becoming a landlord/manager of apartment complex

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amberu in Puyallup, Washington

59 months ago

So... does anyone know what kind of licensing or certification is absolutely necessary to be an apartment manager, either full time or part time?

I've found a few sites, but they are just confusing me. One says that you need to complete building management licensing... another just says that you need to be a real estate agent. And a third says that you need to do both and have 2 years of Real Estate Sales.

All I want is to have get this job, so I can have a cheaper place to live while going to school.

Can anyone help clarify this for me... or send me to a site that can give me accurate answers?

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Laureen Olson in Los Angeles, California

59 months ago

Contact AAGLA or the "Apartment Association of Greater Los Angeles" and they will give you everything you need and more.
Laureen

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Janet in Walnut Creek, California

59 months ago

Your best bet is to find out the individual requirements of the job you are looking at. Different levels of property management require different certificates or licenses. Sounds like you are coming in entry level, I highly doubt you will need any license. Usually if the position is on a job board such as monster or craigslist, it will state the job requirements, experience level needed, special license, degree required, etc.

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Jake in Kansas City, Missouri

59 months ago

A friend of mine is looking at buying a 320 unit complex in Kansas City, KS, and wants me to be run the property management company. I have a degree in Automotive Engineering, but have a mixed work background, the most recent being a Police Officer in the ghetto of KCMO. I will be attending school 2-3 nights a week as well, to get another degree in Property Management. The idea is that he wants to buy 2-3 complexes a year while the buying is good due to the previous investors making poor choices and trying to get quick cash on flips, and hitting a huge wall with the economy and property value. His dad was a hotelier and started a luxury hotel chain that was bought by the Hiltons a few years back, so we have a great leader to help us and coach us. I've also managed sales employees before, so I do have that experience. I choose not to disclose my intended salary, but I was curious as to how many sales employees and maintenance people should I have for a complex that large? I was thinking 1 full time sales person and one part time maintenance person. I'm a bit of a handy man, and so is my dad who works from home when he wants to. A good friend also works for a renovation team, and has for the past 10 years, and can also help out when needed. So, with those resources, do you think that 1 sales person, 1 part time maintenance person, and myself overseeing the complex would be enough? I would outsource lawncare of course. Any suggestions?

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T in Modesto, California

59 months ago

I manage 50 units. There are usually several maintenance issues per week. You will need a full time maintenance person and an assistant. Once your tenants know there's maintenance available everyone with a drippy faucet will come out of the wood work. Apartment renters think you work for them not for the owner of the buildings....keep that in mind. 320 units is a lot of people/property to manage. You will need a fulltime mgr for the property and an assistant mgr for when the mgr is off. It's crazy business, good luck. If you buy up any properties in northern cal let me know. We've been on our property for 3 years now but have the itch for greener pastures. We manage low income/govt assisted property right now, it's a paperwork nightmare, I'd love to go conventional in the right area such as the beach or mountains ;)

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Let's just say ouch in Los Angeles, California

59 months ago

It depends on several things. How old is the bulding complex of 320 units, how well maintained has it been kept in the past, are you inheriting problems that are going to hit you side ways ?? Has there been a detailed inspection to indicate what you are walking into. Have you done a survey of the building existing tenants to see what the temperature is when them, happy sad or mad with current past management and maintenance "conduct" very important !!
You will be surprised how it will come to haunt you, even if you are a saint.
If the property is in need of significant "anything" have that included in the sales price and financing to accomidate and prepare for the costs. FYI do not let anyone of your tenants know that you were a police officer !!! It instantly puts you in a category "enemy" not manager/management and will create an un-necessary fear and resentment that you are better off without. Listen to me or not, but you will find out for yourself if you do not.
I have managed 200 + units through out my property management career and I have never been able to have a part time maintenance crew. Anything less than two individuals for 320 units is asking for problems....the list is too long to include here. If you are trying to keep labor costs down it will end up costing you double and triple more for it on the other end. Simply said when it comes to property management and maintenance do it right or don't do it at all. A little harsh but trust me I know what I am talking about !
The classes that you are taking are invaluable, soak up every once of this information, it will save your behind in many many ways, don't ever think that you can ignore or re-invent what you are being taught just follow the instructions and it will come out beautifully. Make as many contacts as you can while in class and take names and phone numbers, and stay in touch with them, they are your colleges, and sounding boards they are priceless.
Stay intouch www.laureensrealestate.com

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Shelia Hollis in Little Rock, Arkansas

58 months ago

Sudie said: Apartment manager jobs have pretty fast turnover. Most managers cant hang for more than a year because the tenants drive them crazy. My company alone, in the small area where I live, has already gone through 4 sets of mgrs in 2 years at some of our complexes. The jobs are out there, trust me.
Just remember that you give up your privacy. Unfortunately most complexes dont have a separate managers unit, so you have to share walls with tenants.... sometimes listening to the noise after being in your office all day can make you nutty.
I think managers would last longer if their dwelling was detached from the tenants....
If anyone can hear me, and you are building an apartment complex, do a great service and let the manager unit stand alone.

I manage a complex where the managers unit sits semi alone, just across from the laundry room. In my experience, being a stand alone unit may help some but it does drive you crazy because the still call and bang on your door with complaints and tale tales. However; being a new complex there are alot of things i'm still learning, and my biggest question is how many staff members are usually on board and what areas do they cover? I'm open to all suggestions and comments. Another question is what do you do when you have tale tales that tennants are dealing? Other than the contract, where do we cover ourselves?

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loving being an apartment manager in Lafayette, Louisiana

52 months ago

I'm manager a 100 unit complex and I love it. I have a assistant manager and three maintenance men. We are a great team and it makes me love my job because we all have an understanding. I live rent and bill free and I make 12.00 and hour and I just made a year on the job with no experience. But I must admit I'm a nubie on the job but I've worked my ass off. I learn whenever the opportunity approaches me. If you are willing to learn the job is only what u make it.

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Nenna in Hayward, California

52 months ago

I have worked in property management for more than 7 years and I feel like I need to change jobs at this point. Over the years I have progressively been advancing in position and pay. Finally, I was hired by an established management company which offered great benefits, and this is when I decided to throw in the towel. The law requires the presence of an on-site community manager, but this does not mean that living where you work is practical. It can be challenging to live so close to your clientele. You return to your place of residence and on your time off you have to face the people with which you do business. Another thing which I realize is wrong about living on-site is that when you first begin a job you are in a probationary period. This probationary period allows both the employee and employer to determine if the job is suited for the employee. It doesn't make sense that an employee is obligated to move to the worksite upon commencing employment without knowing if the job is suitable or not. It is too big of a commitment. Maybe all jobs are like this but I have never seen people passing the buck as well as it is done in property management. The staff that work at the office/property get the worst of it especially when the market is slow and vacancies or turnovers are high. Most positions in property management are now requiring a bachelor's degree but property management, in my opinion, is not evolved enought to set such high standards. Some college is necessary, but, in my experience, I have dealt with so many unprofessional and abusive people in upper management that I can't imagine why anyone educated would endure such working conditions. Those that do endure might not have too many choices or are lured by having an apartment without having to deal with any legal agreements or direct payment of rent or bills. I stayed for important reasons but I'm done now.

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Jennifer in Marysville, Washington

52 months ago

I completely agree!

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Janet in Concord, California

52 months ago

Hi Nenna, I see you're over there in Hayward, I'm in Concord. Yeah I hear you it can get nasty with the internal personnnel. And you are absolutely correct in that upper management doesn't seem to actually have management skills or management training. And I can't see the onsite resident manager positions requiring a degree unless it's a mix of property mgmt and onsite or it's a huge 250+ unit community. I have to wonder about the residents if it's that bad to see them when you're not in the office! I'm pretty new to this but I set boundaries from the very beginning: don't come to my residence for property business, office hours 9 - 5 unless it is an emergency. Sheesh when I first took over people would come knocking at my the door to my home at 8:45 PM!!!! Well good luck with wherever you are going. It's a tough economy right now to just leave a job.

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Charlie Wade in Bay Area, California

52 months ago

I'd like to add a couple of thoughts:

A LOT of jobs do not require what a college degree offers. But a degree is often required as just a way to cull down the number of applicants, that's all. Plus, although it's not a sure thing, you're more likely to know how to write professionally if you have a degree, which is important in all corporate environments.

Secondly, living among people you manage can be stressful. But that depends on you and the tenants. I have had no issues living among the tenants I manage. But I also set boundaries about things. Unless it is an actual, real, genuine emergency, they know not to bother me during off-hours/weekends; that they need to send an email for such things and we'll get to them during the business days as soon as we can work it into our queue. And even if I do have time off-hours/on weekends to fix such non-emergency tasks, I don't do that. I don't want tenants getting into the frame of mind that I will deal with such things during off-hours at all.

As far as the probationary thing.... well, that's just part-and-parcel of any job. Besides, if you live in an at-will employment state (as almost all of them are), you are ALWAYS on probation, since you can still be fired for almost any reason (or non at all). Yes, you are taking a chance on having to move again in just a few months. But that's just the way it goes...

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Nenna in Hayward, California

52 months ago

I can assure that I well understand the benefits of a college degree since I have most of my college education. Considering my experience, which is extensive, I have no problem setting boundaries but it's a personal choice to not want my clients to have so many clues as to what I do when I have time off, and I assure that I live a sane and stable life so I'm not trying to hide anything. I enjoy absolute privacy. I know very well that all jobs have a probation period, but why ask someone to go through the hassle of moving on-site when no one knows if the job is a fit or not? For some, moving might not be an inconvenience, but for others it is costly, time-consuming and stressful. I have worked for several different management companies and not much changes from one company to the next. The rental market is emotionally, socially and financially charged because it provides shelter for people and it's the highest bill for the majority of us. There is much controversy and turmoil inherent in any organization that is involved with something so primal. After food, our nature demands shelter. I've done this long enough to know. Rarely do you find an apartment manager that stays for too long, rarely. I have seen it firsthand and I have shared these views with others in the same industry.

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T in Modesto, California

52 months ago

I'm kind of weary of tenants these days.... where do you go AFTER being an apartment manager for a few years?

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Janet in Concord, California

52 months ago

Interesting, Charlie. I used to manage a staffing branch, and never saw an employer require a degree just to cull through applicants, and I haven't seen many on site manager jobs that are considered corporate.

Nenna, I hope I didn't offend you by stating the way I handle the privacy issue, I understand you are experienced and just tired of the whole game. Having just got off the phone with the family member of a resident who is in arrears and reneged on the opportunity that was given them to come current - I'm the bad guy because I had to tell her that not only didn't she uphold her end of the agremeent she didn't even have the courtesy to advise me that she wasn't going to, let me say Nenna: I hear ya loud and clear!

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Charlie Wade in Bay Area, California

52 months ago

Interesting, Janet. I have worked MANY jobs that don't need a degree to do but the employer requires one just because they can. And it helps to cull down the number of replies to ads.

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Janet in Concord, California

52 months ago

OK Charlie you win. Have a great night.

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T in Modesto, California

52 months ago

Try managing "low income housing" if you want a challenge and a half.

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Nenna in Hayward, California

52 months ago

I hear you T. I did that for most of last year. Never again.

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Charlie Wade in Bay Area, California

52 months ago

Nenna in Hayward, California said: Rarely do you find an apartment manager that stays for too long, rarely.

That is simply not true. You much more often find someone who has been at the same complex for years and years than you do someone who hasn't. People stay as an apt manager at the same place for years because (1) who wants to move and (2) why take a chance on something else when you already have free rent? Two in the bush is not as good as a bird in hand.

In fact, because it is such an upheaval to bring in a new on-site manager, I think you actually see a lot more bad managers stick than be fired. LLs don't want to go through the hassle.

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Nenna in Hayward, California

52 months ago

Charlie, I don't know what area you live in, but I've met manager's that have been in the business for decades and none of them stayed in the same apartment complex for long. I've only met one manager that stayed at the same apartment complex for 16 years, but I haven't met anyone else. Please back up your statement with valid statistics because I'm very interested in knowing where you have seen this phenomenon.

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Janet in Concord, California

52 months ago

I figured that's what was going on with you Nenna. I lived in that type of community.

Oh, the place I lived in had 10 managers in 10 years. lol Kinda supports your stats Nenna.

But hey what do I know? Three decades in management; before I came here my job was to hire people, prior to that I was always the hiring manager; my job was to assess the job, determine the skill set required and hire the best candidate. That's a little different from having held "many" jobs.

Nenna in Hayward, California said: I hear you T. I did that for most of last year. Never again.

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Nenna in Hayward, California

52 months ago

Charlie, I'm not making comments on here claiming to be the authority on anything I say so I don't need to back anything up. I'm just giving my opinion, that is all. I'm not using terms like "that's definitely not true". If you use the word "definitely" you better back it up. That's just my opinion. You obviously love property management so glorify it all you have to but don't bash rational opinions. Nevertheless, I'll wait for you to extract another one of my sentences and use it to antagonize me. A job should make one happy.

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Janet in Concord, California

52 months ago

Nenna? Oh my gosh I think that was misunderstood. Nenna, that last comment was from me - I lived in an affordable housing community and they are hell on the managers as well as themselves. Based on your comments I figured that was where you were at - and kudos to you for lasting as long as you did.

But I can see that Charlie has made this forum feel aggressive and it doesn't need to be that way.

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Nenna in Hayward, California

52 months ago

Janet, I see what's going on now. Yeah, I hear you about affordable housing. They say it's for the benefit of low-income families and individuals, but all of that gets confused because real estate investors are lured by the tax credits. It's hard to keep an eye on the most beneficial purpose for such type of housing. My regional manager would visit the properties wearing flashy designer outfits all the time. It might seem like a petty complaint, but didn't she realize she was presenting herself in front of people that were far from affording such luxuries? Of course, there's a lot more to it than that. It was my first time working in affordable housing and it was my worst experience ever.

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Janet in Concord, California

52 months ago

Yes, you are right - my first thought is what is that person trying to prove? To make sure everyone knows that she doesn't live there??

What would always get me was I would see the photos of the absolutely gorgeous, brand new facilities for affordable housing. The one I lived in was in the most notorious area of the city, yet the developer was lauded for having taken the steps they did to provide the housing. But in reality what they did was buy the place, paint it and then then pat themselves on the back.

What was worse, the property became the dumping area for the city - those who were coming out of drug rehab programs. Every one of those placements was evicted. We saw someone's car burned by a mad ex-boyfriend. Have you ever seen a car burn up? It is a terrifying site, along with the knowledge that this person was wandering around the neighborhood... Also, the place was a drop off site for stolen cars. And the neighbors? Well, they were the ones inviting in the thieves with the stolen cars and selling drugs to those who just got out of the programs. So, again, I hear you loud and clear Nenna!

If I hadn't got out of there I swear I was heading for a breakdown. The people and the management were absolutely the most disgusting individuals I have ever been around.

Nenna in Hayward, California said: Janet, I see what's going on now. Yeah, I hear you about affordable housing. They say it's for the benefit of low-income families and individuals, but all of that gets confused because real estate investors are lured by the tax credits. It's hard to keep an eye on the most beneficial purpose for such type of housing. My regional manager would visit the properties wearing flashy designer outfits all the time. It might seem like a petty complaint, but didn't she realize she was presenting herself in front of people that were far from affording such luxuries?

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T in Modesto, California

52 months ago

Janet in Concord, California said: Yes, you are right - my first thought is what is that person trying to prove? To make sure everyone knows that she doesn't live there??

What would always get me was I would see the photos of the absolutely gorgeous, brand new facilities for affordable housing. The one I lived in was in the most notorious area of the city, yet the developer was lauded for having taken the steps they did to provide the housing. But in reality what they did was buy the place, paint it and then then pat themselves on the back.

What was worse, the property became the dumping area for the city - those who were coming out of drug rehab programs. Every one of those placements was evicted. We saw someone's car burned by a mad ex-boyfriend. Have you ever seen a car burn up? It is a terrifying site, along with the knowledge that this person was wandering around the neighborhood... Also, the place was a drop off site for stolen cars. And the neighbors? Well, they were the ones inviting in the thieves with the stolen cars and selling drugs to those who just got out of the programs. So, again, I hear you loud and clear Nenna!

If I hadn't got out of there I swear I was heading for a breakdown. The people and the management were absolutely the most disgusting individuals I have ever been around.

It is a horrifying environment. I've tried so hard here, but the abuse of the system by all the drug addicts is too hard to handle. And it's too hard to get rid of the bad people without absolute proof of the drug trafficking... and dangerous to try and police them.
They always pay their rent on time because they know if they do they are pretty immune to getting evicted.
I feel sorry for all of my elderly tenants that have to live here amongst the gangsters.
I would like to find a quiet complex to manage that wasn't subsidized.
My husband is pretty traumatized by a recently abandoned unit that is completely destroyed inside. Its gettin old

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Janet in Concord, California

52 months ago

wow. Have you tried companies like Cal-Am, Equity Residential or any of the other places that are usually hiring?

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T in Modesto, California

52 months ago

Janet in Concord, California said: wow. Have you tried companies like Cal-Am, Equity Residential or any of the other places that are usually hiring?

Actually no. We just now reached that last bit before the end of the rope, but thanks for the tip, I will do some research.

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Charlie Wade in Bay Area, California

51 months ago

Nenna in Hayward, California said: You obviously love property management so glorify it all you have to but don't bash rational opinions.

Thanks. I'm still waiting for you to make anything in the area code of a rational opinion. Please enlighten us all.

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david martinez in Ensenada, Mexico

46 months ago

Surfer in Orange, California said: I have seen 3 couples of apt mgrs in 4 years, wiunits)

My experience was: I got the certification as Apt Mgr, but because no experience I received from the other owner of 26 units, just free rent for management + maintenance...

In time owner changed, and have to pay the rent for apt, get 700 for mgmt and 12-15/hr for maintenance work..

What's your experience ?

Supervisor responded to all repairs

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Kdee in Stockton, California

46 months ago

Is there a general rule of how many staff is required vs. Number of units in the property? I think I've heard that 1 per 100 units?

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david martinez in Ensenada, Mexico

46 months ago

TO HUMAN RESOURCES IAM SEEKING EMPOLMENT
FOR APARTMENT MANAGER IN ANY STATE OF MEXICO
DO YOU DEAL WITH THIS KIND OF JOB POSITION

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MD in Long Beach, California

45 months ago

I have managed 3 different buildings of different sizes for 2 different management companies over the past 5 yrs. I've calculated my average compensation to be roughly about $30/unit. So in your case I would expect to receive $850 in rent credit. It's not alot but for me it worked out because the properties I managed was somewhat low maintenance and I was able to have a full time job in outside sales making $50k annually. My current building is about 60 units and I recevie free rent of a 2br and free utilities. I'm currently looking to manage a larger building of 200+ units to be full-time property manager with a decent salary. My advice to you would be to stick it out for a few more months to get used to the routine and start looking for a better gig with fair pay.

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HUDMANAGER in Carmichael, California

44 months ago

www.hud-manager.com

This is something I am interested in because it is true that you do need more than one person per 100 units; unfortuantely there is no law. In order to make it law i advice you to take the survey on this link above!

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JJ in Plano, Texas

42 months ago

Andy in Denver, Colorado said: I get free rent in a nice 2 bedroom apartment. All utilities paid. 1 free parking spot. 1/2 of my cable paid. $30 in laundry money. $200 bonus per rented apartment and a $500

OMG, I guess we are paid very well in Texas. I have managed 16 properties between 127 units and 707 units. The lowest amount I ever made was $38,000 and the highest $55,000 (per year) In addition I receive 60% off my rent and about $8,000 per year in bonuses. A normal staff is 2 people per 100 units (one office, one maintenance) i've managed between 3 and 14 full time employees. Guess I have to say I am blessed

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Selena Please in Orlando, Florida

42 months ago

dwight c in Los Angeles, California said: Iwould ;ike to know is there anybody out there in california that manages a 28 unit apartment and dont get paid but. the rent is $ 1,295.00 but you have to pay $ 695.00 for rent. and work at the same time? I`ve been in this apartment for 4 months and there is no compensation insight. what do I do??

Quit!

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KLW in Mount Vernon, Washington

35 months ago

I've been an apartment manager for about a month and I'm already feeling the burn out. The pay for me is better than average I believe. I get about 2000 per month plus free rent and I don't pay utilities. the previous manager was here for 5 years and doing it by herself. I'm lucky to have my husband helping me where he can.

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T in Modesto, California

35 months ago

Don't live your tenant's lives. that is the best advice i can give you. collect their rent, make them follow the rules, and dont let all the crap they tell you sway you. Do NOT become friends with any of your tenants. You can be friendly but dont hang out with them. DONT LIVE THIER LIVES.

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CUNFUCIUS I AM in BELMONT, California

35 months ago

T in Modesto, California said: Don't live your tenant's lives. that is the best advice i can give you. collect their rent, make them follow the rules, and dont let all the crap they tell you sway you. Do NOT become friends with any of your tenants. You can be friendly but dont hang out with them. DONT LIVE THIER LIVES.

Thanks T, that's the best advice ever, for any manager. I hope every one is paying attention. Be professional at all times. If you want to succeed in this enviorment you have to keep it away from your personal life. If you cant figure out how to do that, you should not be an apartment manager.

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Shelia in Little Rock, Arkansas

35 months ago

T, that is excellent advice! And so very, very true! We are actually butterflies, but we live our lives as worms because we want to be socialy accepted! Fly above and be the butterfly! Thanks T for sharing this with us.

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Shelia in Little Rock, Arkansas

35 months ago

Wow, that's amazing. I get 200 per week, and I pay half my rent/utilites. Is it just an Arkansas thing? lol

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JR in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin

34 months ago

I took a job as an on site apartment manager about five months ago. I pretty much like the job and find this site very helpful. I have many questions but will start with this one. This is a 24 hour a day job and I would like to know what is fair compensation. There are 88 units. I run the whole show and have a few people helping out. I get a free one bedroom apartment ( they would give me a two bedroom if I wanted it). I chose to have the office equipment moved into my unit for convenience. They pay my internet and phone line for the fax and they pay a portion of my cell phone bill. I also get $200.00 a month for everything I do except maintenance. I get $9.00 an hour when I do maintenance. I feel this is not fair compensation and would like to know if its good,common or unfair compensation.

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T in Modesto, California

34 months ago

JR in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin said: I took a job as an on site apartment manager about five months ago. I pretty much like the job and find this site very helpful. I have many questions but will start with this one. This is a 24 hour a day job and I would like to know what is fair compensation. There are 88 units. I run the whole show and have a few people helping out. I get a free one bedroom apartment ( they would give me a two bedroom if I wanted it). I chose to have the office equipment moved into my unit for convenience. They pay my internet and phone line for the fax and they pay a portion of my cell phone bill. I also get $200.00 a month for everything I do except maintenance. I get $9.00 an hour when I do maintenance. I feel this is not fair compensation and would like to know if its good,common or unfair compensation.

I manage 55 units. My office hours are from 9am to 2pm. The sign on my door says "do not disturb unless it's an emergency". My tenants all know that an emergency is a water leak that they cannot control by bucket until the next working day OR an electrical problem that could start a fire. So they do not disturb me. Yes, it's a 24/7 job BUT you can make it very easy on yourself by lining the tenants out so they do not disturb you after hours. Do that for your own well being. I get a free 3bd apartment with utilities paid. I have to pay for my own cable and phone and have a salary of a little over 1200 a month. No extra for maintenance, it's covered by the salary.

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Noemi Cordova in Pomona, California

33 months ago

Looking for a 3 BDRM apartment in the Inland Empire. I have 10 years plus experience in managing apartment buildings. Speak, write, and read fluent spanish and English. Proficient in Excel, Word and other software programs. Good, and pleasant disposition, responsiblie and very hard working.

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HSpencer in Lincoln, Arkansas

32 months ago

Sudie said: Apartment manager jobs have pretty fast turnover. Most managers cant hang for more than a year because the tenants drive them crazy. My company alone, in the small area where I live, has already gone through 4 sets of mgrs in 2 years at some of our complexes. The jobs are out there, trust me.
Just remember that you give up your privacy. Unfortunately most complexes dont have a separate managers unit, so you have to share walls with tenants.... sometimes listening to the noise after being in your office all day can make you nutty.
I think managers would last longer if their dwelling was detached from the tenants....
If anyone can hear me, and you are building an apartment complex, do a great service and let the manager unit stand alone.

We have four buildings in our Elderly and Disabled complex. A,B,C,D. Bldg A contains the community room, laundry, maintenance room, and from the porch of the office, there is the manager's 2 bdr 1 ba apt. B and C are all one bedroom apts and D is two bedroom apts. Bldg A faces the highway, but can observe the entrance to the complex. It is an excellent arrangement. Our private parking (sign) is in front of the building (manager parking only). I have no problems with anyone trying to park in it. I have a lawnmower storage and shop behind the complex. It is my private retreat. Heated and AC'd. I love the setup here.

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Noemi Cordova in Pomona, California

32 months ago

I am currently looking for a 3 BRM apartment. I have 10 years experience managing apartment bldgs. 2 yrs in one complex and 8 yrs in another. Please let me know if you have something available for me. Thank you

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A in Lufkin, Texas

32 months ago

T said: divide the amount of full units by the total amout of units, then you will know what percent full you are.

Gpi= the total income you could make... So u take the total units u have and x that by the rent. So for a easy example: if you have 10units that rent for 800 a month then your gpi is 8000.00. I hope that helps u.

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meanlittlemanagergirl in North Pole, Alaska

32 months ago

ginger in oakdale in Toledo, Ohio said: I was an apartment manager some years ago. Now we (husband and I) are managers of a mobile home park. Please someone, anyone, give us a job at an apartement complex anyday. you think managing a complex is tough. Try babysitting a bunch of homeowners that think you sole job is to quite a barking dog. or tell you about a loud party but won't sign a complaint form. I could go on and on but trust me, it's a horse of a very different color. Then just for grins and giggles, toss in the old manager that was fired for doing a lousy job, oh ya. piece of cake... not!!!

Haha! It's no different. I manage an large apartment complex and the tenants behave exactly the same as you just described( loud parties; barking dogs;noisy kids...and the all annoying "someone's parked in my spot, cant you have them towed?" at 12 at night). It's like running a HUGE daycare 24/7! It is a horse of EXACTLY the same color. Sorry to disappoint :(. People are idiots no matter where they live or what they live in.They whine and complain ALL the time.

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Corey in Los Angeles, California

14 months ago

judy in Seattle, Washington said: Wow! Looks like you need to have talk with the owner. If the property is in need of constant repairs then you need a full time maintenance person to help out. Managing is a job in itself. I manage a 50 unit and I have maintenance part-time also but there aren't a lot of problems. Ask! It won't hurt.

Tell the owner to take a flying leap. You need 2 guys for a 50 unit building.

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