Starting a new career at 40

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Mr Alman in Plainville, Connecticut

67 months ago

I'm a 40 year old male looking for a new career in cvt or ultrasonography. I've heard that this career move not suggested for males let alone being 40 going to school for a new career.
Are there many males in this career?
Is it harder for me to get a job at 40

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mike in Las Vegas, Nevada

67 months ago

I just graduated from the ultrasound program here in las vegas and Im 35..I did the general track.. if you go to school for ultrasound, make sure the school is a credited. I truly think its a great career.

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mike in Las Vegas, Nevada

67 months ago

go to a community college..
go to this website and find the closest school. www.caahep.org/
they will be able to tell u which school is closest to u..

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KateinUltrasound in Timbuck2

67 months ago

At least a 1/3 of my class are male, and most of them are 40 or over. I don't think any of them believe it's a female profession. Go for it!

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Mr Alman in Plainville, Connecticut

67 months ago

I,ve checked articles and stats. They say that most hospitals frown on a male sonographer because they have to pay for another person to be in the room with a female to avoid any lawsuites. also
that 85% of female customers prefer a female sonographer.

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RTstudent in Akron, Ohio

67 months ago

What about all the male doctors out there? Does a female nurse or assistant have to be in the room if he's with a female patient?? Or a male Nurse, he's not allowed to be alone with a female patient? Doesn't make sense to me but I've not done any research...

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mike in Las Vegas, Nevada

67 months ago

Well when u do a testicular exam u wont need a chaperone..besides, you can always work for a vascular lab/ surgeon..don't listen to forgetmyusernamehehe in Woodside, New York.

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jay in Trenton, Michigan

67 months ago

I am 55 and laid off. Trying to go back to school for ultrasound technician jobs. I also have a B.S degree. Am I too old for this?

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FreeFalln in Plainsboro, New Jersey

67 months ago

NO YOUR NOT TOO OLD. YOUR TOO WORRIED....HAVE FUN.

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mac1 in Arkansas

66 months ago

Mr Alman in Plainville, Connecticut said: I'm a 40 year old male looking for a new career in cvt or ultrasonography. I've heard that this career move not suggested for males let alone being 40 going to school for a new career.
Are there many males in this career?
Is it harder for me to get a job at 40

I had several male students in my ultrasound class and they were excellent techs. One of them was mid-30's, another over 40; both seemed to do well and were well accepted by peers and techs in the clinical setting. Really the only scans you would likely not be allowed to learn/do are the breast exams, but some places the male techs do everything just like the female techs do. The hospital where I did my training had several male techs. Don't let your age or being a male stop you from going into US, but please check out the market in your area, because jobs are few and far in some areas. I'm not sure if the market is flooded or if its due to the economy. Plan to get registered, if you do US, at least in abdomen and vascular, as many places won't hire unless you have vascular registry.

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sandy2 in Allendale, Michigan

66 months ago

I have known people to start over and do quite well over 40. So there you have it. Best of luck to you. And please wish me luck also. I really would appreciate the positive vibes being that I need all the help I can get from anywhere I can get the help.

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Clay in Salt Lake City, Utah

65 months ago

Absolutely DO IT! I personally would never allow a female tech to give me a testicular sonogram. We need more men because testicular sonograms are something females should NOT be doing.

"85% of female customers prefer a female sonographer"

By all means, honor their demands. Why should men get a choice of gender, their modesty and dignity doesn't matter.

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NorahBelle in Litchfield, Illinois

62 months ago

I agree that people frown upon males getting into this field, but I really don't understand why. My husband is a Rad Tech, and when he was going to school, in IL, he was informed that Mammography was not a modality which was open to him, that only females could train for this. Men are allowed to become sonographers in IL, but the school he attended told him that no hospital would train him for ultrasound, because he was male. The problem now is that we are trying to move out of state, and many of the job openings we are finding require mamm certification and/or sonography skills. Pretty sexist that he was unable to train for this because of his gender, but it's preventing him from working now! Also, some of the other posters make good points about the testicular US; my friend who is a US tech told me that many male patients are very dismayed to find out that there is no male tech to perform these exams!

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Tammy in Columbia City, Indiana

58 months ago

For all of you women who have "no problem" going to a male gynecologists, why would you have a problem with a male doing your mammogram?

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blueocean1963@aol in Branford, Connecticut

57 months ago

Hi my name is chris im a 48 yr old male looking to make the same switch your thinking of.I was wondering what you have found out.Here is my e mail

clillquist@aol.com

thanx chris

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Really in Homosassa, Florida

57 months ago

Tammy in Columbia City, Indiana said: For all of you women who have "no problem" going to a male gynecologists, why would you have a problem with a male doing your mammogram?

I seriously doubt that the women who will go to the male gynecologist are the ones complaining about the male sonographer. As far as chaperones, I think this will become the new standard for the protection of both the doctor and the patient. I always get my yearly exam. In the last 4 years I've had 1 male doctor and the other 3 were women. For ALL of them(yes, this means for the female doctors as well), a chaperone was in the room for the pelvic exam. The most recent visit was just 2 weeks ago with a woman doctor. The female nurse was brought in when it was time for the PAP. It will not surprise me if this becomes the rule for these other tests involving sexual organs. If this does become the case, it should require the chaperone regardless of gender.

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win in Corona, California

57 months ago

I graduated an US program at 40 and don't regret it. Go for it regardless of your age. The one thing you must do is go to a CAAHEP accredited school or you will not have a career at all. Please learn from the many people before you who went to an unaccredited school. Unaccredited schools will tell you anything you want to hear. It is a must to go to a CAAHEP accredited school. Good Luck...

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Orinda in Los Angeles, California

57 months ago

I disagree. I know several people that are ARDMS certified,that
have jobs who went to a NON-CAHEEP school.

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imageman in Bryan, Ohio

57 months ago

Jomacp in Canton, Massachusetts said: I need a change in careers and not sure if Sonography is right for me. I'm 46 with no college degree. I haven't taken a math course since high school.

How can I find out if I'm cut out for Sonography?

Go for it! I started back at age 47 with no algebra experience at all. Started with basic algebra all the way up to college algebra and ultrasound physics. Passed the physics registry too. I had to have some tutoring, but if you have the desire, not much can hold you back. I threw myself into to it with all that I had and graduated from a major university with honors at age 50. This is from a guy that barely graduated from high school.

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win in San Diego, California

57 months ago

I understand that some people do go to non-caahep schools and get jobs but they are by far the minority as even seen here on this forum. I think it is irresponsible to suggest anyone go to a non caahep school in this economic climate was the reason for my comment. By going to a non caahep school you will be fighting an uphill battle. Please know that if you choose to go to a non caahep school and you do not have a BA, BS, or higher degree you will have to have a years experience of 35 hours a week for 48 weeks in order to get your ARDMS credential. It is nearly impossible to get a job without ARDMS now. I am saying this not to be negative but only to help people choose the best way to have a career in ultrasound. Best of luck and do your research!!

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Orinda in Los Angeles, California

57 months ago

I agree to everything you say,but in your initial comment,you
did not mention prior education.I would not suggest a non-caheep
school to anyone without a four-year educational background. It's
almost imposible to think it won't be a up hill battle.

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shortperson_7@yahoo.com in Hollywood, Florida

57 months ago

Mr Alman in Plainville, Connecticut said: I'm a 40 year old male looking for a new career in cvt or ultrasonography. I've heard that this career move not suggested for males let alone being 40 going to school for a new career.
Are there many males in this career?
Is it harder for me to get a job at 40

You are not treated the same if you are a bit older trust me on this

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Andy in Phoenix, Arizona

57 months ago

I was thinking of applying for an rad tech program and, as part of the application process, I had to do a hospital shadow. The mentor asked me what modalities I was interested in and I told him CT and ultrasound. He said CT is not a problem, but sonography would be hard to get into. I asked what do you mean, hard to get into to shadow, or a hard modality in general to get into? He said that because I'm a guy, the chances of getting into sonography aren't that good, at least at the hospitals here in my area. And this was at one of the most recognized hospitals in the country. I felt discouraged, so I called the rad depts. at a few other hospitals and was basically told the same thing. So, just a word of advice for those men reading this thread who are only interested in ultrasound...arrange for a job shadow first so you can ask questions in person. You might save yourself a lot of time and money in training only to find out you can't get hired.

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ultranewbie in sunnyvale, California

57 months ago

yes, i agree. it's really not the hospitals, it's the public in general. i was really dismayed, being in the state of CA, in the bay area, and there are hospitals/clinics that are high-end.

the patients started doing this, and i was appalled that the high-end clinics had allowed this to happen.

There are certain cultures that prefer - "their own culture" to do their exam. Middle Eastern, and if you're in certain areas, Folks from India. Chinese and Japanese. The patients state they are far more "comfortable speaking in their own native tongue, and would deal with people who are already familiar with their culture."

Then of course, we have the white patrons asking for "white, english speaking" techs. I kid you not. This too, has been appeased in certain locations.

I interviewed for a job in Fremont. I was asked if i speak "Hindi".. Cantonese, or Farsi. When i went into the waiting room, there were only Eastern Indians in there, and Asian.

I told them, my second language was Spanish. Especially being in Southern California. The interviewer kind of chuckled. And i was never called back.

What it comes down to, is not our personal beliefs of who should be seen by whom, it's who's paying the money to be seen. If 85% of females prefer to be seen by a female, and their insurance covers it, then there's no argument - unless you're footing the bill.

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vanese in Port Arthur, Texas

56 months ago

ultranewbie in Half Moon Bay, California said: rt student..yes, when a woman is getting a breast exam or pap smear, or pelvic a female chaperon darn well better be in the room. at least here in california. even if the higher levels, as an sonographer, i have seen female patients refuse to have their breast biopsied by a male radiologist, in x-ray, i have seen females refuse to have their B.E. tipped by a male RT.

and let's not "go there" when it comes to mammography.. There are a handful of male mammographers that i know of, that can do a mammogram w/o a female chaperone, but - they have to give the patient the option of having one before the exam. it's not easy for many males in the field, mainly due to the patient/female comfort level with males.

unfortunately, there have been doctors, and male nurses/sonographers in the field of medicine in general who have misbehaved..I happened to be working with a guy who said something totally inappropriate to a female patient during a transvag. while i was scanning in the next room..our only partition was a curtain. I talked to him personally about it later..and of course, the patient complained. they let him off the hook the first time, but then he slipped up again - with a chaperone in the room..so, they finally let him go...

Here in california, males have to be more careful due to the fact that this is the land of lawsuits. Folks will lie, for no reason - or for money, and without a witness in the room to back the poor male - he's toast - and so is his career.

but when he's a great sonographer, his work ethics speak for themselves..and they really go far in this field.

Same here in Texas if there's a male doc doing exams a female nurse or med assistant is present in the room ALWAYS!!

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vanese in Port Arthur, Texas

56 months ago

Tammy in Columbia City, Indiana said: For all of you women who have "no problem" going to a male gynecologists, why would you have a problem with a male doing your mammogram?

Me personally, I don't care male or female. I use to be a bit inhibited that is until I got pregnant – after being poked, prodded, tugged, and yanked on all that went out of the window.;-)...I now see all health care workers as "professionals" whether male or female....I use to think that I'd only go to a female gyno thinking that since they were female they'd understand me both mentally and physically that is until the female doc I was seeing contributed to my miscarriage. I then sought out another doctor that so happened to have been a male doctor who was excellent! And helped me to carry my high-risk pregnancy to term by taking several precautions.

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c_inside_u in Orlando, Florida

54 months ago

-Where I trained, there was only 1 female sonographer and she primarily performed echoes. The other 5 sonographers were men. Now, I am the only female sonographer at my site with a male OB/GYN doc.
-Gentlemen, Chaperones are a must for any study that a patient has to remove an article of clothing.
-As for the age, it seems to me that the students I have helped train, a lot of maturing comes with age (usually). There is a huge difference between an 18 y.o. and a 45+ y.o. student. I personally would rather have someone who is truly wanting be a sonographer as a coworker than someone who is full of drama. Plus, an older adult typically has a family to support and has the potential of being a more reliable employee.
-I think men have less hindrance if they learn the skills to perform abdominal, vascular, and cardiac studies.
-It is not impossible. I wish you the best of luck!

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Anne

54 months ago

I recently had a lump in my breast and at the time was so poor that I received county health. I'm 40 and the mammogram was useless so they sent me next door for a breast sonogram. I was truly appalled when I was told it would be a male tech but assumed a female would be present. When he walked in by himself and told me to take off my bra, I just assumed that when he came back a woman would be with him. There was no woman and I was too afraid that if I asked about it I wouldn't get the test. This was the county hospital, not private, and I was scared. The tech was so nervous that he told me his name four times. There was something very strange about the whole scene; a man ordering me to take my bra off...me lying with my breast bared on a table while a strange guy squirted gel on my breast...He was silent the whole time and never spoke to me, was afraid to look at me. You could feel the energy in the room, sexual or otherwise,not normal and highly sexual for me in a not-good way. My breasts are my sexual organs; I have more feeling there than my vagina and me having a breast sonogram by a guy is the same as a guy having a penis sonogram by a woman.
The whole thing reeked of weird power and control and left me highly traumatized, I had to seek counseling and for weeks afterwards I was locked in that small room with a guy named Philip looking at my naked breasts.
I will never again let any man see my breasts in a medical setting again. Oh, he won, btw, as I was too traumatized too complain that he didn't offer a chaperone, if there is such a thing as a "law" that says I'm entitled in CA.

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Trace

54 months ago

You obviously went into medicine because you are so compasionate.
You will make A great governmental employee
once Obamacare is passed.
Who are you to attack this lady? Does it make you feel
Better about yourself to tear someone else down?

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Sheron in Hollywood, Florida

54 months ago

Hello all,

I am a 40 year old woman who have been laid off/unemployed since September 2008. I too like many of this forum is returning back to school for the first time in more years than I care to remember. I have the support and encouragement of my wonderful husband, but sometimes I wonder if I will make a great tech...I am excited and a little bit scared. I do not have any college education, but I am determine to make it. This will be a career change for me, hopefully a good one. Are there any ultrasound techs out there (new or seasoned) than can offer me any advice or encouragement of what to except? What is the courses like? What is it like on a daily basis at work? I would appreciate all responses.
Thanks, Sheron

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truthful in Paramus, New Jersey

54 months ago

Anne said: I recently had a lump in my breast and at the time was so poor that I received county health. I'm 40 and the mammogram was useless so they sent me next door for a breast sonogram. I was truly appalled when I was told it would be a male tech but assumed a female would be present. When he walked in by himself and told me to take off my bra, I just assumed that when he came back a woman would be with him. There was no woman and I was too afraid that if I asked about it I wouldn't get the test. This was the county hospital, not private, and I was scared. The tech was so nervous that he told me his name four times. There was something very strange about the whole scene; a man ordering me to take my bra off...me lying with my breast bared on a table while a strange guy squirted gel on my breast...He was silent the whole time and never spoke to me, was afraid to look at me. You could feel the energy in the room, sexual or otherwise,not normal and highly sexual for me in a not-good way. My breasts are my sexual organs; I have more feeling there than my vagina and me having a breast sonogram by a guy is the same as a guy having a penis sonogram by a woman.
The whole thing reeked of weird power and control and left me highly traumatized, I had to seek counseling and for weeks afterwards I was locked in that small room with a guy named Philip looking at my naked breasts.
I will never again let any man see my breasts in a medical setting again. Oh, he won, btw, as I was too traumatized too complain that he didn't offer a chaperone, if there is such a thing as a "law" that says I'm entitled in CA.

What you could have done is ask for a female sonographer when you saw him. The male tech was uncomfortable as much as you are because he is afraid of losing his job, facing a lawsuit from you, and that you are a woman. He did his job as professionally as he could unfortunately he might have been the only one there.

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truthful in Paramus, New Jersey

54 months ago

From the way you stared at him or make him feel, it didn't make the conditions any better. You should have asked for a female sonographer to do the exam, but he should have asked someone to be in the same room with you; however, I bet everyone was busy at that time and he was the only sonographer available. There are very good male sonographers out there and who are professional but they also get crazy patients who are out there to cause trouble, but I am not saying you are. I just hope for his sake that you are not the type to complain even from your words, that he did the exam as professional as he could with a nervous patient like yourself. To be truthful, did he harrass you physically? If not, then he did his job. Besides, losing one's job or A LICENSE due to a complain that wasn't justified is very unfair esp when you are doing your job. FYI, he didn't look at you because he was nervous and he needs to see what he is scanning and find where the pathology is in the breasts in a clockwise motion for the radiologists to dx. FYI, the mammogram wasn't useless. It was because your breasts were too dense to specify any calcifications or any abnormalities in the film. Hope this helps you. With all honesty, he did his job but next time ask for a female technologist.

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justultrasound in Nashville, Tennessee

54 months ago

From what I've witnessed the cards are stacked against you because of age and gender.

Mr Alman in Plainville, Connecticut said: I'm a 40 year old male looking for a new career in cvt or ultrasonography. I've heard that this career move not suggested for males let alone being 40 going to school for a new career.
Are there many males in this career?
Is it harder for me to get a job at 40

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uke688

54 months ago

I work in a hospital. I think all of us (techs and nurses and docs) should remember that medical care is supposed to be about the patient NOT us. It should be about the patient, providing the best care while still making sure they are comfortable and their privacy and modesty is respected. I have noticed an appalling lack of respect in recent years for patient's privacy and I think it's really too bad. During an exam, the patient's feelings and comfort should come first,not the tech or nurses. This is how I like to be treated - with respect - when I myself am a patient.

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Nothing that Concerns You in NoWhere

54 months ago

I work in a hospital, and an office. Although it is supposed to be about patient care it is really about the bottom line. One is naive to think otherwise. I feel it is society as a whole that is regressing toward jungle law.

We all want to be treated with respect as a patient but if it does not help keep the lights on, forget it. I've seen ER admissions far more interested in documenting an insured Patient's wife's ability to pay before insulin shock, or diabetic coma treatment while a whole crew was around a street urchin with an abscessed needle track was screaming for pain meds.

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Trace

54 months ago

It is a strawman argument to say it must be a choice
between treating patients respectfully or making a profit.
Good practioners do both.

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dfr110 in Seminole, Texas

53 months ago

Sheron in Hollywood, Florida said: Hello all,

I am a 40 year old woman who have been laid off/unemployed since September 2008. I too like many of this forum is returning back to school for the first time in more years than I care to remember. I have the support and encouragement of my wonderful husband, but sometimes I wonder if I will make a great tech...I am excited and a little bit scared. I do not have any college education, but I am determine to make it. This will be a career change for me, hopefully a good one. Are there any ultrasound techs out there (new or seasoned) than can offer me any advice or encouragement of what to except? What is the courses like? What is it like on a daily basis at work? I would appreciate all responses.
Thanks, Sheron

I have just recently started US school in Jan. 2010. I am slready trained as a radiologic technologist and additionally have learned to perform CTs. School it not easy. You must learn upfront the basic cold or you will be quickly lost. An excellent understanding of anotomy and physiology will be critical to your success as well as knowing college algebra. You must have good eye hand coordination and have good visual recall. I love it so far and am doing well.

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shortperson_7@yahoo.com in Hollywood, Florida

53 months ago

quite a few people that dont even know their anatomy well are working for a long time as techs so you figure

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arifur rahman in Avenel, New Jersey

50 months ago

I reallt regret myself for going to non credited school as a male. now I understand It is very hard to get a us job as a male and get certificate from non credited school

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byrdman in Pensacola, Florida

50 months ago

arifur rahman in Avenel, New Jersey said: I reallt regret myself for going to non credited school as a male. now I understand It is very hard to get a us job as a male and get certificate from non credited school

i graduated from u/s school a 2 yr prog, i have been applying for months for a job and i am registered, i have not had 1 interview, on the other hand every female i graduated with has had interview or have gotten jobs... i am qualified to do the job, but the response by most id they will keep resume on file, or position is filled, or i do not meet the criteria they are looking for. bs every where i turn, i think im gonna go back to college to be a RN....

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Jgizzy in Duluth, Minnesota

40 months ago

I was having extreme pain in one of my testicles, and being the paranoid person that I am, I went to the urologist for an exam. He felt the small pea sized lump that I told him about, and ordered a testicular ultrasound (or whatever the correct term is). I went in there to lay on the table when a cute 40yr old blonde woman walked in. A quick flash of mild panic went flashing through my mind as I realized I was going to have to show this lady 'my stuff'. After a minute or two, when the cold gel was applied (burrr!) and the sound device was applied and searching that elusive lump, the lady technician was so chill and informal that it put me at ease. I feel that sometimes a strictly "professional" energy promotes a feeling of uneasiness, especially in certain times of vulnerability. In that sense, I really appreciated how indifferent she was while doing this testicle exam, alone, in a quiet dark room when a striking young man (lol). Near the end of the examination, when a male doctor came in to double check the tech's findings, I actually felt more uneasy with him in the room. In the end, it's all about how the two energies of myself and the tech.

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Appearence is everything in Tiverton, Ontario

39 months ago

If you look like G. Clooney; go for it!

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Nick L in Medford, Massachusetts

35 months ago

Mr Alman in Plainville, Connecticut said: I'm a 40 year old male looking for a new career in cvt or ultrasonography. I've heard that this career move not suggested for males let alone being 40 going to school for a new career.
Are there many males in this career?
Is it harder for me to get a job at 40

Yes because you will be competing with those in their early 20's for 'entry level' jobs. Typically entry level isn't done by older people unless they have serious issues.

Remember that perception always wins over fact

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Nick L in Medford, Massachusetts

35 months ago

mike in Las Vegas, Nevada said: I just graduated from the ultrasound program here in las vegas and Im 35..I did the general track.. if you go to school for ultrasound, make sure the school is a credited. I truly think its a great career.

Did you get a job?? That is what matters... Every school will blow smoke up your arse but they are living in the land of fantasy & unicorns.

I heard that the oldest 'entry level' person in this field is usually around 28. AT 35 or 40 you are supposed to be established in your career and on a mgmt track.

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collhic in Oxon Hill, Maryland

34 months ago

Jgizzy in Duluth, Minnesota said: I was having extreme pain in one of my testicles, and being the paranoid person that I am, I went to the urologist for an exam. He felt the small pea sized lump that I told him about, and ordered a testicular ultrasound (or whatever the correct term is). I went in there to lay on the table when a cute 40yr old blonde woman walked in. A quick flash of mild panic went flashing through my mind as I realized I was going to have to show this lady 'my stuff'. After a minute or two, when the cold gel was applied (burrr!) and the sound device was applied and searching that elusive lump, the lady technician was so chill and informal that it put me at ease. I feel that sometimes a strictly "professional" energy promotes a feeling of uneasiness, especially in certain times of vulnerability. In that sense, I really appreciated how indifferent she was while doing this testicle exam, alone, in a quiet dark room when a striking young man (lol). Near the end of the examination, when a male doctor came in to double check the tech's findings, I actually felt more uneasy with him in the room. In the end, it's all about how the two energies of myself and the tech.

Go figure, a guy who becomes comfortable with a woman looking at his "stuff" but then gets uneasy when the male doctor walks in to do the same. Male workers in health care really get a bad rap from both sexes...

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Kayla@Georgia in Temple, Georgia

33 months ago

Nick L in Medford, Massachusetts said: Did you get a job?? That is what matters... Every school will blow smoke up your arse but they are living in the land of fantasy & unicorns.

I heard that the oldest 'entry level' person in this field is usually around 28. AT 35 or 40 you are supposed to be established in your career and on a mgmt track.

Unless the economy kills your very successful business of almost 20 years, you get a divorce, and now have to start over from the ground up. I ain't nothing but stubborn, I know I can do this, plus I don't look/feel my age!!

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K.Conley in Duncanville, Texas

33 months ago

I am a 37 year old male finishing up my classes to apply to 2 rad tech programs and most of my classmates are over 30 and are on the road to applying for many different allied health programs, mainly nursing. Due to the economy people are loosing jobs and small business owners are going back to school to start new careers, I honestly think that if you are passionate about a career in the medical field you should go for it, if you are still alive and healthy you and willing to fight through the tough competition and admissions process don't give up!

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sonolookingtogrow in North Las Vegas, Nevada

29 months ago

mike in Las Vegas, Nevada said: I just graduated from the ultrasound program here in las vegas and Im 35..I did the general track.. if you go to school for ultrasound, make sure the school is a credited. I truly think its a great career.

What school did you go to?

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mel in Salt Lake City, Utah

26 months ago

collhic in Oxon Hill, Maryland said: Go figure, a guy who becomes comfortable with a woman looking at his "stuff" but then gets uneasy when the male doctor walks in to do the same. Male workers in health care really get a bad rap from both sexes...

I think his point was that it's the person's demeanor that matters, not the gender.

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arifur rahman in South River, New Jersey

26 months ago

I just wanna tell the male who wants to be ultrasound tech or CVT tech , It is very tough for a male tech to get a job.Even though this profession nothing wrong for male. Because when male scan they have to more concern about getting view and pathologhy not to see the body what anyway you can see many places. but most of the female patient feel uncomfortable with male tech thats why most of the facility dont want to hire male tech. thouhgh they will not say directly to you.

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