Starting out...

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (10)

Host

How did you get your start doing veterinary technician work, and what career moves did you make to get to your current position?

Do you need a particular educational background?

Reply - Report abuse

CA Vet Tech in San Francisco, California

80 months ago

I started out, 10 years ago, as a Receptionist then became a Technician Assistant.. I worked with unlicensed techs and licensed techs both having the same skill set and knowledge... both teaching me what they know. I could never tell the difference. The doctors never treated them differently. The RVT's were called Veterinary Technician just the same as the unlicensed technicians.
Since then, I have worked as an Emergency Vet Tech, a general practice Vet Tech, a Laboratory(diagnostics)/Radiology Tech, a Shelter Vet Tech and a Relief Tech. Most recently I trained as a Lab Tech (Mammalian Toxicology Tech at Stanford Research International Bio-Science facility)
(Con't next post)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

CA Vet Tech in San Francisco, California

80 months ago

Currently am learning all I can about Hospital Management. I have been taught, and taught myself, so much over the years. I held the same positions (or superior positions) as the RVT's that I worked with and make comparable salaries (currently 38k/year). I have been given the title Veterinary Technician and am proud of that. Should I feel I do not deserve it? Maybe.
I know I do not know everything, and we all want to know all we can. For myself I'd like specifically to know more about large animals for instance. I am passionate about seeking out new professional experiences. Also, I feel strongly about continuing education and trust my C.E. certifications will help fill in the gaps and refine my skill set.
Soon I will take the CA state board and have the RVT title (with out a traditional 2 year A.S. degree, but via the "alternate route- category 4"). I feel this will give me a sense of accomplishment. My co workers ask WHY I want to study and take an exam to get licensed if I am already where I want to be... and I have to stop and explain:
Because: I want to be the best at what I do. I know it's only a title and my job description would change little, but if I can I should. Why not!?
Not being an RVT makes me have to prove myself to every veterinary professional I meet at first... where as if I was an RVT, I

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

CA Vet Tech in San Francisco, California

80 months ago

I wouldn't have to struggle quite so much. 10 years ago I was an "assistant". Today I DO think I have earned the title "Veterinary Technician". Soon it won’t matter because I WILL BE LICENSED!
What a relief that will be to be RVT!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Alli in Brooklyn, New York

55 months ago

I am a vet tech of 5 years general practice and icu specialty, how strict are vets to hire me without certification and can I simply take a test like you vs. A 2 yr. degree?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

CindyRVT in Henderson, Texas

55 months ago

Alli,
New York is a state that licenses veterinary technicians. You cannot use the title veterinary technician or perform certain tasks unless you are licensed. You cannot take the VTNE and be licensed as a veterinary technician in New York without having a degree in veterinary technology from an AVMA accredited veterinary technology degree program. You MUST title yourself as a veterinary assistant in New York if you don't want to run into trouble.

www.op.nysed.gov/prof/vetmed/vtlic.htm

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

CindyRVT in Henderson, Texas

55 months ago

CA Vet Tech in San Francisco, California said: .
Soon I will take the CA state board and have the RVT title (with out a traditional 2 year A.S. degree, but via the "alternate route- category 4"). I feel this will give me a sense of accomplishment.

This sort of thing only works in California. All other states which credential veterinary technicians use the Veterinary Technician National Exam and you MUST be a graduate of an AVMA accredited veterinary technology degree program to take the VTNE in most of them. And by the end of 2010 no state will be able to offer the VTNE to anyone to "grandfather in".

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

CindyRVT in Henderson, Texas

55 months ago

Veterinary technicians are required (in most states) to have a 2 year degree in veterinary technology from an AVMA accredited veterinary technology program, to have passed the Veterinary Technician National Exam and a state exam in order to be credentialed. They are also generally required to attend a set number of continuing education courses each year to keep up with changes in veterinary medicine. Veterinary technicians are educated in veterinary anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, animal husbandry, surgical assisting, anesthesia, medical nursing, diagnostics such as radiology and ultrasonography, clinical pathology, parasitology, medical terminology and record keeping, biological collection and sample handling and preperation, etc. They can also specialize in areas such as emergency and critical care, internal medicine, anesthesia, dentistry, behavior and equine nursing.

The American Veterinary Medical Association maintains a list of accredited degree programs on their website: www.avma.org/education/cvea/vette…

In some states, the use of the title "veterinary technician" and the practice of veterinary technology is recognized as profession and licensure is required. In other states, veterinary technicians are registered or certified. The laws that govern veterinary technicians vary from state to state so for specific information on the laws a person should check their state veterinary practice act or contact their state veterinary licensing board.

Before enrolling in a veterinary technology program, it is a good idea to volunteer or take a job at a veterinary hospital to see what the job of a veterinary technician really entails. Many people think that it will suit them but find out differently once they start school. Having personal experience in a veterinary facility will also help you to excel in your classes by giving you real-world application for what you are learning.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

hmbun9@aol.com

44 months ago

I have worked as a Vet tech for 9 years, I'm not licensed. It was never a problem where I worked, I was head tech. I did everything. Now I know longer work where I did and I got a Job with a low cost spay and neuter clinic just opening up. Well now I won't be able to do what I used to do because I'm not licensed. The cvt they hired thinks she's all that because she is licensed, I have a lot more experience then her. It is very hard going from doing everything and being head tech in an animal hospital to doing only what an unlicensed tech can do. They seem to think as an assistant they can't do nearly as much. Is there a list of what an unlicensed tech and cvt can do?`

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

CindyRVT in Henderson, Texas

44 months ago

The answer to that is going to depend on what state you live and work in, but yes in many states there are legal differentiations in what can and can't be done by a licensed individual as compared to an unlicensed assistant.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.