Questions for Physical Therapist Assistants, please help me decide if this career is right for me.

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roseannadanna in Fayetteville, North Carolina

38 months ago

Ben and all others, I am 48 and have been offered a seat in a PTA program at a local college. What concerns me comes 2 fold. First my age, I will be finished when I am 50 and I want to have career longevity; working till I'm 65. My thoughts is that this profession is too physically demanding to work until 60 let alone 65. Gosh that sounds old.

Secondly, I have some slight sciatic issues, but it is new and something which causes concern in mobility change as I get older. Health wise I would rate my overall health as a 8/10.

I've been thinking of going the Radiation therapist route, but they are Oversat'd to heed it. Also considered going to school; 4-5 years more and get my masters in speech pathology. Less physical stress. Your input would be appreciated

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PTAstudent in Baltimore, Maryland

38 months ago

roseannadanna in Fayetteville, North Carolina said: Ben and all others, I am 48 and have been offered a seat in a PTA program at a local college. What concerns me comes 2 fold. First my age, I will be finished when I am 50 and I want to have career longevity; working till I'm 65. My thoughts is that this profession is too physically demanding to work until 60 let alone 65. Gosh that sounds old.

Secondly, I have some slight sciatic issues, but it is new and something which causes concern in mobility change as I get older. Health wise I would rate my overall health as a 8/10.

I've been thinking of going the Radiation therapist route, but they are Oversat'd to heed it. Also considered going to school; 4-5 years more and get my masters in speech pathology. Less physical stress. Your input would be appreciated

I'd go the route of RT or ST. Working in PT past 60 as a clinician is rare. You could obviously get an admin job or mgmt position, but the PTA degree limits you. RT and ST are much less demanding. ST offers higher income of the three, but requires more education. Also, there is a lot of uncertainty to the PTA field. There have been bills past that may change the scope, pay, etc. Two years from now RT may be back in demand, all healthcare goes through that, PTAs will as well.

Have you thought of getting an MBA with healthcare concentraction? Healthcare is a scary place now, with how insurance reimbursement and medicare changes are going

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PTAstudent in Baltimore, Maryland

38 months ago

Bridge It in Denver, Colorado said: Hi, I have a bachelor's degree in international business, have gotten a personal training license, am now working as a personal trainer consultant, and am also taking classes again for prereq's into physical therapy school. I have an international business degree (which I already told you in the first sentence) so I need to take 100 percent of the science classes needed to get into physical therapy school. I am moderately excited about this career path and realize it is going to be a longer term (4.75 years) goal, but am starting to question whether to become a PTA instead. I was hoping someone who maybe was in the same position or anyone one who would have insight could help me out. I wish only to get happy, smiley feedback on this either way, no Negative Nancy or Debbie Downer comments please. Thanks!

If you are still relatively young. Under 35. I'd definitely go the DPT route. More jobs, autonomy, money, less uncertainty, more areas to go into. Actually, after spring 2012 as a ATC you may be able to practice in OP settings, the APTA is trying to either add or change PTA scope. Won't get paid as much as a PT or PTA but will be able to practice.

Not sure you looked into OT, but that's a masters, you could graduate I think in 2-3 years. They work on UE and ADL's and work hand in hand with PT. They also get paid very well, better than PTAs.

Hope this helped.

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Ben in Sedona, Arizona

38 months ago

Congrats on your change of career. I am 48 and just started working as a PTA in a SNF. I also have sciatic issues, and shoulder issues as a result of 4 surgeries about 7 yrs ago. I still workout with weights and do some cardio. I have no real issues with health now and do not believe there will be any. You can sit on stools quite often and perform therapy with just about any patient. I adjust the patients to suit my body all the time. I do a fair ammount of sit to stand transfers with big patients on my own, but by choice. There is always someone around to help if you need it, so don't let that concern you too much. In a SNF most patients are low level functioning and very easy to work with. A lot of sitting exercises with supervision are commonplace. I thought outpatient was just as easy if not easier, as most of them can walk in and out by themselves. I went with SNF for two reasons. I plan to retire sooner than later, and SNFs pay way better. The older folks are just plain nicer and slower paced, which suits me just fine. Good luck!

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PTAstudent in Baltimore, Maryland

38 months ago

roseannadanna in Fayetteville, North Carolina said: Ben and all others, I am 48 and have been offered a seat in a PTA program at a local college. What concerns me comes 2 fold. First my age, I will be finished when I am 50 and I want to have career longevity; working till I'm 65. My thoughts is that this profession is too physically demanding to work until 60 let alone 65. Gosh that sounds old.

Secondly, I have some slight sciatic issues, but it is new and something which causes concern in mobility change as I get older. Health wise I would rate my overall health as a 8/10.

I've been thinking of going the Radiation therapist route, but they are Oversat'd to heed it. Also considered going to school; 4-5 years more and get my masters in speech pathology. Less physical stress. Your input would be appreciated

One thing to consider also is that you have been accepted a seat in the program. I'm guessing you have all your pre-reqs done, if so, you may want to just go with the PTA program. Most have long waits. I know a lot of ST programs are very competitive to get into as well, not sure about RT or the schools in your area.

If you can start next Fall (guessing that is when new class starts) you can save yourself time. Sounds like that is one factor you are worried about.

There are some settings as the last poster mentioned that requires less lifting, and less hands on treatment. SNF you barely touch the patients. I think this is why many PTs and PTAs find it as less desirable. So in that case you probably could manage it later in age. Make sure you can tolerate hours on your feet.

The reason of my last post is that i'm doing my affils and treating patients now at hospitals. Many are very overweight and the manual therapy and lifting even with proper body mechanics can take a toll. I'm 33 and feel it.

Good luck.

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roseannadanna in Fayetteville, North Carolina

38 months ago

Thanks for the feedback all!
I've decided to forgo the PTA route, despite my acceptance into the program. I spoke to 3 PT in my area (Raleigh NC) and each one warned of the physical stresses and in that none of them have worked with anyone over the age of 55. (Ugh!) The nail that sealed it was that 2 of them said significant changes are in the works for PTAs in the next year. They mentioned that unless the PTA profession moved forward requiring a bachelors that it would probably be outsourced to include massage therapist to do the function of PTA. This I gathered was due to insurance measures not covering the work of PTA at full reimbursement. In fact one of the PT's said that they once had 5 PTA for every PT and they let go of half of the PTA and replaced them with PT because of reimbursement grades. (double ugh!!)

My age, health and profession viability seals the deal. This is not to write that PTA's will fade out, rather I think the profession might be in for a bumpy ride and I'm not sure my butt can take it. No matter I admire all of you that have made it, the prereqs alone were tough.

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Nguyen Duy in San Jose, California

38 months ago

HI anh Minh,
I am in PTA 101 in Ohlone college now. But I did not see you in class. Please reply me if you can.

Thanks.

Nguyen Duy

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josh s in Pontiac, Michigan

37 months ago

Que in Spring, Texas said: Hello,
I am a PTA now for five years. I have worked in skilled nursing, hospital, outpatient , and now home health. I must tell you stress is all Dependant on the relationship you have with your supervising PT. I have worked with PT's that allow me to be a PTA they complete the Plan of care and allow me to treat the patient based of there plan. However I have also worked with some PT's that I have to answer why where how and when about everything I do. While to do fully understand that I have to be supervised by a PT i also enjoy a challenge of problem solving through a situation. As far as the actual practice of a PTA I love it and I think has limited stress, as with any job. But as far as the nursing versus therapy,i would pick therapy you pt area all different and you don't have t worry about as much stress.

Maybe you should have taken some english coarses in school. I can't even understand this nonsense.

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cotatobe in Boston, Massachusetts

37 months ago

josh s in Pontiac, Michigan said: Maybe you should have taken some english coarses in school. I can't even understand this nonsense.

Maybe you should too. You would have learnt the difference between courses and coarses. You know, words that sound alike, but spelt differently.

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jchx19 in Dayton, Ohio

35 months ago

Hey guys, I am thinking of going back to school as a Physical Therapy Assisstant, I am really interested on this course because I want to help people but 1 thing I am concerned about is me being small (4'7 & 93 lbs.). I talked to my friend who is a nurse in a nursing home and she told me that she think it would be hard for me because in that field it has alot of lifting. please guys I need more opinion. thank you.

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Future PTA in Seattle, Washington

35 months ago

Honestly, I think you are going to find it hard but it depends on the area you want to work in. At your size, outpatient would probably be better because you won't be lifting as much. In any case (and this is not a joke) I would begin engagement in a serious training regimen if I were you. At your size, you are going to need to be as strong as possible if you want to make this career a reality. But if you want it bad enough, you can do it.

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PTAstudent in Towson, Maryland

35 months ago

Future PTA in Seattle, Washington said: Honestly, I think you are going to find it hard but it depends on the area you want to work in. At your size, outpatient would probably be better because you won't be lifting as much. In any case (and this is not a joke) I would begin engagement in a serious training regimen if I were you. At your size, you are going to need to be as strong as possible if you want to make this career a reality. But if you want it bad enough, you can do it.

jchx19,

I don't completely agree with statement. You are small, and i've have classemates and worked with PT's that are smaller. I've offered the same advice to others that asked. As mentioned if you work in an OP sports rehab setting you won't need to lift as much. Your friend in the SNF, is in a setting where some lifting is requiring, acute settings are even worse.

I was a Rehab tech at a sports rehab facility and the PT there was very small and thin. But many of the patients talked about how strong she was and how great of a therapist she was. The fact is she didn't have a lot of muscle, she just knew how to use her weight and body mechanics in a way she got the most out of her frame. Sure, over time it may factor into her physically, but my point is that it is possible.

My question for you is, WHY do you want to go into the field of PT?

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Ben in Sedona, Arizona

35 months ago

You will almost always be able to elicit help from a fellow employee for difficult transfers. I would not worry too much about your stature. Being athletic will help. Ya know, COTAs( cert. occupational therapists) are in demand and do a lot less transferring and heavy lifting than a PTA. Just a thought!

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jchx19 in Dayton, Ohio

35 months ago

Thank you guys for your quick reply. I really appreciate it.

@PTAstudent in Towson, Maryland - because I want to help people & there is alot of available job.

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PT in Orlando, Florida

34 months ago

PTA might be getting phased out soon. Please do more research before enrolling in PTA programs. RC 3-11 policy may change everything.

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brandon in Nelsonville, Ohio

34 months ago

I have been in PTA school for two quarters now and enjoy it. I have also been voluteering for a while now, and also enjoy that. I have a 4.0, and would like to continue going to school to get my bachelores degree. There is a year waiting list where I am currently attending college. I would like some information on what kind of schooling would be a good idea for me to do on my year off. I would like to work as a PTA for a while but advance to a higher possition like management maybe. I would like to know if anyone has any information on this, or has maybe done somthing like I would like to do.

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Sunflower in Las Vegas, Nevada

34 months ago

PTA in Delta, Pennsylvania said: I am a PTA and working in an inpatient in very stressful. You basically have to know all of the things that you have learned plus about modalites, exercises, manual massagesand other techniques. It is a very demanding field right now, but you have to know your stuff. Outpatient is a little easier, but again there is a lot of information to know. Your best bet is to observe before you make any decisions.

Hi, I'm a PTA graduate from Loma Linda University. I graduated in 2000. However I sat for the boards three times and failed each time. That disappointment has lasted for the last 12 years. I now have the desire to sit again for the boards. I'm looking for some advice in a study plan. Do you have any suggestion? Please help!

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Sunflower in Las Vegas, Nevada

34 months ago

ben in Sedona, Arizona said: I felt the same way. I studied untill I felt there was no more to study. I thought I was well prepared, but had a very tough time on the test. I truly thought there was a good chance I had failed. I did pass, but by a small to medium margin. My final score was extremely close to my practice exams, so pay attention to that score. Take as many practice exams as you can, they are quite reflective of the real exam. The PEAT? Are those the ones from FSBPT? If so, great! Those are very close to the real thing. I took seven practice exams. In the Scorebuilders seminar they told us that if we have a speaking knowledge of all PT topics we should pass. That's what I concentrated on doing. I did not get too bogged down in the details, just able to carry on a general, understandable conversation about any PT topic. Understanding neuro and wounds is important and will help score you some needed points. There are a lot of questions about assistive devices needed for certain levels of spinal injuries and pathologies. Some of the questions are tricky and are asked in a strange manner, but if you know your levels and whats affected and or not affected you should get them correct. Best of luck!

Congrats on passing the PTA exams! I graduated in 2000 from Loma Linda University. I took the exams three times in California and failed. Its been 12 years! I now would like to take the exam again. It's been such a long time I really need some help on a study plan and materials. Can you help me?

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PTA in Enola, Pennsylvania

34 months ago

And if you work IPPT there is a great deal of BM's, and the potential of doing wound care. If you think BM's bad, get a good whiff of pseudomonas aeruginosa!

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PTA in Enola, Pennsylvania

34 months ago

I went to school in Fayetteville Tech, graduated in 2000. At that time the program was very demanding and I imagine it still is today. All of our class passed the NPTE on the first attempt. It is a great career and FTCC is a great school.

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DJ in South Hamilton, Massachusetts

34 months ago

Kyle M in Eugene, Oregon said: Hi I am a recent University of Oregon graduate with a psychology degree, but recently have developed an interest in becoming a physical therapist. I know PT school is hard to get into, and I was just wondering if completing a PTA program would be a good start? Is that a common begining for PT's?

I think that's a great idea...volunteering is often another way to investigate if that is an option. Also there are many online programs that work with local hospitals in the area as well. You can always check out this resource as well <a href="www.studentadvisor.com/pages/physical-therapy-assistant-a-career-overview" StudentAdvisor.com Physical Therapy Assistant Career Overview</a>

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PTAstudent in Towson, Maryland

34 months ago

DJ in South Hamilton, Massachusetts said: I think that's a great idea...volunteering is often another way to investigate if that is an option. Also there are many online programs that work with local hospitals in the area as well. You can always check out this resource as well <a href=" www.studentadvisor.com/pages/physical-therapy-assistant-a-career-overview" StudentAdvisor.com Physical Therapy Assistant Career Overview</a>

DJ, most PTs do not start as PTA's. The fact is the PTA degree will not carry over to your PT degree. If you already have a bachelors i'd work on the pre-req's to the PT program. A lot of them are required of the AA degree so you won't have any lost time. If you do the PTA that will be 2 years, a DPT program is 3 years if you have a bachelors. I'd pursue the PT degree without question over the PTA if you can get in. If you go the PTA route, you will have to start from square 1 and odds are when you graduate you will want to work for a while before starting a PT degree and may never get your PT degree. A lot of PT programs pre-req classes are only good for 5 years as well, so keep that in mind. I am about to finish my PTA degree and know that I want to work atleast 3 years before thinking of advancing my schooling. My options are probably just a masters in healthcare admin. I'd pursue OT, ST, or PT before PTA if you already have a BS degree. Way more options and much less uncertainty.

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Sunflower in Las Vegas, Nevada

34 months ago

Thank you so much for your reply! Unfortunately I have two AA degrees. So I don't know how that will help. So are you saying that me trying to study and take the PTA EXAM again wouldn't be a good route??

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Sunflower in Las Vegas, Nevada

34 months ago

I believe that you should try and apply for the PT program. You already have one degree I think you should just go for it! Good Luck

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Daena in Sugar Land, Texas

34 months ago

Hi. Are there mom's out there who has a 2 or 3 year old child, but still manage and enroll in a 2 yr PTA Program?? I wanted to know if its possible to finish PTA in 2 years with the demand of raising a family as well. I am a stay at home mom now to my 2 1/2 year old son. I am planning to go back to school and take PTA. I already have a Bachelor's Degree but wanted to try a career in health care now. I'm also concerned about my son. I'll most likely put him in Day Care just in case. Thank you.

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Marjorie in Las Vegas, Nevada

33 months ago

Will I be able to get a job if I go to a secondary school that is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools ( ACICS ), and is listed as a nationally recognized accrediting agency by the United States Department of Education and is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). The only school that is American Physical Therapy Association accredited seems to be CSN and they only accept 12 students into the program at a time.

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Brooke in Farmington, Missouri

33 months ago

I'm taking my pre-requisites for the PTA program at the school I am going to. To any current PTAs, how rewarding is this field? I am just nervous about all of this because I just signed up for my classes today and it is a lot to take in at once.

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Jaime8860 in Semmes, Alabama

33 months ago

RR in Newington, Connecticut said: how hard is pta school

I am only speaking from my current experience and I must say that it is tough! It is financially and emotionally taxing. I am finishing up my second semester( about to start 2nd clinical) and then I will have another 9 week clinical. I plan to graduate in July. This program is a 2 year degree and I have not been able to work for the last 8 months. It is very fast paced and there is a lot to learn. If you have the time and the drive to accomplish it then I say GO for it! But don't let any one tell you that it is a walk in the park =)

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Jaime8860 in Semmes, Alabama

33 months ago

Brooke in Farmington, Missouri said: I'm taking my pre-requisites for the PTA program at the school I am going to. To any current PTAs, how rewarding is this field? I am just nervous about all of this because I just signed up for my classes today and it is a lot to take in at once.

Brooke, I have not finished school yet and can already tell you that if you love people and want to help them, you will be rewarded in this career. I have only done observation hours and 2 weeks of clinical and I already know this is what I want to do for the rest of my life. I start my 4 week clinicals one week from today! I will let you know if my mind is changed! lol

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Lana in Portland, Oregon

33 months ago

Jaime8860 in Semmes, Alabama said: Brooke, I have not finished school yet and can already tell you that if you love people and want to help them, you will be rewarded in this career. I have only done observation hours and 2 weeks of clinical and I already know this is what I want to do for the rest of my life. I start my 4 week clinicals one week from today! I will let you know if my mind is changed! lol

Jaime,

Could you please share your experience in getting observation hours done? I can't find a facility which will let me do it.

Thanks a lot!

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Kelsey in Albany, Oregon

32 months ago

Hi,

I am currently doing undergrad from a credited profrom: Exercise and Sport Science: Pre- physical therapy option. When I complete this degree do I still need to go onto PTA school to qualify as a physical therapy assistant? Also, are PTA jobs easy to find?

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Erica in San Antonio, Texas

32 months ago

I really want to become a PTA, but I'm scared that I won't be able to handle the stress of going to school, especially such difficult schooling. I feel like all the cards are stacked against me... I'm bipolar, dyslexic and have ADHD. I have my bipolar disorder under control, but my learning disabilities cause me such anxiety. I also am color deficient, so I have trouble distinguishing between reds and greens.

I have such a passion for learning about the human body and the mechanics of muscles and bones (I'm currently an auto technician), and I love helping people. But the schooling... :(

Has anyone here been able to go to PTA school with learning disabilities? Do schools provide any help? And would my color deficiencies affect my ability to do well? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

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Future PTA in Seattle, Washington

32 months ago

Color deficiencies would certainly not be a problem that I can see, at least not to the extent that it can't easily be worked out. A fellow classmate of mine is colorblind, never once has he had a problem at least that I have seen.

As for your other disabilities, only you can really answer your question. Do you have prior experience in college? If not, you will need to take your prerequisites. I would advise signing up for them at your local community college.

The anatomy prereqs will give you a good idea of what you're looking at. If you do well in those classes, you'll very likely do well in PTA school. If not, hey at least you took the risk and the cost will be incredibly small compared to what you stand to gain. Good luck!

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PTAstudentGraduating in 4 Weeks! in Towson, Maryland

32 months ago

Kelsey in Albany, Oregon said: Hi,

I am currently doing undergrad from a credited profrom: Exercise and Sport Science: Pre- physical therapy option. When I complete this degree do I still need to go onto PTA school to qualify as a physical therapy assistant? Also, are PTA jobs easy to find?

Kelsey, i'm not sure what a "profrom" is, but if you are doing an Bachelors degree in Exer and Sports Science, that is a degree in itself. So yes, if you for some reason want to become a PTA, you would need to go to a PTA program and complete a 2 year AA degree. As far as jobs, well, if really depends on the area. Companies higher PTs 10:1 over PTA's. I have noticed more OP jobs out there but the hours can be as late as 9pm some nights. A ton more people are seeking out an AA degree now so in the near future it will be harder to find jobs. Also the role of the PTA is still in question. If you have a bachelors in Exer Science and have the pre-req's done for PT school. I'd HIGHLY recommend going to PT school over PTA school. There is so much more upside on $, jobs, and career advancement.

Let me know if you have any more questions. Good luck.

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Erica in San Antonio, Texas

32 months ago

Future PTA in Seattle, Washington said: Color deficiencies would certainly not be a problem that I can see, at least not to the extent that it can't easily be worked out. A fellow classmate of mine is colorblind, never once has he had a problem at least that I have seen.

As for your other disabilities, only you can really answer your question. Do you have prior experience in college? If not, you will need to take your prerequisites. I would advise signing up for them at your local community college.

The anatomy prereqs will give you a good idea of what you're looking at. If you do well in those classes, you'll very likely do well in PTA school. If not, hey at least you took the risk and the cost will be incredibly small compared to what you stand to gain. Good luck!

Thanks for your response about the color blindness. :) That's good to know. No, I've never been to college. I had a lot of difficulty in high school (I did get my GED, though), so I didn't think I could pass college. However, I didn't know what I wanted to do with college. I'm hoping that, if I have a definite goal, I could do it. I'm still extremely scared though. Everyone on this forum talks about how difficult PTA school is, and I think just regular school is hard!!

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Future PTA in Seattle, Washington

32 months ago

Sign up for Anatomy I. That class will give you a very good idea whether or not you can make it through. Remember that school is as much about how much work you put in as how smart. A smart person with no work ethic is going to be worse off than someone who is willing to fully dedicate themselves and put it the time. I think judging by your writing you can do it if you put your mind to it and fully dedicate yourself. Good luck!

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PTAstudentGraduating in 4 Weeks! in Towson, Maryland

32 months ago

Future PTA in Seattle, Washington said: Sign up for Anatomy I. That class will give you a very good idea whether or not you can make it through. Remember that school is as much about how much work you put in as how smart. A smart person with no work ethic is going to be worse off than someone who is willing to fully dedicate themselves and put it the time. I think judging by your writing you can do it if you put your mind to it and fully dedicate yourself. Good luck!

Erica,

Not sure why you are choosing PTA, but the medical degrees tend to be more science based. I will say that we had many folks do well in the AP 1 and 2 and did not pass the program. The program is a lot packed in a short period of time. If you are dedicated and read ahead, get tutoring, and a good study group it will help. I'd say start taking your pre-req's, it will give you confidence and an idea of what school is going to be like. Just expect the PTA program to be faster paced than the AP's and be more clinically based.

Good luck!

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codi in Mishawaka, Indiana

32 months ago

VballGirl15 in West Lafayette, Indiana said: I am finishing my bachelor's degree at Purdue University (not interested working in my degree field anymore...just happy I made it through PU). I have a cumulative GPA of 2.8. Most PTA schools require that I have a GPA of at least 2.5. Seeing as I meet the requirements (GPA, observation hours, pre-reqs), is there any reason why I wouldn't get accepted to a PTA school? Have people experienced a lot of rejection letters from PTA schools despite meeting the requirements? This is the only thing concerning me - that I'll apply for PTA school, get rejected and then not know what to do next with my life.

so I see it has been almost two years since you posted this comment. I was wondering if you ever pursued your interest in the pta program. I am looking into getting into the pta program myself.

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Demond PTA student in New Orleans, Louisiana

31 months ago

Just a bit curious can someome advise me on an approximate length it would take to be a actual PT after becoming a PTA.

Also, what kind of jobs in a physical therapy or rehab field are avail to those with no experience or degree? Basically, I want to use the job as a learning tool/ stepping stone.

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Future PTA in Seattle, Washington

31 months ago

You can become an aide without an education. The pay is pretty low, but you'll get an idea of what people do in the PT world. The PTA is not a shortcut to the PT degree. It will take you 4 years (1 year of prereqs plus 3 years for DPT) following the PTA degree.

If you don't already have a Bachelors degree, you'll need that before entering the PT program. So that would tack on at least another 2 years on top of the 4.

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Leroy in Las Vegas, Nevada

31 months ago

stretchem in Fort Lauderdale, Florida said: check with the board of PT

Tes CSN and Carrington are both currently active with LPTA programs.

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Elaine in Athens, Georgia

31 months ago

Is anyone on here a PT who started out as a PTA (or know somebody who took that route)? I'm curious about how they did with the shift in responsibilities. Were they surprised by the amount of paperwork they had to do, and did they actually spend significantly less time with the patients?

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hmckay in Addison, Texas

30 months ago

Hello! I am 38 never been to college. Never really been a good student in my younger days. I have my cosmetology lic. I am thinking of going to Tarrant County, for PTA...thoughts? They say i have to take an accuplacer test, is that hard? They also only take the highest scored...can you take the test more than once. How does this work exactly

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Sole in St. Clouds in Fort Pierce, Florida

30 months ago

I am attempting to re-enter the PTA program--for the 3rd time. Any insight how that would look to a program director of the school. I feel truly uneasy about it. I love the whole learning experiences and feel that this is the path I want to stay in. How high can I keep my hopes up?

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Future PTA in Seattle, Washington

30 months ago

Well I don't think the program director would let you back in for the third time if they didn't want you there...

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99bottles in Phoenix, Arizona

7 months ago

Colorado , for the most part, does not utilize PTAs. Low pay compared to other states too.

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andy85 in San Francisco, California

7 months ago

I am interested in applying to any PTA programs in California.

I plan to take PTA 101 at Ohlone College. For those who are in Ohlone College's PTA program: What do you guys think of it? Is the program/faculty good? I may look at Sacramento City College, as well.

I may consider private schools like Gurnick Academy and Carrington College, but they all seem to be pretty brand new.

Any input will help. Thanks!

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Davey in Austin, Texas

7 months ago

andy85 in San Francisco, California said: I am interested in applying to any PTA programs in California.

I plan to take PTA 101 at Ohlone College. For those who are in Ohlone College's PTA program: What do you guys think of it? Is the program/faculty good? I may look at Sacramento City College, as well.

I may consider private schools like Gurnick Academy and Carrington College, but they all seem to be pretty brand new.

Any input will help. Thanks!

I've heard through the grape vine that PTA jobs in California are almost impossible to find these days. It's the same way here in Texas. Have you thought about getting your ATC certification. I have a few PTA friends who left the field and became personal trainers on their own and are doing quite well. With so many people flooding the market, it's already overly saturated.

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andy85 in San Jose, California

6 months ago

Davey in Austin, Texas said: I've heard through the grape vine that PTA jobs in California are almost impossible to find these days. It's the same way here in Texas. Have you thought about getting your ATC certification. I have a few PTA friends who left the field and became personal trainers on their own and are doing quite well. With so many people flooding the market, it's already overly saturated.

Thanks for your insight, Davey.

I've been looking at the workforce development websites and Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), and they are saying that PTAs are one of the careers that are rising til the 2020 (and possibly beyond). Would think they just grabbed data from a sample size, rather than as a whole?

I really want to pursue a PTA program/degree, but with what people are saying, it seems pretty bleak...

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90 in Rochester, New York

6 months ago

Andy - A lot of gloomy talk about future of PTAs in this forum. I'll preface by saying it is by no means my dream job but the PTAs I've shadowed seem to really love their work and get their hours in (PRN 99% of the time but what can you do.) All allied health professions have their complaints about saturation, ect. At least as a PTA you can likely work semi-normal business hours. Anyway, I think the profession still has the glimmer of opportunity for a promising future so I'm starting a program this fall and hoping for the best.

I don't know much about California's job market for PTAs but I know this area and I am likely relocating soon after graduation unless I receive an job offer through clinicals. I'm pretty sure the days of graduating from your neighborhood college and finding a 9to5 20 mins from your current home are numbered. Doesn't really matter where you are. Most people I know are looking for homes close to their jobs not jobs close to their homes

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