College degree needed to be a secretary

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

61 months ago

If your mom doesn't have time to surf the web to look for a job, then how is she supposed to havde the time to actally go to work if she gets a job?

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Administrative Professional in Atlanta, Georgia

61 months ago

Icant in Boston, Massachusetts said: My MOM is looking for a job and I Feel frustrated with her because she doesn't have time to surf the web for jobs! She has a family to raise. If you know of any good jobs for 41 year olds that are close or in Haverhill,please respond.

If she really wants a job, she will have to invest the time to look for one - there is no way around that. There is no one that can do this for her - not even you. It is her responsibility as an adult seeking work in the labor force, to find her own employment. Since most employers post open positions on the internet, she will have to get comfortable surfing various company and job board sites to find vacant positions. These positions will not come to her.
In addition, being able to perform multiple tasks is a skillset employers want and desire- if your mother feels as though she is unable or reluctant to take the time to find work because she is raising a family and can't find time in her day to surf on the web for jobs- then she may not be ready to enter the workforce. I understand your frustration, but she has to take the initiative. It is admirable that you care for your mother. I wish and you mother well.

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Eloise in Rensselaer, New York

60 months ago

Well every job I apply for that SAYS it requires a degree, which I HAVE, completely ignores my degree and demands work experience and references when they SEE me. It's as if, I have a degree "on paper" but once the company SEES me they either forget that sometimes I've sent in copies of my transcript attached to my resume or the application, or they assume I look like I'm lying about having that degree - which they promptly excuse themselves by insisting that I "look young." That I don't "look" old enough to be a college degreed displaced homemaker.

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Rita in Schaumburg, Illinois

59 months ago

Scarlett said: Why is a college degree needed to be a secretary/receptionist/typist? What ever happened to life experience and good old fashioned common sense? I know the answer is that there is an overabundance of college degrees out there and, therefore, employees can now ask for degrees for the most menial jobs imaginable. When I got out of secretarial school, I taught myself, and was taught by some wonderful people on the job, pretty much all that I needed to know. I never got the sheepskin for financial and familial reasons and it now seems that I cannot compete anymore with all the freshly minted people coming out of colleges with BAs and above. How many employers really think that anyone with a BA is going to be content to be a secretary, or administrative assistant. Did they really lay out hundreds of thousands of dollars to be a glorified secretary? Will someone please explain to me why a degree is necessary to properly answer a phone, take accurate messages and compose and type correspondence. No, I certainly don’t know everything, but I love to read, and learn, and give me a day or two and I will be up to speed. Learning how to learn is just as important, if not more so, than where it was learned.

There is one easy answer to this ... it's called discrimination against "older" workers. Companies are quite saavy nowdays, including in the development of methods to eliminate older and more "seasoned" workers. With the assistance of a dead economy and hoards of college graduates who are unable to find employment in their chosen fields at this juncture, companies (who only see the bottom line and/or potential value to shareholders) are free to hire younger, lower salaried, and lower cost insureds. The last thing most corporations care about is diversity in the workplace (unless you consider workers in other countries to be diversified). If you're young, be prepared to pay high taxes to help support boomers who are unable to find jobs.

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diane in Glen Ellyn, Illinois

58 months ago

Sam in Littleton, Colorado said: Another possibility is finding a school that will give college credit for work experience. University of Phoenix may be one such school.

Forgot that so-called "University." It's a corporation in disguise!

what exactly does this mean?!!!

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diane in Glen Ellyn, Illinois

58 months ago

College Graduate in Albuquerque, New Mexico said: OK! See, we educated people argue too much! :). This is why, education is key! Look around you - everyone with a nice car, job, clothes, etc. well they went to school. Sorry, but it is the America way of life! College degree equals job chances equals security equal YOU WILL BE RESPECTED by others. Respected because you are EDUCATED! People that do not have degrees, meant know more... However, you have to prove it! My degree says, I am the boss! Sorry, but True!

You sure are ignorant for someone with a degree!! Your degree says you graduated from whatever school you graduated from...You say your the boss...While I just recently got my degree I was never disrespected in my job or by anyone else for that matter. I drove/drive a nice car, have nice clothes and made respectable money all without a degree...if you have to define yourself by a piece a paper, that's pretty sad!! Words of wisdom...knowledge you get from college...smarts you get from LIFE!!...get a life!!!

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madaleneg in Irvington, New York

58 months ago

x2davis in Decatur, Georgia said: I agree with this! There is nothing about a college degree that is going to make me any stronger of a secretary than my existing 10+ years of experience. Yet, with all that experience, outstanding references, etc., I'm still finding myself being "weeded out" for administrative positions due to, what I assume, is the lack of a Bachelor degree. Although, like so many others, if I accomplished a Bachelor or Master's degree, I can't say a mere administrative role is something I would be interested in any longer.

With over 25 years in various office environments, and at the age of 58, I find myself unemployed and living in Westchester County, NY trying to get a new job is like finding a needle in a haystack. Additionally, like you said above why all the hoopla about a degree for being a secretary??? BECAUSE they are hiring those college grads who also cannot find a job at entry level salaries...They cannot afford to pay us $40-50 K anymore...I hope that explains what I found out over the past year...

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dee in Boston, Massachusetts

58 months ago

To the person that responded: "If you have to define yourself by a piece a paper, that's pretty sad!! Words of wisdom...knowledge you get from college...smarts you get from LIFE!!...get a life!!!".......VERY WELL PUT!

To College Graduate in Albuquerque, New Mexico: No, contrary to your belief, your "piece of paper" doesn't make you the boss. Words of advice...."Climb down off your high horse!"..... You're destined to fall flat on your face!! Heed to the advice of those apparently more wiser than you.....GET A LIFE!!!!!!!!

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alberta38@*****.*** in New York, New York

56 months ago

I felt trouble brewing back in 2007 and went back to school and received my Associates (which apparently isn't good enough along with my 15 + years, it has to be a BA or BS). I'm heading back to school in January but to be quite honest, I don't think it's going to get better for women my age or older for SPECIFICALLY this type of job UNLESS you are working and have been working for a very senior person and you've been with him for years (and remember he might be retiring soon, but I digress).

I've been VERY fortunate to pretty much work 49 out of 52 weeks a year on temp assignments since I was laid off in November of 2008 but let me tell you what I've seen at most of the 15 assignments I've worked at. I believe with the change in the economy it has made the employers very choosy i.e. younger. I truly believe it. I don't know about in other states but in NYC, about 95% of the executive and administrative jobs want a Bachelor's Degree and for most of us, i'll say maybe mid-to late 30's and up (I'm in my mid 40's) we went to work right out of high school AND so your experience means nothing now. If the company specializing in creating the sprinkles that go on an ice cream cone, then they are looking for '3-5 years experience in sprinkle mangement' with a 'BA' being 'required'. It's called BS aka filtering aka politics or i'm sure nobody's thought age discrimination. With basically very little experience but a BA or BS needed you leave out so many of us and of course pull the 20 something year olds that i see on assignment after assignment with short skirts and 3-inch (i'm not be dramatic) platform heels and fake eyelashes being brought in and us old fogey's (just joking) not being considered. I don't believe it's going to get better for us in this regards.

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Deborah James in Alameda, California

56 months ago

alberta38@comcast.net in New York, New York said: ... With basically very little experience but a BA or BS needed you leave out so many of us and of course pull the 20 something year olds that i see on assignment after assignment with short skirts and 3-inch (i'm not be dramatic) platform heels and fake eyelashes being brought in and us old fogey's (just joking) not being considered. I don't believe it's going to get better for us in this regards.

__________________________________________________________________

In the legal field, it's even worse. I have seen people with J.D.'s who are waiting for their bar results employed as secretaries or paralegals. They don't have a clue as far as operating the software or even the most basic knowledge of legal procedures. What's next, the medical field requiring medical secretaries to be med school graduates?

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alberta38@*****.*** in New York, New York

55 months ago

Goodness you sound just like me - things have definitely changed. I've worked for some of the top firms on Wall Street and have over 15 years experience but it means nothing because it's called 'filtering' I don't care what anybody wants to believe. Similar to what happened in Louisiana with Katrina (I know you think i'm going on a tangent but just read please). The idea is this: a man-made disaster (yes in both cases) causes the current folks to suffer and when it supposedly opens up again i.e. there are jobs out there like there are new places to live being built they're not with the people who lost the most in mind. I just noticed online a bachelors degree needed for a front desk receptionist! Seriously?! Pure and simple: AGE DISCRIMINATION - why is it that every other job posting reads: BA or 4-year degree required, along with either '2-4' or '3-5' years experience. Who exactly does that cover??!!! Who in there 30's, 40's and up, I mean on a large scale that has been an admin or exec ass't have a BA AND 3-5 years, come on, admit it. It is what it is - oh wait, I just noticed an posting for an admin ass't, again, that requires a BA and it's paying $14/hr in NYC!! really? I'm looking for a job starting this weekend working as a laborer (CSX or Amtrak) or park ranger. Sorry i needed to vent

Frustrated and angry in NJ

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alberta38@*****.*** in New York, New York

55 months ago

Rita in Schaumburg, Illinois said: TOTALLY AGREE 100%

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Penny in Davis, California

54 months ago

Deborah James in Alameda, California said: __________________________________________________________________

In the legal field, it's even worse. I have seen people with J.D.'s who are waiting for their bar results employed as secretaries or paralegals. They don't have a clue as far as operating the software or even the most basic knowledge of legal procedures. What's next, the medical field requiring medical secretaries to be med school graduates?

Actually, yes!

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Penny in Davis, California

54 months ago

dee in Indianapolis, Indiana said: Well; why don't you just tell me to go live under the bridge and wait to die. I am 50 years old and was always capable of getting employment until this..."MUST BE CERTIFIED" kick. I have been faithfully in the work force for over 35 years. Is it fair to just kick me to the curb after I have given my entire adulthood to working and now,knowing I am a baby boomer, I only have 17 years to retirement. How am I going to survive on what little social security I will get if I am unemployed for the next 17 years? And Yes...I am willing to work any place to self-sustain;but get this I have been told over and over that I have too much experience to make them believe that I will stay in that position. "Catch 22"....you think? I am taking MAA and Medical Billing and Coding online now.Do you know where I can get a job in my skill sector that is entry level while I'm going to school? Answer that!

Sorry but Medical Billing and coding won't help if you don't get two or more whole years' paid full time work experience doing that after you get the certificate and before you expect to get a job in it. And I know that makes no sense either, which is why I quit that certificate program. I have to find another use for a Bachelor of Science in Biology.....and I'm 40.

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madalene127 in Hastings On Hudson, New York

54 months ago

I am appalled that those of us with soooo many years of experience are being put out to pasture way too early, by the young kids running these companies have figured out a way to keep us from attaining employment. That being said to have to have a BA or BS is just that! BS!!! Since when did an admin or a skilled secretary ever need a degree???

This is a disgrace. In the end, my husband (a land surveyor) and 60+ years of age and I (59 next week), are selling our beautiful co-op in Westchester County, NY and forced to move out of state (probably Charlotte N.C.) where the only means to survive will be off of the same proceeds of our little co-op where we can rent down there or buy a sweet little townhome for half of what it costs here and still have quite a bit of money to hold us over until age 62 when he then I can collect SS.

It's never been our thoughts to have to move to a strange state knowing no one and with no family or friends there, but we will manage.

It is a disgrace that we are being displaced and uprooted from everyone and anything we have known all our lives. We hope to find even part time work there but if not...that is our Plan B.

Not everyone can do what we are doing, but it is a necessity, not a choice we have made for ourselves!

Good luck and happy holidays to all. Perhaps 2012 and a new government will get us back on our feet?

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Bluetea in Texas

54 months ago

madalene127 in Hastings On Hudson, New York said: I am appalled that those of us with soooo many years of experience are being put out to pasture way too early, by the young kids running these companies have figured out a way to keep us from attaining employment. That being said to have to have a BA or BS is just that! BS!!! Since when did an admin or a skilled secretary ever need a degree???

This is a disgrace. In the end, my husband (a land surveyor) and 60+ years of age and I (59 next week), are selling our beautiful co-op in Westchester County, NY and forced to move out of state (probably Charlotte N.C.) where the only means to survive will be off of the same proceeds of our little co-op where we can rent down there or buy a sweet little townhome for half of what it costs here and still have quite a bit of money to hold us over until age 62 when he then I can collect SS.

It's never been our thoughts to have to move to a strange state knowing no one and with no family or friends there, but we will manage.

It is a disgrace that we are being displaced and uprooted from everyone and anything we have known all our lives. We hope to find even part time work there but if not...that is our Plan B.

Not everyone can do what we are doing, but it is a necessity, not a choice we have made for ourselves!

Good luck and happy holidays to all. Perhaps 2012 and a new government will get us back on our feet?

How long are you going to wait on a "new government"? It's always the same as the last one.

The college degree is just a way to filter the hundreds of applicants that companyies are getting. You need an MBA to work in the mailroom now.

On top of that, you still have to be able to move because the jobs are not just down the street anymore. I have an MBA and I am in my 3rd state now.

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Laidoff2009CT in Norwalk, Connecticut

54 months ago

I think the Degree requirement is a joke. I was lucky, I didn't have a degree, but I landed a job in a global company, but they lay off daily so I am getting worried. I was laid off from another corp. giant after many years in 2009. For 18 mos, I did contract work. I think the degree thing is a filter, and it's also a creation of greedy placement agents who popularized the trend. It's sad because it's a new form of discrimination.

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Bluetea in Texas

54 months ago

Laidoff2009CT in Norwalk, Connecticut said: I think the Degree requirement is a joke. I was lucky, I didn't have a degree, but I landed a job in a global company, but they lay off daily so I am getting worried. I was laid off from another corp. giant after many years in 2009. For 18 mos, I did contract work. I think the degree thing is a filter, and it's also a creation of greedy placement agents who popularized the trend. It's sad because it's a new form of discrimination.

It is a filter now. You could just as well say, "Only people with red hair and green eyes need apply" and it would accomplish the same thing.

The problem is that the training budgets have been slashed and the money put into the pockets of the CEOs. Companies today, want you to have the education/experience and they want someone else to have paid for it.

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Zac in Adrian, Michigan

54 months ago

An AA degree is an Associates, my friend has just graduated with this 'secretary degree' and yes it teaches you computer skill, people management and typical 'answering the phone' skills.

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Penny in Davis, California

54 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said:
On top of that, you still have to be able to move because the jobs are not just down the street anymore. I have an MBA and I am in my 3rd state now.

California, Oregon, Washington, Nevada, New Mexico, Colorado, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Rhode Island (OK I know, what was I thinking?!) Massachusetts....

I'm back in California, I guess I came home to DIE. I'm not moving anymore looking for jobs, chasing rainbows, going on wild goose chases following leads and invitations that invariably change their minds when they SEE me when I get there. When they see that *that's* what a Choctaw Indian looks like.

I came back home to California because of Healthy San Francisco, and if I die on the operating table at least I won't have to worry about SURVIVING any more.

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Penny in Davis, California

54 months ago

x2davis in Decatur, Georgia said: I agree with this! There is nothing about a college degree that is going to make me any stronger of a secretary than my existing 10+ years of experience. Yet, with all that experience, outstanding references, etc., I'm still finding myself being "weeded out" for administrative positions due to, what I assume, is the lack of a Bachelor degree. Although, like so many others, if I accomplished a Bachelor or Master's degree, I can't say a mere administrative role is something I would be interested in any longer.

NO IT'S NOT. Those of us WITH Bachelor's degrees get weeded out for lack of the experience or references. It's a double-edged sword.

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Lady Greystoke in Oak Lawn, Illinois

54 months ago

The problem with many college graduates is, as others have mentioned, that they usually think they are too good to do 'secretarial' work (though, of course, the 's' word is hardly ever used today as we must cater to graduates' grandiose perceptions of themselves!) and are only marking time in the position until they can find something 'better.' I have seen it again and again where I work - all but a handful of graduates have come to the job with the intention of doing as little administrative work as they possibly can (because they don't want to be labeled as an administrator) and focusing on the other, more creative aspects of the job that are sometimes offered to them because they are college graduates. (Assuming, of course, they are looking to stay in the company since, as I said, many are just there until they can find something else.) My boss has been trying to push me into a supervisory role towards the three other administrators in our department (all youngish women in their mid to late 20s working on their masters) in order to improve their administrative skills but I am doing everything I can to avoid taking such a role - what a nightmare it would be to try and get such people to take their role as an administrator seriously! Just the thought makes me want to shoot myself! LOL

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Deborah James in Alameda, California

54 months ago

Lady Greystoke in Oak Lawn, Illinois said: The problem with many college graduates is, as others have mentioned, that they usually think they are too good to do 'secretarial' work (though, of course, the 's' word is hardly ever used today as we must cater to graduates' grandiose perceptions of themselves!) and are only marking time in the position until they can find something 'better.' I have seen it again and again where I work - all but a handful of graduates have come to the job with the intention of doing as little administrative work as they possibly can (because they don't want to be labeled as an administrator) and focusing on the other, more creative aspects of the job that are sometimes offered to them because they are college graduates. (Assuming, of course, they are looking to stay in the company since, as I said, many are just there until they can find something else.) My boss has been trying to push me into a supervisory role towards the three other administrators in our department (all youngish women in their mid to late 20s working on their masters) in order to improve their administrative skills but I am doing everything I can to avoid taking such a role - what a nightmare it would be to try and get such people to take their role as an administrator seriously! Just the thought makes me want to shoot myself! LOL

__________________________________________________________________

There is a difference between being an "administrative assistant" and an "administrator."

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CatLynn in Ashland, Kentucky

54 months ago

Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania said: I agree with you on that. We live in a youth-oriented culture today, and it's just not in the job market. It's in the entertainment field as well. They want to cater to the younger people. That's not right.

No, it is NOT right. It really raises my hackles when these snooty, younger twits want to just cast off mature workers as yesterdays garbage. And I look at employers of this mind set the same way. I was Office Manager for a small agency until 7 weeks ago. Due to the economy, the office closed down. I have been unable to find another clerical position since then. I have no degree, though I have 2 years of college classes - but I have the skills required - just not that piece of paper. I have many years clerical experience, type 60 wpm, skilled using all office machines, MS Word, phones, etc. I don't have anyone else's income to fall back on, and really need a job soon. To all of people in your 20's,30's, etc. your attitude towards someone my age and the work force is deplorable. Grow up...one of these days you will be in my age category - though you feel invincible now. I wouldn't want to wish age discrimination on you. I am 56 years old...a very vital, very alive and active person. And I really need that job.

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abc in Waukegan, Illinois

53 months ago

abc

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Judes in Waukegan, Illinois

53 months ago

You should not worry about competing with college degrees.Candidates join as assistants with the hope of gaining business experience and growing, being promoted to higher positions as a degree is a MUST HAVE. What really happens is you end up competing with assistants with no degrees but vast experience in the same field to bump your grade up to one level as an assistant and the answer is lack of experience. If you have experience you lack a degree and if you have a degree you lack experience. Once an assistant always an assistant - you go nowhere. If you need to compete; it's not on the basis of WHAT you know, IT IS WHO YOU KNOW! NETWORK is the answer.

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NYMA in Haverhill, Massachusetts

52 months ago

My contract job ended some time again and am still searching for an Executive Assistant job. I have 14 years of experience as an EA, but only possess an Associates degree. Even though my skill set is above the standard, and I have worked for some well know companies, I still seem to be passed over just because I don't have a Bachelor's degree. I just don't understand the reasoning of this on an employers part; it's extremely frustrating. I believe that they are passing over at least a hand full of excellent candidates because of this. Guess I have to look at it as the employers loss. That may make me FEEL better, but it certainly isn't paying the bills!

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Laid Off in ct but now employed in Norwalk, Connecticut

52 months ago

I totally can relate to your frustration. I see this happening a lot. While I was off and doing contract work, one company required a Masters!! I wrote a letter asking them why they required a MS degree for a job that shouldn't require a degree! Well, they sent back a very bad scan of a poorly written letter that was an absolute joke! I guess other's were speaking up about the rediculous requirement. Believe me in y 68 or more interviews in 18 mos. I came across some insane interviewing practices by companies. Over testing, over requirements, personality tests, take home projects, you name it! Well, I have to say, I landed 5 contracts in Major companies and they didn't require anything but my references, a drug test and my experience. I think the degree nonsense is a creation of these times, and the greedy agents and HR people who design these insane metnods!! I feel so lucky I found a job. But, know how hard it was.

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Kim in Boston, Massachusetts

47 months ago

Having a college degree does not make you smarter than anyone else, it's an elitist way to keep certain folk who are qualified from even applying. It's discrimination but modern discrimination! EVERYONE Can't afford to go to college, so does this mean they are not as smart and eager to work or to learn?? Whoever said they aren't is an idiot and whoever said someone with a degree is more qualified is also and idiot. You could have a degree in BASKET WEAVING, it don't mean jack if you never actually, physically weaved a damn basket. I have 3 years of college and I don't remember anything I learned and neither does anyone with a degree, that's why they go back to college for a post secondary college degrees and once they get an post secondary degree, they don't remember anything from that either. College is a joke, you never read an entire course book, for any course, you only read it to cram for test and once the test is over you purge the information to prepare for the next test. I am tired of low level blue collar jobs, asking for a degree. You don't need a freaking degree to answer phones, or to type a document. If I spent a heap of money and have loans up the WAZOO there is no way in hell I would want a low level-low entry blue collar job. But you all take those low level jobs because no one else will hire you, sadly due to your lack of job experience and you all will take these job, paying next to nothing, thus not forcing companies to pay more, because you are so desperate for work to pay off loans. It's called UNDEREMPLOYMENT you all hurt the economy and not help it. We need blue collar workers in blue collar jobs and we need elite white collar, degreed folks in white collared jobs, creating more jobs, not taking them away. People with degrees should be inventing and starting businesses since you all are so damn smart. This entire country is one big prejudice JOKE.

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Bluetea in Texas

47 months ago

Kim in Boston, Massachusetts said: Having a college degree does not make you smarter than anyone else, it's an elitist way to keep certain folk who are qualified from even applying. This entire country is one big prejudice JOKE.

The college degree thing is a hiring filter now. Just a way to handle the hoard of applicants.

In my family, its the ones who didn't go to college that are doing well. LOL!

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Sandy in Amarillo, Texas

47 months ago

Anne in Littleton, Colorado said: HOW WOULD THEY KNOW HOW OLD YOU ARE WHEN YOU'RE INTERVIEWING ANYWAY? AGE IS A POSITIVE THING - --MORE EXPERIENCE, MORE SKILL. We seem to live in a country that tosses the sharper more experienced workers out to pasture for the dumb ones whose G-strings show through their pants!

Anne, They know how old you are when you reply to the ad. They always want to know the year you graduated HS. That tells them your age range, and if you are older, a gold-plated resume will not get you an interview. I am experiencing this now.

I have a great resume showing many years of steady employment, super initiative, innovative in solving problems or designing processes to improve work flow, and on and on. I never even get an interview because of the HS graduation date. Oh, and I don't look my age either, but they don't know that, because I never get a foot in the door.

I am a great "girl Friday" because my heart's desire is to work behind the scenes to make sure my professionals present well and look good!

I have some fantastic instances of my ability to pull off something that everyone said couldn't be done; however, putting those in my resume would make it 5 pages long! We know what that would do.

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Bluetea in Texas

47 months ago

Sandy in Amarillo, Texas said: I have some fantastic instances of my ability to pull off something that everyone said couldn't be done; however, putting those in my resume would make it 5 pages long! We know what that would do.

ZZZZZZZZZZ! Be careful of old skills sets on a resume. That can date you too. I am a whiz on the keypunch machine but that ain't going on my resume.

If you are going to be dismissed because of age, let that happen at the interview when they can count your wrinkles - not at the resume stage.

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MeganExecutiveAssistant in Omaha, Nebraska

47 months ago

I just came across this website doing a search for "Katharine Gibbs School" and "Resume," as I am getting ready to look for a new job and not sure how to list my 1 year certificate program at Katharine Gibbs School in Norwalk, CT (which school no longer exists). It has been 8 years since I last hit the pavement looking for a job and if I remember, it was difficult at that time to find a position. My current position is Executive Assistant working for the General Counsel in the Legal Dept. of a company which will be closing down after 23 years (due to the economy). I have about 6 months until my end date.

I have noticed in my job searches that many of the job descriptions for Executive Assistants require a degree. This may be a problem since I only have a 1 year certificate from an Administrative Assistant program at Katharine Gibbs School and a Certificate from a Paralegal Program from the University of Connecticut. Combine that with the fact that I am in my early 40’s, so it may be difficult for me.

Ideally, it would be nice if my boss landed a position and would take me with him. He said he would if he could, but even he does not know where he is going at this point.

My last 2 positions (my current Executive Assistant position and the previous Paralegal position) were by word of mouth and I was recommended by the senior partners I worked for in the law firms over the years, so I never had to go through the whole recruiting agency process.

I have 25 years of law firm and in-house legal dept. experience. I had listed this on the very first line of my resume, but decided to take that out, as it may age me. I also only recently took out my high school graduation year (in the 80’s) again because people had told me this may work against me.

How do I get around the whole “degree required”? Another question, Katharine Gibbs School became Gibbs College sometime in the 1990’s. Do I still list the school as Katharine Gibbs School as it was in the 19

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MeganExecutiveAssistant in Omaha, Nebraska

47 months ago

(continued) in the 1980’s or do I list it as Gibbs College? Any guidance would be great! Thanks.

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MeganExecutiveAssistant in Omaha, Nebraska

47 months ago

LOL! @ Guest in San Francisco, Calif. :)

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Bluetea in Texas

47 months ago

guest in San Francisco, California said: Pretty soon we will see ads saying that a PhD is required to work at McDonalds.

My niece is a Medical Assistant which requires certification. She says there is more money teaching people to become MAs than in actually being an MA. This is big business.

Soon you'll need a certificate to run the French Fry machine.

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Bluetea in Texas

47 months ago

Scoutmander in Greenville, South Carolina said: I've applied and applied to that same hospital for that position description and lower ones under that and.........they say I don't have enough experience LOL.

Don't click the career link button. Click the "How you can help?" button. Donate $50,000 and suddenly you'll be just who they are looking for. LOL! My niece is an MA and she said this happened at the hospital where she works. Daddy made a donation and his daughter got the job. Funny how that works huh?

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Kim in Boston, Massachusetts

47 months ago

We need to go back to the old days, where you would apply in person, not online with filters.

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Allison in Astoria, New York

46 months ago

I certainly wouldn't want to be just an administrative assistant/secretary, if I had a Bachelor's Degree! What a waste of education and time to say the least. Lol

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NancyH in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

46 months ago

@Megan, too bad you're in Omaha; there's a firm here in Pittsburgh that's looking for someone like you! I actually know the guy who heads the firm; it's a huge personal injury firm, and he does those awful TV commercials, but he generates a LOT of business.

It blows my mind how many admin/exec admin jobs ask for a degree these days. Here I am, 50 years old and 33 years in, and I'm getting passed over for people who have a BA but can't spell. I wish I had the stones to ask these people, do you want someone who will expect a promotion in a couple years or leave you for a better job, or do you want someone who will stick with you? Turnover is expensive, folks, and someone like me is in it for the long haul.

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officespace in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

43 months ago

Honestly? Because companies have wrongly decided that HR departments should screen applicants according to the "HR criteria" - regardless of the needs of that position. Just another screening measure to keep VALUABLE resources OUT of the workforce (and they're hurting themselves). Must have: BS degree, 12 years experience??, experience with all aspects of MS Office and insert here: (random specialized training)...whatever...An exception: if you KNOW someone in this city, you're IN. At the last place I worked, I was an anomaly. I was hired through sourcing rather than all of the rest I interacted with - who either knew someone despite requirements or was a relative of someone. HR has been given way TOO MUCH POWER in the business field...given the power of rejecting "old", "fat", etc. or those persons that they feel they "DON'T LIKE". If we're going to build a better nation full of useful workers, we'll have to give people a fighting chance. There was an article in Yahoo the other day about 12 things or so that HR people don't tell you and they were ALL discriminatory and NOT in the best interest of any hiring company.

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officespace in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

43 months ago

@ Kim, I agree wholeheartedly...it's a complete shame it's become the "GAME" that it is now. I would "Like" your post 100x over. This economy and its business model is complete BS.

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Bluetea in Texas

43 months ago

officespace in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania said: Honestly? Because companies have wrongly decided that HR departments should screen applicants according to the "HR criteria" - regardless of the needs of that position. Just another screening measure to keep VALUABLE resources OUT of the workforce (and they're hurting themselves). Must have: BS degree, 12 years experience??, experience with all aspects of MS Office and insert here: (random specialized training)...whatever...An exception: if you KNOW someone in this city, you're IN. At the last place I worked, I was an anomaly. I was hired through sourcing rather than all of the rest I interacted with - who either knew someone despite requirements or was a relative of someone. HR has been given way TOO MUCH POWER in the business field...given the power of rejecting "old", "fat", etc. or those persons that they feel they "DON'T LIKE". If we're going to build a better nation full of useful workers, we'll have to give people a fighting chance. There was an article in Yahoo the other day about 12 things or so that HR people don't tell you and they were ALL discriminatory and NOT in the best interest of any hiring company.

I went to a networking meeting and an HR person was assaulted with this type of thinking. It wasn't her first rodeo. What she said made sense:

1. All of this was going on even back when you HAD THAT GOOD JOB and this is a tired complaint.
2. HR is often the target but the wrong one. HR didn't outsource the jobs or agree to pay CEOs, zillions of dollars a year.
3. HR doesn't make the rules. Many of them don't even get to decide when they can go to lunch.
4. Move up the food chain. Its the CEOs who make these decisions. HR gets a 30 minute lunch just like everybody else.

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officespace in Pennsylvania

43 months ago

@Bluetea - Good points. In all fairness, I suppose HR does get a bit more misdirected anger than they deserve in a lot of cases. I understand that the budget cuts affecting workers and giving CEO's huge salaries do result in HR applying more and more filters so they're not inundated with a billion resumes to go through.
The HR person that they interviewed on Yahoo (20 Things HR Won't Tell You - or something like that) listed so many things that had almost nothing to do with procuring valuable, experienced, talented employees, but was super snarky and sounded just plain mean. I would hope there are more good HR folks than bad, but most of those I've had the "pleasure" to deal with have been terrors - present one included. Even our senior managers quake in their shoes when she shows up. They put in 60 hour weeks and yet are super furtive when sneaking out a little early or coming in a little late - she lays in wait like a cobra. I guess HR's level of power varies from company to company as well. Ours come and go as they please. There's no one watching the "watchers" in our facility.

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

43 months ago

To Officespace:

This Bluetea Guy might have a point. Might, I said!

But the problem with HR is that they bring this negativity on themselves with what you were talking about.

What are a few responsibilities that HR has?

Employee Relations, Responsible for Employee Morale in an Organization, The Face of the Organization to the Outside Community.

With that being said then why is it that every interaction I have with HR as a potential job candidate are they sooooo for lack of a better phrase "JERSEY SHORE-ISH".

They are ALL so snippy, borderline rude, impatient, standoffish, sour-pusses, gate-keeper types, etc etc etc.

If you ask me allot of these HR people just need to get laid more.

Blue might be right, but I say that HR definitely brings this negative perception on themselves with how they conduct themselves.

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Bluetea in Texas

43 months ago

officespace in Pennsylvania said: @Bluetea - Good points. In all fairness, I suppose HR does get a bit more misdirected anger than they deserve in a lot of cases. I understand that the budget cuts affecting workers and giving CEO's huge salaries do result in HR applying more and more filters so they're not inundated with a billion resumes to go through.
The HR person that they interviewed on Yahoo (20 Things HR Won't Tell You - or something like that) listed so many things that had almost nothing to do with procuring valuable, experienced, talented employees, but was super snarky and sounded just plain mean. I would hope there are more good HR folks than bad, but most of those I've had the "pleasure" to deal with have been terrors - present one included. Even our senior managers quake in their shoes when she shows up. They put in 60 hour weeks and yet are super furtive when sneaking out a little early or coming in a little late - she lays in wait like a cobra. I guess HR's level of power varies from company to company as well. Ours come and go as they please. There's no one watching the "watchers" in our facility.

I am with you and have experienced the same thing. I just think that HR gets the bad rap because that is usually the only interaction we have with an employer. However, I really put the blame on these CEOs who actually make these decisions and are paid huge bonuses to keep costs down. HR just carries out the orders.

Google "How Employers Make It Hard to Find Good Workers". Its an MSN article and I agree 100% with that as well.

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Nancy in Homestead, Pennsylvania

39 months ago

I just found this article, and boy is it interesting for this group! Suzanne Lucas is my hero!

www.inc.com/suzanne-lucas/college-degree-required-but-why.html

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katiewla in Los Angeles, California

38 months ago

IT IS TIME TO START BEING YOUR OWN BOSS AND GET INTO A GOOD NETWORK MARKETING COMPANY. IT IS THE WAY OF THE 21ST CENTURY. WARREN BUFFET HAS SOME COMPANIES (PAMPERED CHEF BEING ONE); BILL GATES ENDORSES IT; ROBERT KIOSAKI, AUTHOR OF "RICH DAD, POOR DAD" JUST WROTE A BOOK ABOUT IT; AND MANY OTHERS. IT IS NO LONGER LIKE SELLING TUPPERWARE. THE STIGMA OF BEING A "PYRAMID SCHEME" IS ALMOST GONE. WE ARE AN INTERNET WORLD; BUY YOUR PRODUCTS ON LINE. BECOMING A NETWORK MARKETING CONSULTANT MEANS YOU DECIDE HOW, WHEN AND WHERE YOU WANT TO WORK. YOU CAN DO IT FROM HOME IN YOUR PJ'S. YOU CAN DO IT PART TIME TO EARN MONEY FOR RETIREMENT, VACATIONS, PAY OFF CREDIT CARDS, ETC. THEN ONCE YOU START MAKING THE BIG BUCKS, YOU CAN QUIT YOUR CRAPPY JOB AND MAKE WHAT COULD BE A LOT OF MONEY DEPENDING ON HOW MUCH TIME YOU PUT INTO IT. IT'S HARD WORK TO GET STARTED, BUT I KNOW MANY PEOPLE MAKING $20,000 A MONTH. SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT. JUST MAKE SURE YOU GET INTO A GOOD, STABLE COMPANY -- DO YOUR RESEARCH!

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despondent in nj in New York, New York

38 months ago

Oh yes it is AGE DISCRIMINATION at it's finest. I've BEEN sayin' that and so many people are like 'oh i never thought of that' - that's EXACTLY what it is. Most of the ads you see are for 'a four year degree and either 3-5 yrs or 1-2 yrs experience'

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monique in Livingston, Alabama

36 months ago

@katiewla..PLEASE TELL ME MORE ABOUT BEING MY OWN BOSS VIA NETWORKING MARKETING SKILLS

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