BA in Exercise Science for PTA?

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mil in Ronkonkoma, New York

46 months ago

u need to go through with a pta program....

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Selton2k711 in Lubbock, Texas

46 months ago

So.... a bachelors degree, which is superior to an associates degree, doesn't work for PTA? Seriously?

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Aphex in Falls Church, Virginia

46 months ago

A B.S. in exercise science can't replace an A.A.S in PTA. Exercise science is not physical therapy. Exercise is only one aspect of physical therapy, while in a PTA program you will learn many other physical therapy interventions. You still can work as a physical therapy aide which does not require any licensure. I'm a second year PTA student, and many of my classmates have a B.S. in exercise science. A B.S. is not always "superior" to an associates degree, as some B.S. degrees are totally useless, while some associate degrees provide much better value such as PTA, RN, ...et.

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Terry in Salinas, California

46 months ago

Having a BS in exercise science is helpful to this extent. Some states DO NOT require you to go to PTA school. If you have a bachelors degree in kinesiology or similar, and have taken the required courses that are the same as in a PTA program, you may be able to challenge the boards provided that you have the essential amount of full time hours with at least 18 months in an acute setting.

For instance, a person who has a BS in ATC or CSCS that has not gone to a PTA school, can challenge the boards (depending on the state) if he has the required courses and number of work hours. California allows this. Check your own state.

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jagelsj in Bellingham, Washington

44 months ago

So if you have a four year degree in the health care field will it be easier to have the general classes such as anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, biomechanics, psychology, ect. transfer so you do not have to take them over again and just take the core classes to get a PTA

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HannahOHannah in Royal Oak, Michigan

44 months ago

@Jagelsj: ABSOLUTELY! Why would you take them over? However, some classes, such as A&P, expire after a few years. I know a few nursing students at my school who have been on the nursing waiting list for 3-4 years, so they had to retake their anatomy classes! This may differ from school to school, but it can happen.

Also, please remember that you still have to be ACCEPTED into a PTA program. You cannot just "take the core classes" if you haven't been formally accepted into the program.

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PTAStudent in Salisbury, Maryland

43 months ago

Terry in Salinas, California said: Having a BS in exercise science is helpful to this extent. Some states DO NOT require you to go to PTA school. If you have a bachelors degree in kinesiology or similar, and have taken the required courses that are the same as in a PTA program, you may be able to challenge the boards provided that you have the essential amount of full time hours with at least 18 months in an acute setting.

For instance, a person who has a BS in ATC or CSCS that has not gone to a PTA school, can challenge the boards (depending on the state) if he has the required courses and number of work hours. California allows this. Check your own state.

I have never heard this to be true. The APTA requires a student to graduate from a CAPTE accredited school, DPT or PTA prior to taking the boards. Not sure where you got this info.

Good luck to all who are pursuing a career in the field of PT!

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u in Lakeland, Florida

40 months ago

Aphex in Falls Church, Virginia said: A B.S. in exercise science can't replace an A.A.S in PTA. Exercise science is not physical therapy. Exercise is only one aspect of physical therapy, while in a PTA program you will learn many other physical therapy interventions. You still can work as a physical therapy aide which does not require any licensure. I'm a second year PTA student, and many of my classmates have a B.S. in exercise science. A B.S. is not always "superior" to an associates degree, as some B.S. degrees are totally useless, while some associate degrees provide much better value such as PTA, RN, ...et.

A bachelors degree in exercise science is definately superior and requires more work and intelligence than an AA degree for PTA. I have a bacehlors degree in biology and finishing in a PTA program. Its not that the AA is superior. Its just a required program to prepare the student to work as a PTA.

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Aphex in Falls Church, Virginia

39 months ago

u in Lakeland, Florida said: A bachelors degree in exercise science is definately superior and requires more work and intelligence than an AA degree for PTA. I have a bacehlors degree in biology and finishing in a PTA program. Its not that the AA is superior. Its just a required program to prepare the student to work as a PTA.

How do you know that "A bachelors degree in exercise science is definately superior and requires more work and intelligence than an AA degree for PTA"? you mentioned your B.S. is in Biology, not exercise science. Most of the PTA programs are extremely challenging. Many of my classmates have B.S. in exercise science and they all agree that the PTA program is definitely more challenging. The question is not what's more superior to what, but rather what is more value the rest, and in this case PTA's make way better wage than exercise specialists that have no license in most states.

Cheers

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chris in Oswego, Illinois

39 months ago

I'll tell ya, pretty funny. Let's all first look at the title of the post again... BA - Exercise Science.
Not BS. Any and all of us can even obtain that degree with distance learning. A good "add-on" to a PTA or ATC. If we look at a hierarchy, it's great for a personal trainer.
If there is only one program accreted that supports PTA to PT, why would they grant with no additional science coursework nor the needed hands on experience. To add, that degree is not even (ie:) human movement studies, Rehabilitation Science Nor Kinesiology. And those are really just the knowing the practices of movement and how to apply load or resistance. Prevention, therapy, orthopedics, treating injury, etc, etc is where with ES?
I'd say, take some NASM (the good classes) and CHEK courses do training while in a course of PTA or PT.
If it was pre-pt, you should have finished. Maybe with the last mentioned you can petition a schools board to grant entry.

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pta2011 in Syracuse, Indiana

38 months ago

Selton2k711 in Lubbock, Texas said: Hello, I am about a year out from graduating with a bachelors degree in exercise science (pre-pt). I decided not to go into PT postgrad, and am wondering if a bachelors in exercise science(pre-pt) is adequate to get licensed and hired as a physical therapist assistant? I keep reading that it requires at least an associates degree in science, so I would assume a 4 year degree would be much more appealing to employers.

To become a licensed pta you have to graduate from an accredited pta program. It is a requirement to apply for permission to sit for your boards. This can be verified at the otptat website.

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pta2011 in Syracuse, Indiana

38 months ago

Terry in Salinas, California said: Having a BS in exercise science is helpful to this extent. Some states DO NOT require you to go to PTA school. If you have a bachelors degree in kinesiology or similar, and have taken the required courses that are the same as in a PTA program, you may be able to challenge the boards provided that you have the essential amount of full time hours with at least 18 months in an acute setting.

For instance, a person who has a BS in ATC or CSCS that has not gone to a PTA school, can challenge the boards (depending on the state) if he has the required courses and number of work hours. California allows this. Check your own state.[/

To sit for the boards in ohio you must have an associates from an accredited program. There are 18 schools accredited currely.

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nkd0424 in New York, New York

36 months ago

Can anyone provide a list of schools in/near NYC that offer an Associates in PTA? I've looked at the list of accredited progams on the APTA website, but when I go to those schools websites indiviually, most of them seem to be just for your Masters or DPT (or an Associates in Occupational Therapy Assistant). Also, when you're applying for jobs, is it frowned upon if you got your PTA Associates online?
Thanks for any direction anyone can provide!

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Future PTA in Glendale, Arizona

36 months ago

All accredited PTA programs can be found here:

www.capteonline.org/Programs/

Click on the link that says "Accredited PTA programs". It lists them alphabetically by state.

As far as your online program question goes, the program needs to be on this list in order to be recognized. If it is, then it should be fine.

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Mike in Waterloo, Illinois

36 months ago

There are PTA schools completely online?

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Chris in Kokomo, Indiana

36 months ago

No.

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treads in Denver, Colorado

32 months ago

A Bachelors of Science and Bachelors of Art are only different because of the governing department. It does not mean one is less than the other. Take a look at some of the schools who offer degrees in Exercise Science and notice that both BA and BS have the same science requirements. Just depends on what school you chose and whether it is accredited. They even have a BS in Business and I am pretty sure they didn't have to take a whole lot of science.

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charlie in Irvine, California

30 months ago

Idk about this study. Correlation does not equal causation. Just because the students that are exercising more have higher grades doesn't mean that one is causing the other. When I was in school I noticed that a lot of the kids that got good grades also had an exercise regimen that they adhered to because they were already focused and driven people to begin with. i read an article the other day that said that kids that didn't exercise were more likely to do poorly in school, and the researchers thought that it was more the product of something they were predisposed to rather than a causal relationship (the article's at www.flattentummy.com if you want to read it)

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lilwuster10 in Milton, Florida

29 months ago

So if you receive your BS in Exercise Science and then go to PTA school would one not benefit the other? And if you have both degrees would that benefit you more when you are trying to get a job? And how much more money would you make if you have both of those degrees, instead of just having one?

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PTA in Enola, Pennsylvania

29 months ago

Going into PTA school with an exercise science degree would put you way ahead of the class, but there is still a tremendous amount of therapy to learn. Food for thought... do you know the which muscles control the descent of the lower extremity in end swing phase? Or how the golgi tendon organ affects the muscle spindle during quick stretch? How to test for joint stability? It is not an A.A.S to be taken lightly. Anyone who has earned their license, has EARNED it.

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lilwuster10 in Milton, Florida

29 months ago

I have applied for the PTA program, and I am very excited to be going into that field. However there is a decent length wait list to get into the program, so I have decided to get my Exercise Science Degree while I wait for the PTA program. But you are saying that it would not be pointless to have both degrees right?

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PTAstudent in Towson, Maryland

29 months ago

Lilwuster10,

Personally, I don't see the point in getting an exercise science degree if you are choosing to go into the field to be a PTA. That is an AA degree, you'd spend more money and time than you need too. Now if you are pursing a DPT degree that is a totally different story. I know the norm now is that some folks that have BS in Exer Science is becoming more common. This is because they don't want to spend the money or didn't get accepted into a DPT program. That is a lot more time that you don't need to do if you are only going for a PTA degree. It will not make you any more marketable or give you that much more of an edge in PTA school. They are very different. I will say that those including myself that have 4 year degrees tend to do better, I think it is solely because they know how to study and tend to be better test takers. If you think you know you want to go into an OP sports type setting the Exer Science degree might be beneficial, but if you become an ATC you can not use those credentials when working as a PTA. I will say that a business degree may be helpful if you ever want to move into a admin role, problem is PTA's rarely get management positions, because it would be odd overseeing a DPT. If you are pursuing a four year degree and you know you want to work with TBI or SCI's, than a biology and neuro-based degree would be better, especially if you are looking to go for your DPT. If you are able I recommend a DPT over a PTA degree anyday. More job security, money, autonomy, and opportunity. Way more job opportunities and less questions about where the field is headed as a PT. If you are a career changer and older, PTA is a quicker way into the field with less expense, but you hit a ceiling fast and opportunities are vastly lower. If you are seeking a BS degree I go ahead and go for the DPT, if not just get the PTA. I see no advantage as a PTA to have a Exer Science degree as a PTA. I'd love to hear someone say why, otherwise. Good Luck!

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Mike in Waterloo, Illinois

29 months ago

Because PTAs suck when it comes to exercise! They don't get anywhere near enough experience using therapeutic exercise in rehabilitatoin. And a lot of orthopedic rehabilitation has to do with exercise.

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PTAstudent in Towson, Maryland

29 months ago

Mike in Waterloo, Illinois said: Because PTAs suck when it comes to exercise! They don't get anywhere near enough experience using therapeutic exercise in rehabilitatoin. And a lot of orthopedic rehabilitation has to do with exercise.

Mike,

I'm not sure how much you know about the field or therapeutic strengthening, but i'm sure you will agree that not all exercises are appropriate. Exercise Science degrees don't teach you how to exercise. We have atleast 5 BS in Exer Science in my class and it did little to know help understanding appropriate strengthening exercises in the program. I'd say if you want more experience while in a PTA program, you will get more as a Rehab tech while in a program. How you would strengthen a TKR or THR, is much different than how you would train someone @ Gold's Gym. Add someone with diabetes, CHF, and a mid-tarsal amputee, and they would be lost. Neuro would be a foreign language. PTAs and PTs looks at patients medically with safety and functional status in mind.

Exer Science is great to learn biomechanics, would be good if you are seaking to be an athletic trainer or sports rehab, but when the orthopedic condition is a secondary condition, the scope changes.

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Mike in Waterloo, Illinois

29 months ago

Once again I must just laugh as you all believe the PTA is some "God-like" program. You all are so set in your mindset that the 2-year associates degree is all that is needed to provide excellent rehabilitation to your patients. Nothing else will help and further education is pointless...

I feel sorry for your patients already...

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chr in Chicago, Illinois

29 months ago

Mike in Waterloo, Illinois said: Once again I must just laugh as you all believe the PTA is some "God-like" program. You all are so set in your mindset that the 2-year associates degree is all that is needed to provide excellent rehabilitation to your patients. Nothing else will help and further education is pointless...

I feel sorry for your patients already...

Not god like. It's a associate of applied science. Not even AA/AS. The curriculum is very specific to physical therapy assisting. There is a reason the state has a licence requirement. It just so happens the program accumulates to a aas degree. Just cause someone would have a four year degree in exercise science does not mean they can apply to take a pta license. Same can be said if I had a BS -ExSci and a MS - Rehab Science, I can't apply to be a PT. The curriculum with exercise science does not cover the specificity of physical therapeutics.
If you want to be in the clinical setting with minor $s for education or don't want to evaluate/discharge pts then PTA is great for you. Any other BS or higher education will separate you from the pack when being hired. Or accepted into a program. Other point I think if is massage. If I was a PTA having classes on massage technique doesn't mean I can apply for a LMT. And those are usually a certificate or diploma programs vs two year for AAS.
will allow/pay for therapy.

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chris in Chicago, Illinois

29 months ago

Mike in Waterloo, Illinois said: Once again I must just laugh as you all believe the PTA is some "God-like" program. You all are so set in your mindset that the 2-year associates degree is all that is needed to provide excellent rehabilitation to your patients. Nothing else will help and further education is pointless...

I feel sorry for your patients already...

Not god like. It's a associate of applied science. Not even AA/AS. The curriculum is very specific to physical therapy assisting. There is a reason the state has a licence requirement and insurance pays when PTA/PTs/ATCs, etc provide treatment. It just so happens the program accumulates to a aas degree. Just cause someone would have a four year degree in exercise science does not mean they can apply to take a pta license. Same can be said if I had a BS -ExSci and a MS - Rehab Science, I can't apply to be a PT. The curriculum with exercise science does not cover the specificity of physical therapeutics.
If you want to be in the clinical setting with minor $s for education or don't want to evaluate/discharge pts then PTA is great for you. Any other BS or higher education will separate you from the pack when being hired. Or accepted into a program. Other point I think if is massage. If I was a PTA having classes on massage technique doesn't mean I can apply for a LMT. And those are usually a certificate or diploma programs vs two year for AAS.

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chris in Chicago, Illinois

29 months ago

Chris in Kokomo, Indiana said: No.

Totally online... no. There are hybrid programs though. Classes are online the usually two weekends a month you visit the school and test.

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Mike in Waterloo, Illinois

29 months ago

Chris, you missed my point. It was previously stated that having a degree in Ex Science would be of no use for a PTA. I never said that a person with an Ex Science degree would (or should) be eligible to sit for a PTA exam. I am saying it would be beneficial for a PTA to have an Ex Science background to enhance their ability to rehab patients.

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PTAstudent in Towson, Maryland

29 months ago

Mike in Waterloo, Illinois said: Once again I must just laugh as you all believe the PTA is some "God-like" program. You all are so set in your mindset that the 2-year associates degree is all that is needed to provide excellent rehabilitation to your patients. Nothing else will help and further education is pointless...

I feel sorry for your patients already...

Mike,

I don't know what you currently do or if you are a current student, but I did not say that having ANY other degree, Exer Science or what have you would not better a person. What I said was that the degree does not give one a better chance of being successful as a clinician. Also, why I said that was that I meant a person does not need to spend 4 years seeking a BS degree and 25k+ in added tuition to go into the PTA field. The fact is personally... I think a BUSINESS degree is more valuable than an Exer Science degree for a PTA. On top of that i'd say that those interested in DPT should seek a science degree for their undergrad or even a pre-med 4 year degree. DPT is now more diagnosis and evaluation oriented. Exercises are such a small part of the field. PTA's and PT's are required to go and continue their education getting CEU's. They seek classes to improve ways to treat all areas for patients, not just the strengthening aspect. I have a bachelor's degree and will be graduated a couple months with this AA degree. I do see the value in education. I have atleast 15 classmates of the 25 that already have bachelors degrees, some even have masters degrees. The fact is many folks are deciding on the quicker way into the field. Of the 15 with BS degrees, 10 have exercise science degrees. All of them said their degree did little for them on preparing them for this new career. And none of them preformed better than the others during the program. What I was saying is that you don't need to spend the money and time, if you don't want too. Any extra education is great, just have to drop

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Future PTA in Seattle, Washington

29 months ago

You were giving the other person personal career advice, but in his head Mike heard an attack on his profession. Mike's just upset because he got the wrong degree. Why else would somebody keep coming back to a forum that is a totally separate field from their chosen profession?

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Dad of 3 in Brunswick, Georgia

29 months ago

chris in Chicago, Illinois said: Totally online... no. There are hybrid programs though. Classes are online the usually two weekends a month you visit the school and test.

My career in real estate shattered after 8 years due to the ecominic crisis. Unfortunately I'm having ot start over with 3 little mouths to feed. I started taking courses online at Everest in Criminal Justice. I'm halfway through with the first semester and want to change to PT, I feel more suited to help people. PTA salary would be simply OK for a while, but I really want to go all the way. Naturally I would prefer to do this online. I appreciate the link that was posted for the accredited schools. I've looked through some of them and one of the closest ones are South college in Sav, GA for PTA and Armstrong in Sav, GA for PT.

Here's my delema. OK I have a few obviously, I have just found out that my unemployment was approved and want to make the best out of it. I've never had the chance to go to college and not have to work, so this is a blessing straight from God. I feel I can take this on. I just don't want to have to travel much due to gas prices. My family had to make a lot of sacrifices and I never want to go through that again. So I have 89 weeks left to work with. After that I need to have employment to survive. Any suggestions? Can someone help me figure this out? I don't want to waste another semester.

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MR in Alabaster, Alabama

28 months ago

Medicare is insolvent. The medical field, including PT will change drastically. If you can't survive, with a family, on PTA current salary you need to pursue the degree. You are looking at three years for a PTA degree, starting from scratch and 7 plus for DPT degree. A PTA may bring home as much as 60K begining. The degree is very cheap compared to DPT and investment is great, right now. That is quickly changing, probably by the end of this year. Salaries will drop. Find something you love and do it. If you are focused on the money only, you are in trouble.

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shahdeep in Toronto, Ontario

28 months ago

Hi, I am just wondering. If you have a 4 year degree, then why would you be interested in becoming a PTA? I am from Ontario, Canada and I am currently in a 2 year PTA/OTA diploma program. I will be finishing in April 2013. And I want to get into Kinesiology once I graduate. But for someone who already has a 4 yr degree, why would you be looking into becoming a PTA? I am sure there is a genuine reason behind you choosing this but I was just wondering if you could suggest me anything that might be helpful to me. By the way, I am planning to move to USA, don't know which state but I heard that there is a good opportunity for PTAs but we need to obtain a license there. SO if you could help me out, I will really appreciate it. Thanks.

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Chris in Chicago, Illinois

28 months ago

Maybe they got the four year first before deciding. Maybe the wanted to finish it before getting into practice as a PTA. Maybe they want an edge on the competition. Maybe they have a business or accounting degree and want to manage.

What state... everywhere. But I see Arizona.California as good options.

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Alicia in Springfield, Missouri

27 months ago

Is it likely to get into a PTA program without a bachelor's? I am about to finish up my first year at a 4-year college. I decided I don't want to go for a Doctorate in Physical Therapy. Only my math and English classes will transfer for the pre-reqs. I took a biomedical science class instead of Biology and it doesn't transfer.
What is the average wait list time?
Is there a similar Bachelor's program to PTA?

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Alicia in Springfield, Missouri

27 months ago

Is it likely to get into a PTA program without a bachelor's? I am about to finish up my first year at a 4-year college. I decided I don't want to go for a Doctorate in Physical Therapy. Only my math and English classes will transfer for the pre-reqs. I took a biomedical science class instead of Biology and it doesn't transfer.
What is the average wait list time?
Is there a similar Bachelor's program to PTA?

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besam94 in Clearwater, Florida

27 months ago

Alicia in Springfield, Missouri said: Is it likely to get into a PTA program without a bachelor's? I am about to finish up my first year at a 4-year college. I decided I don't want to go for a Doctorate in Physical Therapy. Only my math and English classes will transfer for the pre-reqs. I took a biomedical science class instead of Biology and it doesn't transfer.
What is the average wait list time?
Is there a similar Bachelor's program to PTA?

You do not need a Bachelors degree to get into a PTA program...only thing you'll need to have accomplished are the required pre-reqs for the program. This usually means A&P I and II, algebra or higher math, english I and II, public speaking, some sort of psychology, some sort of philosophy or ethics, and possibly a chemistry course. the specifics will vary from school to school but for the most part thats wjat you'll need.

Wait list time varies from school to school as well. It may be a longer wait time for a public school. I applied to my program in 2010 and was wait listed 2 years...I'm finally starting this August.

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Colette in Springfield, Missouri

27 months ago

What have you done the past 2 year while on the wait list?

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manbesam martinez in Tampa, Florida

27 months ago

Colette in Springfield, Missouri said: What have you done the past 2 year while on the wait list?

Worked. Also, since applying way back when the school has changed some of the admissions criteria and added som pre-reqs that I didnt have. So although I was admitted i still needed to accomplish some additional coursework. Three classes I needed were ethics, pharmacology, and medical terminology. I've completed all but medical terminology which I will get done over the summer, before starting the program August.

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manbesam martinez in Tampa, Florida

27 months ago

worked.

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Jennnifer in Boynton Beach, Florida

24 months ago

PTA in Enola, Pennsylvania said: Going into PTA school with an exercise science degree would put you way ahead of the class, but there is still a tremendous amount of therapy to learn. Food for thought... do you know the which muscles control the descent of the lower extremity in end swing phase? Or how the golgi tendon organ affects the muscle spindle during quick stretch? How to test for joint stability? It is not an A.A.S to be taken lightly. Anyone who has earned their license, has EARNED it.

Actually I learned that and more earning my degree in Exercise science. So yes, having that degree would put you ahead of your classmates.

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caj17 in Durham, North Carolina

23 months ago

All of the comments are excellent!! But I have a question about my current situation. Although I know it seems odd, I would love some great advice and recommendations as to how to get into a PTA program, or should I aim for DPT. Also do you think some of the classes will transfer. I am one class away from a MS in Exercise and Wellness, with two years active experience working with sedentary adults/active adults, athletes, and children. Would that be enough to get me into a program, and would credit begin given to courses? Along with a CSCS?

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PTA in Towson, Maryland

22 months ago

CAJ17,

I don't know if you completed your pre-req's for a DPT program or PTA yet, but I'd lean towards DPT. If you go for a PTA license you will not get any more money with your degrees, you will get what they would pay an entry level grad. As far as getting into the program, your grade point avg in the pre-req's is a main qualifier in the competition to get accepted. They also look at observation time and clinical experience. You have good experience as trainer so that may help. Make sure your grades are on par.

Margem63,

Many DPT's elect to do exercise science for their BS. If she sees herself going into Outpatient care that may be an option. The only problem is that jobs and pay aren't the best with that degree. I would personally do a biology degree and that may open up better job opportunities in research if desired. If she is a gym rat than exer science may be better. Getting a bio degree also would set her up for many pre-req's to other medical post grad degrees. If she is young it is a no brainer to go for her DPT. She will need to maintain good grades and I recommend her working as a rehab tech to get experience.

If she went for a PTA degree, yes, she would have to start from scratch. She would have to first get a bachelors degree and then a DPT. Also, if she did the PTA first, it is pretty rare one will go back to get their DPT. Almost all DPT programs are full time during the day. It sounds like she is young. I'd say let her enjoy college, no need to rush college with a 2 year AA degree. Let her enjoy the experience.

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margem63 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

22 months ago

PTA, Towson Marlyand -
Thank you. That was very helpful. She is just a juinor in HIgh School but we are beginning to plan out our next steps. She is currently in a technical High School studying Health Care Rehab. She is pretty sure she wants to follow this course, but last year she wanted to in radio, so go figure. I was just afraid that after 4 years and a bachelor degree, what if she didn't want to carry on with DPT. She says she would also like to be a PE teacher e if she leans so maybe if she leans toward exercise science tnhat would be more be a better backup

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Joseph in Houston, Texas

19 months ago

I'd appreciate help on this ossue. I earned a BA in Pol Sci last year, got accepted to grad school for Spring 13. My fiancee and I are at the most critical time of our blessed lives and we agreed that one of us has to venture into Physical Therapy to secure our future financially and for our business plans in Out-patient rehabilitation...etc.

We've worked as a PT Aides for a while so we understand the field. From my observation, PTA's are always occupied with work, and that's good for its equals more money IMO.

Here's my dilenma; My fiancee just got a breakthrough in Oil & Gas, and she's also starting grad skl by January so I decided to be the one to pursue PT which I love and she decided to sponsor my tuition too. If you're in my shoes, would you

1. Go for the PTA program with a bachelors degree? This is faster and would cost less money then transition to DPT later because i already have a BA?
2. Go for a DPT? More expensive and time consuming, but more reputable?

Thanks in advance.

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Jacob in Gulf Breeze, Florida

19 months ago

If you actually look at the curriculum for almost all DPT programs they are only one semester longer than a PTA program. The only reason it is longer in the beginning is because you have to have a Bachelor's Degree to be able to get into a DPT program. Since you already have your Bachelors Degree it would be pretty much idiotic not to apply for a Physical Therapy program. The program might be more expensive but as a Physical Therapist you make a lot more more than the PTA. If you prefer to be the PTA than go for it, but they get stuck with all the hard work and less pay.

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SPTA Randy J in Hoffman Estates, Illinois

18 months ago

DPT program is "only" 3 yrs long, but it is a total of 150 semester credit hrs. PTA program is 2yrs long, but it is only 40 semester credit hrs plus about 25 hrs of prereqs. DPT students learn a lot about eval and manipulation, but the curiculum about therapeutic exercises and activities are the same.

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Kfizzle88 in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

17 months ago

u in Lakeland, Florida said: A bachelors degree in exercise science is definately superior and requires more work and intelligence than an AA degree for PTA. I have a bacehlors degree in biology and finishing in a PTA program. Its not that the AA is superior. Its just a required program to prepare the student to work as a PTA.

It definately or definitely requires more intelligence? Just wondering...It is or isn't more superior? That's definately why you had to go back to school to get a job.

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bluelineman in McKinney, Texas

17 months ago

To be a PTA you have to have an associates in PTA. Most employers dont care about any other degrees. Its the state license that means more than anything else. You cant do any harm getting an advanced degree, but its not necessary.

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