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Host

What are the top 3 traits or skills every veterinary technician must have to excel?

Can you suggest any tips or insights to develop your veterinary technician expertise?

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Barry in Bellwood, Pennsylvania

90 months ago

even if it's not in your "Job Description" Do it anyway.
e.g. when I started my new job, my first day I did laundry. the kennel staff was in shock that a tech did laundry.

don't worry about how busy it's going to be,it will somehow get done & don't keep looking at the clock,it's amazing how fast the time goes when you focus more on the task at hand.

Clean as you make a mess as much as poss. If you wait untill it slows down, that may be tomarrow.
This is my BIGGEST pet peeve.
I can't tell you how much Techs & Dr's are such SLOBS.before I leave for lunch the hospital looks respectfull. when I come back...it looked like hurricane katrina hit the hospital.It drives me insane.

No matter what your doing,or when talking with someone at the time your drawing meds out of a bottle.check then double check that is the correct drug and the correct amount of drug you need.

EVEN if your the slightest bit unsure about the correct drug or amount of drug,ask the Dr or experianced person to verify.Better safe than sorry.

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Aliy in Henderson, Nevada

86 months ago

1) Respect all other people, kennel, recept, doctors, and yes even other technicians you'll never know who your going to learn something new from even if they are newer to the feild then yourself.

2) Never start to think you know it all, or heck even half of it. They are always coming up with new things, new tecniques, and even new cool gadgets you can always improve.

3) Don't ever label your clients "PITA" or any other clever nickname. It is setting yourself up for negativity.

I agree with Barry as well. But these are my three pet peeve's

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Student in Louisville, Kentucky

83 months ago

I am a enrolled in a VEt Tech program that will prepare me for any type of animal situation. It is a 2 year Associates degree. Do you think this will help me acquire a better job when I am done with school?

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Tara Bockelmann in Clinton, Iowa

79 months ago

I agree with cleaning aspect there is always cleaning. I learned it is a very people oriented enviroment so being polite to everyone even when you want to slap them is something to learn. treating every animal with respect( exp. if owners around) even the ones that want to bite. alwys smile,stay calm, and be busy are 3 traits i have learned

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Janetta in Kernersville, North Carolina

79 months ago

Student in Louisville, Kentucky said: I am a enrolled in a VEt Tech program that will prepare me for any type of animal situation. It is a 2 year Associates degree. Do you think this will help me acquire a better job when I am done with school?

Going to Tech School may help you get a better job but you will never fully be prepared for any type of animal situaion. Every situation is different even if it's the same type of animal and same diagnosis it is never the same situation. It will give you training in how to improvise and take it as it comes.

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Susanne in Dadeville, Alabama

76 months ago

Host said: What are the top 3 traits or skills every veterinary technician must have to excel?

Can you suggest any tips or insights to develop your veterinary technician expertise?

Re: Britt Vet Services in Tallassee AL

Patience: You must be patient and willing to listen to pet owners. They are not just "pets" to some owners, it's their kid. You cannot learn it all in one day, pace yourself and if the office you're going to work at is organized, you'll be placed in different areas on the job to learn more effectively. Ignore the know-it-alls who've been there years and make you feel like you can't do it. They are hateful and full of insecurities.

Multi-tasking: Be ready to learn learn learn everything you can and be able to juggle 3 things at once. Listen and take notes if possible! Don't get mad if the Doctors make you feel incompetent. They know what they're doing. You're still learning.

Kindness: Don't let clients hear you whispering negatives about their pet. Find a code word for Parvo. It can start a panic when said out loud. Be kind to the animals...I worked in a Vet's office and I know the clients heard the assistants calling their pets "stupid animals" screaming at them to "shut-up" and that kind of behavior is uncalled for. If you cannot hack working in a Vet's office with noise, go somewhere else.
DO NOT put up with a co-worker who is unkind to the animals or anyone. They are in the wrong business. There is NO EXCUSE for being HATEFUL.

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Dorothy in San Antonio, Texas

59 months ago

Hi all! Need some help. I've been juggling the idea of enrolling at Palo Alto College (in S.A., TX) for the Associates degree in Veterinary Technology or waiting until next semester to enroll at San Antonio College's R.N. program. I would love to be either an R.N. or a veterinary technician, but not sure! I love both animals and people...but would much rather care for animals. Has anyone attended Palo Alto's vet tech program? Can I do this at night while I hold my full-time day job? They also want you to have completed at least 80 hours of working or volunteering in a veterinarian's office before enrolling. How would you go about that...especially if I work full-time weekdays?

I know there is a big difference in salary between a nurse and a vet tech. About how much does a vet tech with an Associate's degree make in San Antonio, TX? If I didn't have the debt I have now, I would definetly just go straight into the program, but from doing some online research, it looks like vet techs make about the same as what I make now as an admin. coordinator. Not sure if I should go to school for 2 years to end up making the same...I would definetly be A LOT happier as a vet tech but not sure if it's worth putting the time, and money into it.

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CindyRVT in Henderson, Texas

59 months ago

Dorothy,
For specific information about Palo Alto's program, contact one of the directors or instructors. They can give you better factual information---always go to the source ;)
As for what a veterinary technician makes in San Antonio, it will vary depending on your experience, skill, etc as well as the type of clinic you work in. Avg in Texas is somewhere around $32K a year but again that is an average and you may make more or less depending on the specifics of your situation.
I would highly recommend that you volunteer or take a job working as an assistant at a veterinary hospital before you enroll in the veterinary technology program. This will help you be sure you are making the right decision and working in a practice makes it easier to assimilate and retain the knowledge and skills you learn in school.

Cindy D., RVT
President-Elect
Texas Association of Registered Veterinary Technicians
cindyd@tarvt.org

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CindyRVT in Henderson, Texas

59 months ago

Top 3 skills:
1. Attention to detail.
2. Good communication skills.
3. Ability to multi-task.

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VetTech in San Antonio, Texas

50 months ago

I currently have a job as a vet tech in San Antonio and am trying to decide if it would be worth it to enroll in the Palo Alto vet tech program to get certified. I'm pretty much learning at work what I would be taught if I took the program, but what I'd really like to know is how much more I would get paid as a vet tech if I were certified. If there's any certified veterinary tech's reading this I'd really appreciate it if you could tell me about your salary so I can decide whether or not it would be worth my time to get certified.

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CindyRVT in Henderson, Texas

50 months ago

Trust me, there is a lot more that you will learn while earning your degree than you will learn on the job. I was OTJ trained for 3 years and when I went to school I was floored by how much I didn't know.

Another really good reason to go ahead and get your degree is the fact that the Texas Veterinary Medical Association, the Texas Assoc. of Registered Veterinary Technicians and the Texas State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners (the licensing board for veterinarians) are all looking towards licensure for veterinary technicians in this state. So you should really consider going ahead with getting your degree as it is very likely to be necessary to work as a "veterinary technician" in this state in the future. (I know all of this because I am the president of TARVT and it was a HUGE topic this last weekend at the TVMA annual conference. The executive director of the TBVME even asked me to call him to discuss it this week.)

Currently the difference in pay in Texas really depends on where you are, but you will earn at least a bit more as a registered veterinary technician in this state and possibly quite a bit more depending on where you work and your own work ethic and skill. In major metropolitan areas, $15 per hour isn't uncommon for registered veterinary technicians.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me directly at cindyd@tarvt.org

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