, CVS, HEB, Target etc?

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jchristensen66@yahoo.com in Bothell, Washington

59 months ago

Austin is probably very popular. My suggestion is to look further out and get a solid position before the next wave of graduates arrive next year. That way maybe you can get seniority for when the more coveted postions arise.

Floating can be tuff. Some people like it, and it is a good way to becoame a stronger pharmacist. You get a chance to see how others do things and learn from them. Also, it might build some credibility within your company and again develop seniority. My only problem with it is that whats available now, will probably be more than next year after the next class graduates, so it might be better to consider a single store further out. But it's tuff to guess.

Good luck, it is also difficult to find pharmacist work here in the large metro's of the Northwest.

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unemployed in Brewster, Massachusetts

59 months ago

I graduated with a PharmD a year ago. Top 15% of my class. Did a one year hospital pharmacy residency and now unemployed. Sad. Please do not go into pharmacy.

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Omo in Bothell, Washington

59 months ago

I am sorry to hear that. Where do you live?

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modell23 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

59 months ago

you should consider moving out of MA. With a residency you should not be unemployed. Pack up and move if possible. OMG. I will die for a residency under my belt. The sky's the limit.

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yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

59 months ago

It is bad and will get worse, believe me! So much for the "manufactured" shortage! Blame the greedy schools!

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Omo in Bothell, Washington

59 months ago

I bet the chains also had their hand in it too. After all, now they can start reducing salaries, make the staff work in difficult situations that we have less influence to change than before.

Anyone know if the schools/organizations have a plan to correct their error of over-supply?

I wonder if creating a union would offer any leverage for pharmacist now?

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modell23 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

59 months ago

Don't be disappointed "students studying pharmacy". We are in a recession even though economists say we've been out for the past 15 months. Corporations need to recover financially so they cut down on variable costs like employees salaries. With that said, there's a freeze on hiring. I bet you 4 years from now things would change for the better. The baby boomers are retiring and with age comes health issues etc. Not wishing for poor health for anyone but stay positive, you would gain employment. Just try not to get fixated on practicing in one aspect of pharmacy.

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condorcarol in Newton, New Jersey

59 months ago

we should have a walk out day across the nations
we should definitely unionize

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condorcarol in Newton, New Jersey

59 months ago

New Jersey

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omo in Bothell, Washington

59 months ago

Maybe the best impact for a walk-out would be the Pharmacy school students. That would bring attention to the organizations that are most at fault for the supply issue. The Universities have acted poorly in their planning and need to address this issue ASAP.

Right now, all the Universities are doing is counting their money, as more students enroll. It is very upsetting to hear of all the new graduates having HUGE student loans, and finding it very difficult to
find work.

They deserve better.

If you are a graduate of a pharmacy school, email the school department and let them know of your concerns and difficulties. Skip donations if you participate in this regard. If you are a student, organize a group for a walk out to protest the current market saturation and concern of finding work upon graduation and student loan burden.

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purple76 in Newark, Delaware

59 months ago

I think retail pharmacists should organize a walk out for better treatment. At my retail pharmacy, conditions are so bad it is so disappointing to see professional being treated like this. Corporate needs to know that we won't stand for less than optimum work conditions despite the economy. We are still professionals. Every body that I talk to is unhappy and stuck so we have to fight back.

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Omo in Bothell, Washington

59 months ago

I like the idea, but I also think for the best protection it should be under a Union organization.

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