BA in Exercise Science for PTA?

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Terry in Salinas, California

75 months ago

Having a BS in exercise science is helpful to this extent. Some states DO NOT require you to go to PTA school. If you have a bachelors degree in kinesiology or similar, and have taken the required courses that are the same as in a PTA program, you may be able to challenge the boards provided that you have the essential amount of full time hours with at least 18 months in an acute setting.

For instance, a person who has a BS in ATC or CSCS that has not gone to a PTA school, can challenge the boards (depending on the state) if he has the required courses and number of work hours. California allows this. Check your own state.

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u in Lakeland, Florida

69 months ago

Aphex in Falls Church, Virginia said: A B.S. in exercise science can't replace an A.A.S in PTA. Exercise science is not physical therapy. Exercise is only one aspect of physical therapy, while in a PTA program you will learn many other physical therapy interventions. You still can work as a physical therapy aide which does not require any licensure. I'm a second year PTA student, and many of my classmates have a B.S. in exercise science. A B.S. is not always "superior" to an associates degree, as some B.S. degrees are totally useless, while some associate degrees provide much better value such as PTA, RN, ...et.

A bachelors degree in exercise science is definately superior and requires more work and intelligence than an AA degree for PTA. I have a bacehlors degree in biology and finishing in a PTA program. Its not that the AA is superior. Its just a required program to prepare the student to work as a PTA.

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Future PTA in Seattle, Washington

58 months ago

You were giving the other person personal career advice, but in his head Mike heard an attack on his profession. Mike's just upset because he got the wrong degree. Why else would somebody keep coming back to a forum that is a totally separate field from their chosen profession?

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Dad of 3 in Brunswick, Georgia

57 months ago

chris in Chicago, Illinois said: Totally online... no. There are hybrid programs though. Classes are online the usually two weekends a month you visit the school and test.

My career in real estate shattered after 8 years due to the ecominic crisis. Unfortunately I'm having ot start over with 3 little mouths to feed. I started taking courses online at Everest in Criminal Justice. I'm halfway through with the first semester and want to change to PT, I feel more suited to help people. PTA salary would be simply OK for a while, but I really want to go all the way. Naturally I would prefer to do this online. I appreciate the link that was posted for the accredited schools. I've looked through some of them and one of the closest ones are South college in Sav, GA for PTA and Armstrong in Sav, GA for PT.

Here's my delema. OK I have a few obviously, I have just found out that my unemployment was approved and want to make the best out of it. I've never had the chance to go to college and not have to work, so this is a blessing straight from God. I feel I can take this on. I just don't want to have to travel much due to gas prices. My family had to make a lot of sacrifices and I never want to go through that again. So I have 89 weeks left to work with. After that I need to have employment to survive. Any suggestions? Can someone help me figure this out? I don't want to waste another semester.

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MR in Alabaster, Alabama

57 months ago

Medicare is insolvent. The medical field, including PT will change drastically. If you can't survive, with a family, on PTA current salary you need to pursue the degree. You are looking at three years for a PTA degree, starting from scratch and 7 plus for DPT degree. A PTA may bring home as much as 60K begining. The degree is very cheap compared to DPT and investment is great, right now. That is quickly changing, probably by the end of this year. Salaries will drop. Find something you love and do it. If you are focused on the money only, you are in trouble.

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shahdeep in Toronto, Ontario

57 months ago

Hi, I am just wondering. If you have a 4 year degree, then why would you be interested in becoming a PTA? I am from Ontario, Canada and I am currently in a 2 year PTA/OTA diploma program. I will be finishing in April 2013. And I want to get into Kinesiology once I graduate. But for someone who already has a 4 yr degree, why would you be looking into becoming a PTA? I am sure there is a genuine reason behind you choosing this but I was just wondering if you could suggest me anything that might be helpful to me. By the way, I am planning to move to USA, don't know which state but I heard that there is a good opportunity for PTAs but we need to obtain a license there. SO if you could help me out, I will really appreciate it. Thanks.

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Chris in Chicago, Illinois

57 months ago

Maybe they got the four year first before deciding. Maybe the wanted to finish it before getting into practice as a PTA. Maybe they want an edge on the competition. Maybe they have a business or accounting degree and want to manage.

What state... everywhere. But I see Arizona.California as good options.

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Alicia in Springfield, Missouri

56 months ago

Is it likely to get into a PTA program without a bachelor's? I am about to finish up my first year at a 4-year college. I decided I don't want to go for a Doctorate in Physical Therapy. Only my math and English classes will transfer for the pre-reqs. I took a biomedical science class instead of Biology and it doesn't transfer.
What is the average wait list time?
Is there a similar Bachelor's program to PTA?

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Alicia in Springfield, Missouri

56 months ago

Is it likely to get into a PTA program without a bachelor's? I am about to finish up my first year at a 4-year college. I decided I don't want to go for a Doctorate in Physical Therapy. Only my math and English classes will transfer for the pre-reqs. I took a biomedical science class instead of Biology and it doesn't transfer.
What is the average wait list time?
Is there a similar Bachelor's program to PTA?

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besam94 in Clearwater, Florida

56 months ago

Alicia in Springfield, Missouri said: Is it likely to get into a PTA program without a bachelor's? I am about to finish up my first year at a 4-year college. I decided I don't want to go for a Doctorate in Physical Therapy. Only my math and English classes will transfer for the pre-reqs. I took a biomedical science class instead of Biology and it doesn't transfer.
What is the average wait list time?
Is there a similar Bachelor's program to PTA?

You do not need a Bachelors degree to get into a PTA program...only thing you'll need to have accomplished are the required pre-reqs for the program. This usually means A&P I and II, algebra or higher math, english I and II, public speaking, some sort of psychology, some sort of philosophy or ethics, and possibly a chemistry course. the specifics will vary from school to school but for the most part thats wjat you'll need.

Wait list time varies from school to school as well. It may be a longer wait time for a public school. I applied to my program in 2010 and was wait listed 2 years...I'm finally starting this August.

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Colette in Springfield, Missouri

56 months ago

What have you done the past 2 year while on the wait list?

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manbesammartinez in Tampa, Florida

55 months ago

Colette in Springfield, Missouri said: What have you done the past 2 year while on the wait list?

Worked. Also, since applying way back when the school has changed some of the admissions criteria and added som pre-reqs that I didnt have. So although I was admitted i still needed to accomplish some additional coursework. Three classes I needed were ethics, pharmacology, and medical terminology. I've completed all but medical terminology which I will get done over the summer, before starting the program August.

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manbesammartinez in Tampa, Florida

55 months ago

worked.

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Jennnifer in Boynton Beach, Florida

53 months ago

PTA in Enola, Pennsylvania said: Going into PTA school with an exercise science degree would put you way ahead of the class, but there is still a tremendous amount of therapy to learn. Food for thought... do you know the which muscles control the descent of the lower extremity in end swing phase? Or how the golgi tendon organ affects the muscle spindle during quick stretch? How to test for joint stability? It is not an A.A.S to be taken lightly. Anyone who has earned their license, has EARNED it.

Actually I learned that and more earning my degree in Exercise science. So yes, having that degree would put you ahead of your classmates.

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PTA in Towson, Maryland

51 months ago

CAJ17,

I don't know if you completed your pre-req's for a DPT program or PTA yet, but I'd lean towards DPT. If you go for a PTA license you will not get any more money with your degrees, you will get what they would pay an entry level grad. As far as getting into the program, your grade point avg in the pre-req's is a main qualifier in the competition to get accepted. They also look at observation time and clinical experience. You have good experience as trainer so that may help. Make sure your grades are on par.

Margem63,

Many DPT's elect to do exercise science for their BS. If she sees herself going into Outpatient care that may be an option. The only problem is that jobs and pay aren't the best with that degree. I would personally do a biology degree and that may open up better job opportunities in research if desired. If she is a gym rat than exer science may be better. Getting a bio degree also would set her up for many pre-req's to other medical post grad degrees. If she is young it is a no brainer to go for her DPT. She will need to maintain good grades and I recommend her working as a rehab tech to get experience.

If she went for a PTA degree, yes, she would have to start from scratch. She would have to first get a bachelors degree and then a DPT. Also, if she did the PTA first, it is pretty rare one will go back to get their DPT. Almost all DPT programs are full time during the day. It sounds like she is young. I'd say let her enjoy college, no need to rush college with a 2 year AA degree. Let her enjoy the experience.

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margem63 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

51 months ago

PTA, Towson Marlyand -
Thank you. That was very helpful. She is just a juinor in HIgh School but we are beginning to plan out our next steps. She is currently in a technical High School studying Health Care Rehab. She is pretty sure she wants to follow this course, but last year she wanted to in radio, so go figure. I was just afraid that after 4 years and a bachelor degree, what if she didn't want to carry on with DPT. She says she would also like to be a PE teacher e if she leans so maybe if she leans toward exercise science tnhat would be more be a better backup

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Joseph in Houston, Texas

48 months ago

I'd appreciate help on this ossue. I earned a BA in Pol Sci last year, got accepted to grad school for Spring 13. My fiancee and I are at the most critical time of our blessed lives and we agreed that one of us has to venture into Physical Therapy to secure our future financially and for our business plans in Out-patient rehabilitation...etc.

We've worked as a PT Aides for a while so we understand the field. From my observation, PTA's are always occupied with work, and that's good for its equals more money IMO.

Here's my dilenma; My fiancee just got a breakthrough in Oil & Gas, and she's also starting grad skl by January so I decided to be the one to pursue PT which I love and she decided to sponsor my tuition too. If you're in my shoes, would you

1. Go for the PTA program with a bachelors degree? This is faster and would cost less money then transition to DPT later because i already have a BA?
2. Go for a DPT? More expensive and time consuming, but more reputable?

Thanks in advance.

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Jacob in Gulf Breeze, Florida

48 months ago

If you actually look at the curriculum for almost all DPT programs they are only one semester longer than a PTA program. The only reason it is longer in the beginning is because you have to have a Bachelor's Degree to be able to get into a DPT program. Since you already have your Bachelors Degree it would be pretty much idiotic not to apply for a Physical Therapy program. The program might be more expensive but as a Physical Therapist you make a lot more more than the PTA. If you prefer to be the PTA than go for it, but they get stuck with all the hard work and less pay.

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sptarandyj in Hoffman Estates, Illinois

47 months ago

DPT program is "only" 3 yrs long, but it is a total of 150 semester credit hrs. PTA program is 2yrs long, but it is only 40 semester credit hrs plus about 25 hrs of prereqs. DPT students learn a lot about eval and manipulation, but the curiculum about therapeutic exercises and activities are the same.

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Kfizzle88 in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

46 months ago

u in Lakeland, Florida said: A bachelors degree in exercise science is definately superior and requires more work and intelligence than an AA degree for PTA. I have a bacehlors degree in biology and finishing in a PTA program. Its not that the AA is superior. Its just a required program to prepare the student to work as a PTA.

It definately or definitely requires more intelligence? Just wondering...It is or isn't more superior? That's definately why you had to go back to school to get a job.

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bluelineman in McKinney, Texas

46 months ago

To be a PTA you have to have an associates in PTA. Most employers dont care about any other degrees. Its the state license that means more than anything else. You cant do any harm getting an advanced degree, but its not necessary.

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Vince in Schwenksville, Pennsylvania

46 months ago

jagelsj in Bellingham, Washington said: So if you have a four year degree in the health care field will it be easier to have the general classes such as anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, biomechanics, psychology, ect. transfer so you do not have to take them over again and just take the core classes to get a PTA

I found that after 10 years , the science and math class don't transfer.

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Devin in Logan, Utah

45 months ago

Hello I have found this forum extremely useful and I would appreciate any advice to my personal situation. I am currently pursuing a degree in exercise science, I started volunteering hours as a pt aide and assured myself that physical therapy is the career path I want to take. I have not made significant progress in my degree but I have a 3.8 gpa and I am thinking about dropping everything with my bachelors degree in exercise science and just going strait for the requirements to get into PTA school. I want to get in, get my license and land a stable job. But here is my problem... I don't want to be a PTA forever I eventually want to become a PT and have my own practice... Would it be worth it to go through PTA school and then after I get experience as a PTA complete more classes to eventually go to PT school ? Is it even possible to be taking classes while being a PTA ?

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anna in Chicago, Illinois

44 months ago

mil in Ronkonkoma, New York said: u need to go through with a pta program....

HI,
I need help i lack 1yr deficit in PT Degree for new york state ,where can i take that plz reply me

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Chris in Newark, Delaware

43 months ago

Devin,

I'm in a similar situation. I was pursuing a medical laboratory science degree. Unfortunately I have a low gpa at 2.7 and I realized after starting the program that I hate lab work and I love working with people. I realized I want to get into physical therapy so I took some time off from my university classes to take the prereqs for the pta program. I recently got accepted and am leaving the university to start the pta program in the fall. I'm starting the program to get experience and a decent salary before applying to DPT school. In your case with your high gpa, I would continue your degree and keep your grades up, then apply to PT school. The only reason I'm not is because I fear I won't get in with my low gpa. Go for the DPT.

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anajones in Gaithersburg

43 months ago

Hi Everybody! Hope all is well. Anybody who is interested in finding a part time job or another job? Our company is willing to help.

-Ana

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Brian in Delaware, Ohio

42 months ago

I know some of these posts are older, but I thought I would give my 2 cents. A BS in exercise science is not very helpful in my opinion. I have a BS in exercise science, and am also a PTA. While some things are useful, I have not seen any employers really care that I have a BS. I must state as well, I personally believe the PTA program was more difficult than the Exercise Science degree I have. I think the word "Assistant" in our title give people a preconceived notion of the education level, as well as it being only 2 years that it is an easy program. However, its an intense 2 years and there are many aspects to physical therapy besides just exercise.
Brian K BS,PTA,LMT,CSCS,CKTP

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Brian in Delaware, Ohio

42 months ago

Devin in Logan, Utah said: Hello I have found this forum extremely useful and I would appreciate any advice to my personal situation. I am currently pursuing a degree in exercise science, I started volunteering hours as a pt aide and assured myself that physical therapy is the career path I want to take. I have not made significant progress in my degree but I have a 3.8 gpa and I am thinking about dropping everything with my bachelors degree in exercise science and just going strait for the requirements to get into PTA school. I want to get in, get my license and land a stable job. But here is my problem... I don't want to be a PTA forever I eventually want to become a PT and have my own practice... Would it be worth it to go through PTA school and then after I get experience as a PTA complete more classes to eventually go to PT school ? Is it even possible to be taking classes while being a PTA ?

Devin, just go for the DPt, especially if you do not want to be a PTA forever. There are 2 programs in the country that have a PTA to DPT program, ones in Ohio, the other in California I think. Otherwise, I would just go for the DPT. You would increase your chances to get accepted if you did your undergrad in athletic training (ATC)
Brian BS,PTA,LMT,CSCS,CKTP

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jzing in Denver, Colorado

41 months ago

To answer your question. I am a practicing PTA and if your goal it to go to PT school I would finish your Bachelors in exercise science. Why I say this is because the PTA degree is not a stepping stone to eventually bridging into being a PT. As of right now APTA might turn the PTA degree into a bachelors after they make their decision in 2014 whether or not it would be worth the cost and time of the students. You need a bachelors and have to meet the core requirements to get into DPT school and as of right now there is only one bridge program in Ohio that offers PTA to DPT. I hope that this helps a little bit with coming up with your decision. I do hope they eventually turn the PTA into a bachelors and somehow work out a bridge from there to transitional programs to DPT. Best of luck with everything.

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rodly 89 in Orlando, Florida

26 months ago

i wanna go to PT SCHOOL I JUST HAVE MY AA degree should i do?

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rodly 89 in Orlando, Florida

26 months ago

rodleymoise1@gmail.com

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PTA, S.BSPTA in Denver, Colorado

26 months ago

rodly 89 in Orlando, Florida said: i wanna go to PT SCHOOL I JUST HAVE MY AA degree should i do?

Rodly 89 in Orlando, the first thing you should figure out is if you want to go to get your Doctorate in PT which is what is required now days to be a PT or if you want to become a PTA which is a Associate degree but is also offering a Bachelor degree level at some Colleges.

PT school requires that you have a bachelors with all the prerequisites required for entrance into that particular PT program and will last 3 years. Upon completion of the PT program you will hold a Doctorate in Physical Therapy.

PTA schools require most of the time that you interview and take a test before entrance into the program. The program will last anywhere from 2 years to 18 months if it's a fast track program. Upon completion you will hold an Associate of Occupational studies in Physical Therapist Assistant or an Associate of Applied Science in Physical Therapist Assistant. Some programs are starting to offer a Bachelors of Science in Physical Therapist Assistant but you have to have your AOS/AAS in PTA before entrance into these programs. It's almost set up much like an RN to BSN program.

With all that said it really depends on what part of PT you want to be involved in. Both the PT and PTA play a vital role in the treatments of patients with the PT doing the evaluations, setting up the plan of care, discharging. The PTA helps carry out the plan of care, can assess the patient to report back to the supervising PT. It's much like a Physician and Physician Assistant type role but I would recommend doing some research and shadowing to see which one fits your best.

Whether you decide to go to PT or PTA school you won't regret it. Only thing I would say about the PTA position is if you decide you want to transition into the PT role there is only one University in Ohio (Findlay) that offers PTA to PT position. This might change within the next 5 years though.

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vash in Mcdonough, Georgia

13 months ago

Well getting into a pt program is very competitive. Having a bachelors, and a pta under your belt will help if you really want to become a pt. Though there are other options to consider that do the same thing just about. Occupational therapy school is a lot easier to get into. But if you graduate with a lower gpa after going to a traditional college or university, why not try to rebuild yourself and put something else under your belt. PTA programs provide you with hands on training which is more than a bachelors in exercise science gives you.

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aekh in Lubbock, Texas

3 months ago

Would you recommend going for a DPT for someone who has a 4 year Bachelors in science of kinesiology degree ? Do you think it pays more than going for a Bachelors in science nursing degree ?

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PTA in Baltimore, Maryland

3 months ago

aekh in Lubbock, Texas said: Would you recommend going for a DPT for someone who has a 4 year Bachelors in science of kinesiology degree ? Do you think it pays more than going for a Bachelors in science nursing degree ?

I would do the RN degree after working at the largest hospital in the US for the last 4 years. If you are young, go DPT.

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courtneymae23 in Pennsylvania

1 month ago

Hi. I'm currently pursuing my bachelor's in exercise science and trying to figure out whether or not I should go for PTA or PT. From personal experience with rehab, I've seen a lot of what the PT and the PTA do. I'd like to have the hands on experience that I saw with a PTA, but also be financially stable. I'm only 21, but I really don't want to spend the money for the DPT and end up making almost the same amount as a PTA after taxes and all the other bullcrap costs. Nor do I want to go into DPT and realize that I don't like it. People have told me that they could see me becoming a good DPT, but I feel they're just saying that because they look at it from a money standpoint. I think that once I get my bachelor's I will take the strength and conditioning exam and be a strength coach. I'd also like to be certified as an Aquatic therapist or Water Safety Instructor. Also I feel that people look at me like I'm crazy because I want to go for an associate's instead of a doctorate. I know though that if some point I decide that I want to become a DPT, that I can take the pre requisite courses and go for it or go into a bride program in Ohio or even get a bachelor's as a PTA just to have some other form of higher education. It's tough because I don't want to make a huge mistake and I feel like the only people I can really ask are those who are currently or have previously been in the field.

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lgriffin in Lafayette, Louisiana

1 month ago

shahdeep in Toronto, Ontario said: Hi, I am just wondering. If you have a 4 year degree, then why would you be interested in becoming a PTA? I am from Ontario, Canada and I am currently in a 2 year PTA/OTA diploma program. I will be finishing in April 2013. And I want to get into Kinesiology once I graduate. But for someone who already has a 4 yr degree, why would you be looking into becoming a PTA? I am sure there is a genuine reason behind you choosing this but I was just wondering if you could suggest me anything that might be helpful to me. By the way, I am planning to move to USA, don't know which state but I heard that there is a good opportunity for PTAs but we need to obtain a license there. SO if you could help me out, I will really appreciate it. Thanks.

You need a 4 year a degree and a doctorate in physical therapy (about 3 years) to be a physical therapist. I have a four year degree and am looking for a job as a PTA. I didn't even know there was a 2 year degree specifically for PTA until recently.

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