PT or PTA school

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Joshua Conrad in Carey, Ohio

74 months ago

I'm having a very difficult time deciding whether to go on to PT school or PTA school. I'm 34 with a bachelors degree and licensure as a massage therapist. PT school would require that I go back for a full year to do the science prerequisites (3 biology classes/3 physics classes/ and 3 chemistry classes) then take the GRE, go through the application process, and then the 3 years for PT school. If I went the PTA route I could be done in little over a year.
Any advise, ancedotes, or experience is greatyl appreciated

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FitCTmom in Farmington, Connecticut

72 months ago

Hi! I have to disagree with adventurer2. I think you should go for the PTA. Here's the reason. You are 34 years old. Most PTs age out around 60 TOPS. (most PTs I know start transitioning to teaching or another career in their 50's b/c patients are getting bigger, etc. Also, by the year 2020 APTA and most companies are starting to expect PTs to have their PhD. Do you have any idea what that will cost? if you are done by the time you are 40 and you work 20 years how long will it take for you to pay yourself back? Also, can you afford to stop working and go to school Full-time for about 4 - 6 years? You can make about 60K a year in a SNF or home health. The cost of a PTA degree is so cheap (especially when you already have a bachelor's) that the bang for your buck trade off is obvious. I am 39 and just got accepted to the PTA program in my state. I thought about going the PT route, but...financially education is always an investment and I just can't justify that investment without a decent return. Also, there are so many opportunities to use your PTA in creative ways. I teach fitness and am a personal trainer. Trainers make 60.00 an hour (when they work for themselves) I charge even more as a PTA working with post rehab clients....

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adventurer in Far Rockaway, New York

72 months ago

The answer is fitctmom just got accepted into the program her head is still in the clouds and has fairydust sprinkle into what she thinks will be a lovely career in reality it is a great career and I do enjoy what I do. It is very sad though that joshua I am thinking you are or may want to be the primary provider in your household. that requires earning money as a LPTA it is tough when employers no matter how good you are just can't pay you what you deserve because their budget will not allow it or because it does not make sense to pay a good assistant as much as a PT because we are not allowed to perform ann initial evaluation. If soccer mom thinks she can earn more than 60. an hour working with post rehab patients thats a nice dream but who are this patients that are going to pay out of pocket for this? How many people do you know come to a physical therapy clinic and pay out of pocket. She is also older than you by six years it may have been a good choice for her I can tell you PT is the way to go you may hate the time but you are still young enough to do it and have a good career at 40 or you can go the PTA way and be in practice by age 36 and not make as much as a new grad when you hit 40. Just bite the bullet do your classes and become a PT or don't and become a PTA the work will be there both just as hard but guess who has more authority by law. Than take a guess who brings home the bigger paycheck. I am not putting PTA's down I am just saying alot of them will tell you that we dont get the recognition or monetary benefit we deserve you since you asked I'm just honestly telling you the truth. It will also help to do some research on salary on the net.

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FitCTmom in Farmington, Connecticut

72 months ago

Joshua, I hope you do a lot of research before making your decision. Clearly, if you make the wrong one you will end up bitter and full of regrets. I, for one, made the choice that was right for me and offer my thoughts to those who are genuinely looking for advice from a mature and educated person changing careers. I don't insult, put down or otherwise mock others choices. Life is much, much too short to be bitter and angry with the world. I wish you well on your career...whatever road it takes you on.

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smokey34 in Elkhart, Indiana

72 months ago

i am 25yrs old and i am currently in a pta program in my state. I am thinking of finishing the PTA program, work for a couple of years and then regroup to go back and get my PT. Would this be an ok move to make? what are some of your recommendations people!!! Please advice is you see fit.

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FitCTmom in Farmington, Connecticut

72 months ago

You are so young! Absolutely go back and become a PT!!!

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Jackie in Jordan, Montana

72 months ago

Joshua Conrad in Carey, Ohio said: I'm having a very difficult time deciding whether to go on to PT school or PTA school. I'm 34 with a bachelors degree and licensure as a massage therapist. PT school would require that I go back for a full year to do the science prerequisites (3 biology classes/3 physics classes/ and 3 chemistry classes) then take the GRE, go through the application process, and then the 3 years for PT school. If I went the PTA route I could be done in little over a year.
Any advise, ancedotes, or experience is greatyl appreciated

If you want to go to school with more mature people choose PT. If you want to quickly get through school in one year choose PTA. PTs typically evaluate patients the first day and PTAs treat patients. If you like to get to know patients, PTA have a great job.

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FitCTmom in Farmington, Connecticut

72 months ago

i don't know anyone who gets through PTA school in one year. Here in CT it's a two year (5 semester) program and the pre-reqs add on another year (at least to it). PT will need to be PhDs soon and that's a minimum of 6 years going full time (but, more likely at least 8 years). I wish I was done in a year!

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smclean83 in Columbus, Ohio

72 months ago

Some PTA programs are 1+1 so you can transfer a lot of prereqs in to the program. I transferred classes from my bachelor degree and did 10 weeks last summer, one full fall semester, now I have 15 weeks of clinicals and I'm done.
The APTA vision 2020 is not requiring PhDs in physical therapy its the DPT, which takes 3 years to complete. Another option is the University of St. Augustine, they have a flex program which allows you to work full-time and complete school work online and show up for labs I believe one full week-end a month... the flex program does take 4 years to complete though for the DPT(Doctorate of Physical Therapy)

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FitCTmom in Farmington, Connecticut

72 months ago

wish we had that in CT. As it stands right now, only one program in the entire state....

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ksoto in Passaic, New Jersey

72 months ago

Hello. I am in the same situation. I am currently a medical assistant, and while most of my colleagues chose to pursue nursing as their next step, i decided that it was not for me. I explored different career paths online, and came up with physical therapy as one of the most rewarding...i also found out about pta's. I even began volunteering at a local rehab center to see first-hand what the pts and ptas do. I think it is a great career. However, i have the same dilemma, whether to go to PT or PTA program. I actually have never been to college until this past fall, and i am just taking my basic pre-req courses. I work full time during the day, and have no idea how i am going to do either program. The only pta program near me is full time during the day, and would require me to quit my secure job, and find something in the evenings. In order to enter a DPT program, i would have to get my associates at community college, transfer to a 4 year institution for my bachelors in health science, clock in several hundred hours of volunteer work at a pt office, apply for the program, and hopefully get accepted, and that will take around 3 1/2 years to complete. It is very expensive and long. The pta program by me does offer an easier transition to a DPT program in NYC, but when i called that school just to make sure, they told me i would still have to probably spend an additional year getting my general education credits before being accepted. So even though that is an option, it is still going to take time and money. I am thinking that the PTA program will be the better choice at the moment, and if i enjoy it enough, i can always attempt to finish the requirements for getting into the DPT program. I am 26 years old. people are telling me i am young and have time...and i tell them, yeah but i don't have the money lol. The fact is, i am quite scared of quitting my day job to go to school for 2 years, and only relying on a night job to pay my bills......

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FitCTmom in Farmington, Connecticut

72 months ago

If you don't have your Bachelor's yet, it would be wise to get the PTA under your belt first. Just as a warning, the PTA program I am enrolled in has about a 50% attrition rate, b/c pp try to work at the same time. They just can't handle all of it. You should try to save some cash then, switch to part time work so you will be able to graduate with great grades!

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FitCTmom in Farmington, Connecticut

72 months ago

I don't want to discourage you, however you do need to understand reality. If you need to take all of the required Associates Degree class (ie: public speaking, English Comp etc...) in addition to taking all of the PTA courses there won't be much of a chance for you to work full-time only very, very limited p/t work. My suggestion to you (and one they give to the students at school) is to take ALL of the classes required for the degree (that aren't PT related) BEFORE you begin the program. You can do that partially online, at night etc... Then, when you start the program you will probably only have PTA classes 2 days a week (which is how my program runs - the other days are for non-major courses). The other days of the week you could feasibly work as long as you were committed to doing A LOT of studying at night. Keep in mind however, you will have to do full-time clinicals at the end of your program. Our final semester (of 5 semesters total) is essentially 14 weeks of 40 hour work weeks in various clinical settings, plus a seminar. I haven't done that yet, but I can't imagine anyone holding any other type of job while doing that. I think it is doable for you if you approach in the way I outlined. If you save a lot of cash before you start it will be easier when you have to stop working altogether. I am lucky that I don't have to worry about that aspect of going back to school. I do, however, have to find time to study with three small children and have a lot of babysitters (and back up sitters) in place before I start. Good Luck

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Joshua Conrad in Columbus, Ohio

71 months ago

Thanks for ALL of the thoughtful insights---I didn't clarify that I already have a bachelors degree and many of the prerequisites for PTA/ That being said I have decided to go back and get the prereqs. that I don't have for the DPT entrance and then apply to a DPT program. A good part of this decision was based on all the great considerations submitted here- Cheers!

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jennifer in Brooklyn, New York

71 months ago

this helped me alot because i want to be a massage therapist to amd dont know what to do can u give me some suggestions.

thank you

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bc38

70 months ago

Can anyone help me out here with information on PTA night school? I have a friend who is looking to do this and has to keep her daytime job. Any help would be appreciated!!!

Thx Bob

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FitCTmom in Salem, New Hampshire

70 months ago

I have never heard of a school that offers a PTA program at night. Most pp in my class have either given up their jobs or will be soon....

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Kim L in El Dorado Hills, California

70 months ago

Sacramento City College has ALL evening classes, most from 5 or 6 to 9 or 10. All so that people can work during the day except for when clinicals are happening. Not sure where you live, but all programs are set up differently.

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rick d in Branford, Connecticut

70 months ago

jennifer in Brooklyn, New York said: this helped me alot because i want to be a massage therapist to amd dont know what to do can u give me some suggestions.

thank you

remember jennifer. new york has a different set of rules for becoming a massage therapist. you need double the time for new york than any other state. I believe there is a ccmt campus just into connecticut. this is an excellent school an its reputaion is respected nation wide. rick d. branford c.t. ccmt student newington

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Steve in Deerfield Beach, Florida

70 months ago

Joshua Conrad in Carey, Ohio said: I'm having a very difficult time deciding whether to go on to PT school or PTA school. I'm 34 with a bachelors degree and licensure as a massage therapist. PT school would require that I go back for a full year to do the science prerequisites (3 biology classes/3 physics classes/ and 3 chemistry classes) then take the GRE, go through the application process, and then the 3 years for PT school. If I went the PTA route I could be done in little over a year.
Any advise, ancedotes, or experience is greatyl appreciated

I am 38 now and been a PTA for 3 years. I started the PTA program at 32. I would go for the PTA program at your stage of the game. If you like doing more paper work and doing evaluations than a PT would be the better route for you, but you need to think about the cost of schooling and time. A PTA program will cost you less in money and time. The PT route will cost a lot more in time and money. I also work with PT's and they are always complaining about the paper work, they have a lot more paper work than myself because of the evals. Although they get paid a lot more than I do, they have a lot more responsibility. I think the APTA should have a bride program that PTA's can become PT's if they choose. Instead they are now making the PT programs doctorate degree's, while the PTA require only an associates degree. I do not understand the rationale in it, except to hold PTA's back and put more pressure on the new PT's for more schooling and money. I also had the same dilema whether to go the PT route or PTA route, and I think I made the right decision of being a PTA. You can still earn a fairly decent living as a PTA and have less loans to pay back and more time to get started in your career. It would be nice to have a bridge program where you can decide later if you want to be a PT and have more of a choice. Anyway, whatever your choice is, good luck.

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FitCTmom in Connecticut

70 months ago

There are bridge programs out there. Not a lot of them, but they do exist. I am 39 and doing the PTA for the same reason. I look at education as an investment, and dollar for dollar, I'll make more money as a PTA when you back out how much I'll spend on a DPT in time and money. But, that's b/c of my age. If I were 25 I'd get the DPT....

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Samuel Fills in Herndon, Virginia

70 months ago

FitCTmom in Farmington, Connecticut said: Hi! I have to disagree with adventurer2. I think you should go for the PTA. Here's the reason. You are 34 years old. Most PTs age out around 60 TOPS. (most PTs I know start transitioning to teaching or another career in their 50's b/c patients are getting bigger, etc. Also, by the year 2020 APTA and most companies are starting to expect PTs to have their PhD. Do you have any idea what that will cost? if you are done by the time you are 40 and you work 20 years how long will it take for you to pay yourself back? Also, can you afford to stop working and go to school Full-time for about 4 - 6 years? You can make about 60K a year in a SNF or home health. The cost of a PTA degree is so cheap (especially when you already have a bachelor's) that the bang for your buck trade off is obvious. I am 39 and just got accepted to the PTA program in my state. I thought about going the PT route, but...financially education is always an investment and I just can't justify that investment without a decent return. Also, there are so many opportunities to use your PTA in creative ways. I teach fitness and am a personal trainer. Trainers make 60.00 an hour (when they work for themselves) I charge even more as a PTA working with post rehab clients....

I am considering PTA and fitness also (do you have your own business)?

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FitCTmom in Connecticut

70 months ago

Hi, PTA and fitness together is a great idea. I have spoken to my professors about whether or not I am chasing something that is not feasible. They reassured me saying that part of the APTA 2020 vision is to have PTs be the go to pp for health, fitness and wellness. Many clinics have "gyms" where they can go after they have been discharged from treatment but still need guidance. I'd like to be involved with that in a clinic setting as well as work privately. I do work as a Personal Trainer (on a very limited basis now that I'm in school) privately in clients homes. I charge 60.00 an hour. However, I know from speaking to others that as a licensed PTA I can charge more. So, I will probably continue to do that on the side as well as work in an out-pt clinic part time when I graduate. As it is with anything in life you make your own success and your own happiness, so if fitness and PTA is your passion, you should definatey go for it!

Good Luck

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lovemybulldog in Issaquah, Washington

70 months ago

Wow, this was very very helpful for me. I am a 36 year old mom to a 2 year old, and currently working fulltime in the IT field. I was very involved in Sports Medicine as a teenager and aspired to become a PT or Sports Med Doctor, but life took hold and I never went to college. I am now entertaining the idea of either quitting my job or going part time to go back to school. Because I would have a lot to juggle, I am trying to decide between PTA and PT...and OTA and OT. There are several AA Degree positions for both assistant roles in my area, all are all-day 2 year programs. To go the PT or OT route, I would really have to ask my family to forget about me for many years... and the more I read, the more I think I would enjoy the Assistant role responsibilities anyway, and would have more flexibility if down the road I want do do it part time or home care.

I can do most of my prerequisites online or at night and save to go part time or quit my job... All this if I can get my husband to agree!

All this research makes me realize that I should have never taken that "year off" between high school and college. My biggest piece of advice to anyone young is to get at least their Bachelor's in place as early as possible so they have options later... and to find your passion before you have kids! I love my son and hubby to the ends of the earth and back, but heck...if only I had gotten this out of the way 10 or 15 years ago. Hindsight's 20/20, right?

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FitCTmom in Connecticut

70 months ago

Good for you for going back to school. I am in my first year of PTA school right now, and I have to admit...I am not loving it like I thought I would. I am really now trying to decide (after 18 months of pre-reqs even with a Bachelors) if I am going to stick it out. I am fortunate enough to not have to work right now and my income will always be the supplementary one. So, I am trying to reconcile a very busy schedule at school with what I am giving up. Three kids in the middle of their childhood and I'll never get the time back I spend studying, practicing etc. After all the work to just get into school, I am going to wait out the semester and see if the feeling passes. My only recommendation would be to go to the school, shadow the students and talk to them about how they like school and how much time they put in.

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Tracy in West Bloomfield, Michigan

70 months ago

Hi. I am looking at changing careers and I'm 38. I'm looking into being physical therapy assistant. It's a bit over-whelming, since I'm a graphic designer and changing at my age but I want to do something that actually helps people. Is there anyone that went for their associate degree in PTA, a little later in life while working and maintaining a young family? I know this will be very challenging. Can anyone give me some advice or insight?

Also, I'm not the best in math. Is this something that would hinder me from working in this field?

FitCTmom: I have a question for you. Why are you not loving it like you thought you would? Your comments scare me a little since I have a 7 & 4 year old and work 4 days a week. We are not in a position for me to quit and go to school. Is it too much? Do you think that it's too difficult with work, family and school?

Thanks in advance for any advice or knowledge!!

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FitCTmom in Connecticut

69 months ago

I am currently a PTA student with three kids age 2, 7 and 10. I had to take pre-reqs (a&p, bio etc. that took 18 months to complete - they have to be taken in a certain order at my school) an now I am finally in my first semester of PTA school. On paper it doesn't seem like much...just 7 credits, two classes. No biggie, right? What they didn't tell me was that we also have to plan time to come in to "practice" with other students, do group projects, etc... All in addition to the 11 or so hours a week I am in school. I am a good student and a relatively quick study, so I'm not pulling my hair out yet, but I know then next two years will be challenging. I am 39 years old and will be 41 when I graduate. I am excited about the new career, but I am not sure that if I actually worked outside the home I'd be able to do this. The faculty actually warns against it and the attrition rate is very high at my school (around 50%) the only pp left in the second year (as far as I can tell) are the young students with no other commitments and some older students (with or without kids)that don't work. There are clinical rotations that have to be done while in school as well, so it's like having an unpaid p/t job in addition to school. So, it's a lot to think about. It's definately do-able, just know you will be very, very busy for 2 years. Oh, and if you don't have a supportive family and spouse - forget it. If your spouse isn't willing to help out, you will have an enormous challenge on your hands. Hope that helps, Good Luck!

(p.s. - even knowing all this, I am still confident I made the right decision!)

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Tracy in West Bloomfield, Michigan

69 months ago

FitCTmom, Thanks for responding. This is all very helpful and very depressing. I'm in a situation that I cannot quit my job. I work for GM so there's a good possibility that I won't have a job in 6 months anyway but that will put us in a very bad situation if that happens. I want to make a career change because I'm really struggling with my industry and haven't been happy for 6 years. I really want to do something that will help people. My husband isn't totally behind me since we already find it difficult to balance work/family life. Looks pretty bleak. BUT, change is always difficult and when thinking about the rest of my working career, 2-3 years isn't that long.

I guess the next steps I'm going to take are to shadow someone in a few different environments and start taking my pre-req classes on-line. That alone is going to take me a while to complete, as you stated. I know I can't go into this with any doubts. That's clear from what you wrote. I'll be researching and thinking a lot over the next couple weeks.

Thanks so much for your honesty. I appreciate it.

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FitCTmom in Connecticut

69 months ago

Good Luck to you. Just, fyi, there are loans, financial aids and all kinds of other programs out there. It is smart for you to be pro-active, shadowing someone is the best start! Post again when you can!

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Debbie in Brunswick, Ohio

69 months ago

I want to thank everyone for posting and participating in these online blogs -- they are very informative for so many people. I too, am in my early 40's and want to change careers. I'm looking at massage therapy and/or PTA and then perhaps get certified as a personal trainer as well. I know there are certain older adults that would like a personal trainer that isn't in their 20's to help them. My mom is 74 and she joined the Silver Sneaker program and is getting help with a personal trainer; I think that is wonderful. I work nights now and can do the pre reqs online for the PTA as well, so I was just doing some research when I found this blog. I am single and have no one to fall back on so I can't quit my job to go to school full time. So, I thought I might get licensed as a LMT first so I can have a more flexibile schedule and then go for the PTA. I ultimately am looking for a career with flexibility; any thoughts?

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FitCTmom in Connecticut

69 months ago

There are several LMTs in our program and they do work a limited number of hours so that is probably a good plan. One thing to mention that I keep reading about in these posts. A lot of pp plan on taking all of their pre-reqs online. Of the 7 classes I had to take (Elem. Algebra, Int. Algebra, General Psych, Bio, Chemistry, A&PI and A&P II) only one was available to take online (the psych class). The sciences are lab classes and I don't know of any program that allows you to take those types of classes exclusively online. In our CT state schools, to get into the PTA program, they have to be 4 credit lect/lab classes taken within 5 years of application to the program. They also have to be taken in a specific order. (ie: can't take anatomy until you've had bio and chem - can't take chem until you've had int. algebra...). I don't know what it's like in other states, but the rules are pretty strict here. Just something to think about.

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Tracy in West Bloomfield, Michigan

69 months ago

That's really good to know. This site has been the most helpful out of anything I've found. Thanks for the advice! Lovemybulldog or Stephanie posted her email address on another topic for you, FitCTmom, if you'd like to stay in touch. Just an FYI.

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power for a purpose in Franklin, Tennessee

69 months ago

Tracy in West Bloomfield, Michigan said: That's really good to know. This site has been the most helpful out of anything I've found. Thanks for the advice! Lovemybulldog or Stephanie posted her email address on another topic for you, FitCTmom, if you'd like to stay in touch. Just an FYI.

Hi Gals. Love the conversation. You all seem like wise girls. For what it is worth...I went back to school at Oakland University in prep for PT school while I was raising a young family. I think it was very difficult and took a lot of time away from my kids. I am a huge advocate of a higher education but be careful the cost to your family. In these hard economic times it is really hard to not have a 2 income family. I do have a job position with a dermatological company that is looking to expand nationwide if any of you are interested. The pay is very lucrative and can be worked around whatever you are already doing. My heart goes out to all of us who are trying to wear so many hats and be successful. I love helping other people and that is why I do what I do. If I can help you please contact me. I hope this helps.

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Tracy in West Bloomfield, Michigan

69 months ago

Hi power for a purpose!

It's a huge decision that is not fully accepted by my husband. I have to do more research and a lot of classes that have to be completed even before entering the program. It's a little over-whelming. I don't want to make a mistake but don't want to lose an opportunity that might be a better option for the whole families future. You're absolutely right about hard economic times. If I lose my job at GM, I won't find another job in my field. I have friends that lost their jobs 8 months ago and have not found anything.

Did you complete your PT program? Do you mind me asking why you're not in the field any longer? What kind of company do you work for? If it's like Arbonne or something, that's not for me. Who wouldn't want to earn a little extra money on the side though and maybe save for my future PTA course!

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Stephani Mrzena in Snoqualmie, Washington

69 months ago

Hi FitCTMom! Tracy and I have been chatting offline and it is a big help to have others in the same situation to discuss this process with. We would love to stay in touch with you as you progress through your PTA program. As moms with similar goals, I would love to stay in touch. I can be reached at ssmrzena@comcast.net.

Big Big thank you for all your info... That goes for everyone on this forum.

"Power for a Purpose", did you go thru PT or PTA? I'm also curious about what took you away from that field and your impression of whether or not it was a good decision to go back to school mid-life.

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arnr in Dayton, Ohio

69 months ago

Is it common to have pta classes only in the m-f daytime?

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FitCTmom in Connecticut

69 months ago

I have heard on these posts that a couple of schools offer evening classes, but I have never seen them and they're not offered in CT. I can't imagine doing these classes at night. I had school all day today from 8:30 - 2pm and then practiced for 2 hours after that. I didn't get home until after 4:30. Now, after feeding kids, and putting them to bed I'll be studying until 11pm.

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Stephani Mrzena in Snoqualmie, Washington

69 months ago

There are three programs within sane driving distance of my house and all 3 are M-F all day (one is half day on Friday). Some are half days once it gets into the clinical part of year 2, but then require off site clinic work. I live outside Seattle and while there are several programs in Washington as a whole, I think only one has an evening or flex schedule and it's not accredited to my knowledge. It is on the other side of the state and about 5 hours for most people.

Each school I am researching in my area has different prereq requirement. Some require a sequence, some do not. The better of the schools I am considering does not require a sequence except for the A&P 1,2... and the English & Speech classes. The math and psychology class can be taken in any order. All but the A&P and speech classes are available online and the others are available at night. I know each school is widely different, so ARNR, you may just want to start visiting your area schools' websites or call for a schedule. Ask them to send you as much info as they can about the program and then walk on campus and as students.

You might also get some school feedback on something like Facebook if you do a search for the school name + Physical Therapy or Physical Therapist. I've sent a few folks with that matching criteria questions and got great responses.

Good luck!... Oh, and FitCTmom, I got your email! I'll reply as soon as I can. Thanks for keeping in touch.

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mechanical man in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

69 months ago

smokey34 in Elkhart, Indiana said: i am 25yrs old and i am currently in a pta program in my state. I am thinking of finishing the PTA program, work for a couple of years and then regroup to go back and get my PT. Would this be an ok move to make? what are some of your recommendations people!!! Please advice is you see fit.

go for it, you are still very young and a few students that I went to school with decided to do the same. If you are able to handle the academics and cash.

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FitCTmom in Connecticut

69 months ago

Of Course you should do it! You are young! Find one of the few PTA to PT programs and apply to one. Most of them have a minimum number of of years as a practicing PTA so, your plan makes sense.
Good Luck!

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CTmom2 in North Grosvenordale, Connecticut

69 months ago

I really appreciate your infor. I too live in CT. From these blogs, I thought doing clases online was a great idea. Until I came to your blog and it makes alot of sense. I'm 48 and young at heart, and chose to become a PTA and perhaps later PT. I'm interested in becoming self employed by becoming a PT. But, now I thought more to the idea of just PTA.
Thank you for your infor and what school you attend.

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CTmom2 in North Grosvenordale, Connecticut

69 months ago

I actually live in Woodstock

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Priya in Rockfall, Connecticut

69 months ago

I have decided going back to School, but stuck between Ultrasound Tech VS PTA. Can you help me out? I am new to CT area and living in shelton, CT.

thanks.
Priya

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FitCTmom in Connecticut

69 months ago

As of right now, it is my understanding that the only program in CT is the one I am in : Naugatuck Valley Community College. We have people from all over the state in the program. I do believe however, that Norwalk Community College is coming up with a program. I don't know when it starts though. Good luck.

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FitCTmom in Connecticut

69 months ago

What is it you want to know? I don't know anything about the Radiology program. But, I can tell you they are completely different fields. Have you done any research into the type of career you want?

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Priya in Rockfall, Connecticut

69 months ago

FitCTmom in Connecticut said: What is it you want to know? I don't know anything about the Radiology program. But, I can tell you they are completely different fields. Have you done any research into the type of career you want?

I have done research , as far as diagnostic medical sonography( ultrasound ) there are not many schools in CT area. I wanna know job scopes for Physical therapy to ultrasound? number of job oppurtunities in the near future? Is the program at Naugatuck Valley C. C is accredited?

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FitCTmom in Connecticut

69 months ago

yes, the NVCC program is accredited. And like I said, its the only program in the state. I don't know where Rockfall is, but, if you are near the MA border, there is always the CC in Springfield MA. They have a program, too. Additionally, I just want to point out that the reason I said they are very different is because (at least when it comes to being a PTA) it is a very "hands on" career. You are touching, lifting and helping people, some who are very sick. It is also an extremely time-consuming program. It's not brain surgery, however it is difficult and requires a very large time committment. I need those on this blog to understand, it's not just "oh I'll take a couple of online classes and then I'll just go to school for a couple years" No... Learning the different skills takes time and practice. You don't possibly have time enough during the school day to practice, because you are learning new things, taking comps, exams, etc... You have to go in and practice on your free time with other students. The ones who fail out or drop out are almost always the ones who don't study enough, practice enough, or take it seriously enough. It's not a "job" its a career. You have to like people, you have to be comfortable with sick, injured and sometimes dying people. If you are not, don't waste your time and money pursuing it.

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Priya in Rockfall, Connecticut

69 months ago

Thanks a lot for your advice and it really counts. I think we are sailing in the same boat. I am in the mid 30's and trying to do some thing else in health care.I have done my Associates Degree in Hospital Pharmacy from MI and moved out of State due to spouse job change. I will try to contact NVCC counselors. Can you recommend some ?
Thanks,
Priya

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FitCTmom in Connecticut

69 months ago

The director of the program is Cindy LaCouture. Other wise, you can go to the NVCC website and find the counselors and requirements for admission.

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Priya in Rockfall, Connecticut

69 months ago

If you don't mind can you tell me the approximate cost just tution alone for 2 years?

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