veterinarian

Comments (4)

mjs4426 in Flint, Michigan

44 months ago

If I go to college for 4 years for a veterinarian technician can I go to be a veterinarian later?

CindyRVT in Henderson, Texas

44 months ago

It may be possible, but you would have to contact the veterinary medical college you are planning to attend to see if they would accept a bachelors degree in veterinary technology as one of the prereqs for enrollment. Typically they require a bachelors degree in something like biology or animal science and since bachelors degree programs in veterinary technology are so new they may not have considered whether or not it would be acceptable.

mjs4426 in Flint, Michigan

44 months ago

CindyRVT in Henderson, Texas said: It may be possible, but you would have to contact the veterinary medical college you are planning to attend to see if they would accept a bachelors degree in veterinary technology as one of the prereqs for enrollment. Typically they require a bachelors degree in something like biology or animal science and since bachelors degree programs in veterinary technology are so new they may not have considered whether or not it would be acceptable.

thank you so much

itropicbird in Valley Center, California

36 months ago

mjs4426 in Flint, Michigan said: If I go to college for 4 years for a veterinarian technician can I go to be a veterinarian later?

You certainly can! However, you will end up with many more years of schooling than a typical Veterinarian. Technician programs may discourage students from using them as a stepping stone to the DVM degree, simply because they do not wish their time and money invested producing technicians, to be lost to graduates who plan on leaving the pool by advancing into a doctors.

For myself, as a Technician, I began yearning for the opportunity to "call the shots", especially if I felt clients should have been treated differently or a pet's treatment was approached in a more thoughtful way. So, after several more years of prerequisites and job experience (in a variety of fields, not just veterinary medicine), I was accepted into a Veterinary College, from which I graduated over 20 years ago. One of the advantages was being way ahead of the pack in clinical skills, which many doctors may never master, such as phlebotomy, animal restraint, and client communication skills. Since one of the mantras of Veterinary Technicians is "NEVER let the doctor (or anyone else) get bitten", I became quite accomplished in animal behavior/nonverbal communication as a Tech, which has made my hospital a safer place for my staff and clients as a Veterinarian. Also, being a tech prior to application to a Veterinary College ensures that you are realistic about what Veterinary Medicine entails, including the academic, emotional and physical challenges that are encountered daily.

Don't forget however, that deficiencies in GPA, attention to detail and social and management skills (that will emerge during the interview process) are so important that they will usurp any prior training and experience you have accumulated if the Vet School committee feels you are better at following than leading, or if your problem-solving skills are lacking.

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