I have a few questions....HELP.

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tlh0112 in Fairmont, West Virginia

55 months ago

For some reason I cannot find any chapters in my books that pertain to syringe sizes. I only have a few questions left before I'm done with all my classes and I need help answering them. My brain is racked right now. I have answers for some but I'd like to double check they are right before I turn them in and have to do them over!

A. A patient needs a 125 mcg dose. Use the 50mcg/ml vial.
a. How much is needed for the dose?
b. What size syringe is needed?

B. A patient needs 800mg for use in an IV. Use the 100mg/ml vial.
a. How much is needed for the dose?
b. What size syringe is needed?

C. A patient needs 3300mg for an IVPB. Use the 330mg/ml vial.
a. How much is needed for the dose?
b. What size syringe is needed?

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Rak in Mendham, New Jersey

55 months ago

tlh0112 in Fairmont, West Virginia said: For some reason I cannot find any chapters in my books that pertain to syringe sizes. I only have a few questions left before I'm done with all my classes and I need help answering them. My brain is racked right now. I have answers for some but I'd like to double check they are right before I turn them in and have to do them over!

A. A patient needs a 125 mcg dose. Use the 50mcg/ml vial.
a. How much is needed for the dose?
b. What size syringe is needed?

B. A patient needs 800mg for use in an IV. Use the 100mg/ml vial.
a. How much is needed for the dose?
b. What size syringe is needed?

C. A patient needs 3300mg for an IVPB. Use the 330mg/ml vial.
a. How much is needed for the dose?
b. What size syringe is needed?

A a: 2.5 ml
B a : 8 ml
C a. 10 ml

Depending on options avaialble, will select the syringe size.

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tlh0112 in Fairmont, West Virginia

55 months ago

thank you. I was pretty sure I had the right answers but nowhere in any of my stuff does it give me syringe sizes!

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Rak in Mendham, New Jersey

55 months ago

tlh0112 in Fairmont, West Virginia said: thank you. I was pretty sure I had the right answers but nowhere in any of my stuff does it give me syringe sizes!

I will get back to you if i have any notes on it.

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Rak in Mendham, New Jersey

55 months ago

tlh0112 in Fairmont, West Virginia said: thank you. I was pretty sure I had the right answers but nowhere in any of my stuff does it give me syringe sizes!

Here is something i got from some book regarding syringes

if you dispense a 1.5 ml dose,
choose a 3 ml syringe, not a 5 ml syringe. A 1 ml dose should be dispensed
in a 1 ml syringe. The reason for this is that the larger the syringe,
the less accurate the markings.The accuracy of a syringe
is also proportional to its volume, so you should always measure volumes
in the closest size of syringe.

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Rak in Mendham, New Jersey

55 months ago

tlh0112 in Fairmont, West Virginia said: thank you. I was pretty sure I had the right answers but nowhere in any of my stuff does it give me syringe sizes!

Read this one too
The syringe for injection is made of sterile plastic and is made to accommodate
a needle. In contrast the oral syringe, which is not sterile, does not
accommodate a needle. It is made for oral dosing, as discussed previously.
The sterile syringe is calibrated, with the type of calibrations depending
on the size of the syringe: a 0.5 ml syringe is calibrated in increments
of 0.005 ml, a 1 ml syringe (tuberculin, or TB syringe) in 0.01 ml, and the
larger sizes (3, 5, and 10 ml) in 0.1 ml . A syringe is only
accurate to the smallest calibration. When a syringe is used, the amount
of solution drawn up is measured by the first black line (nearest the
plunger tip) made by the side of the plunger, not the rubber cone that
extends into the solution . Again, solutions should be as
close to room temperature as possible (without harming the drug) before
measuring, to avoid errors in measurement.

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tlh0112 in Fairmont, West Virginia

55 months ago

Ah thank you, this helped very much.

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tlh0112 in Fairmont, West Virginia

55 months ago

A patient needs 200mg of chemotherapy. Use the hazardous liquid vial.

a. How much is needed for this dose?
b. What precautions are necessary for chemotherapy agents?
(the bottle says: hazardous liquid 50mg/ml)

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Rak in Mendham, New Jersey

55 months ago

tlh0112 in Fairmont, West Virginia said: A patient needs 200mg of chemotherapy. Use the hazardous liquid vial.

a. How much is needed for this dose?
b. What precautions are necessary for chemotherapy agents?
(the bottle says: hazardous liquid 50mg/ml)

a. Since 1 ml contains 50 mg
hence x ml equals 200 mg
i .e x X 50 = 200
x = 4 ml

b. Many
injectable drugs, such as cancer chemotherapeutics and steroid drugs, can
be harmful to the person handling them. So, in addition to keeping the
drug sterile, as described above, the technician must wear protective
clothing. This includes clothing that covers the body: no shorts, shortsleeved
shirts, or skirts should be worn. In addition, a long protective coat
(lab coat) should be worn to protect the clothing and person, and safety
glasses or goggles should be worn to protect the eyes. Safety glasses
should have splash guards on the sides, because when a drug is diluted within a vial, the pressure within the vial may build up, causing the drug
to splash out if the vial is opened.
These coverings are for the protection of the technician, not the drug:
they do not help to keep the drug sterile. If the drug is hazardous, the
technician should also wear additional disposable body coverings such
as a hat, mask, gloves, and shoe covers. This not only helps to prevent
the drug from touching the skin but helps prevent contaminating the
other parts of the pharmacy with the drug, as the coverings can be
removed at the door of the IV room and discarded. When working with
a sterile drug, particularly one that is hazardous, care should be taken to
keep hands at least six inches inside of the hood, away from other parts
of the body .

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